October 25, 2014, 05:28:32 AM

Author Topic: Laptop Editing - Best Setup  (Read 5979 times)

ishdakuteb

  • Canon 6D
  • *****
  • Posts: 379
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2014, 12:24:35 PM »
forgot to say that the dell xps 15 that i suggested is integrated with QHD display.  its specs are somewhat identical to MAC Book Pro.  below is a side by side comparison that i did last year, prior to targeting stuff that i want to buy.  keep in mind that MAC, for now, is always a winner when talking about noise and use time on battery life.


canon rumors FORUM

Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #15 on: August 14, 2014, 12:24:35 PM »

MxM

  • PowerShot G1 X II
  • ***
  • Posts: 40
    • View Profile
    • Maxim Linssen Photography
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #16 on: August 14, 2014, 01:31:40 PM »

I would not get a high end gaming laptop for photo editing, since a lot of your money will go towards a nice video card for gaming, which is not all that relevant for photo editing.  My laptop has the Intel video card AND an Nvidia card, and even using Photoshop 6 with 36 GB RAW files, the graphic card doesn't even kick in (Nvidia Optimus function).

Optimus doesn't change/switch automatically between your onboard and nvidia gpu. You have to manually set an dedicated GPU for each application (e.g. Photoshop) in nvidia control panel.

Not all programs works flawless with the 'auto select' feature. So your quote above doesn't make any sense. Select manually your nvidia GPU and you will see that things do speed up.

MxM




archiea

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 89
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #17 on: August 14, 2014, 03:37:19 PM »
 

Hi everyone!  With my crazy schedule, I typically purchase a very high-end laptop and edit using it (since I've gotta be mobile).  My current model is a powerful ASUS which is in their Republic of Gamers lineup.  I've forgotten the actual #, but it's only 1 year old as of now.  I have had no problems with the ability to handle my editing needs, and the monitor (sometimes bashed as the weak point of Asus and their laptop lineup) has been good for me once I purchased/used the Spyder Pro 4.

Here's my question:  I'm getting a new laptop soon, but the specs I'm looking at are the high-end gaming ones.  I guess my question is this:  Is it overkill?  Should I be looking at a particular linup of laptops which someone here's had good success with?  I like having the newest stuff, but I don't wanna buy a gaming system which I'll never game on. 

Oh, and Photography only.  No video, or plans to go that direction.

Any thoughts?  Thanks in advance.

I'm not looking to get flambé-ed, but I do hear this often from my windows buds where they tout how much cheaper their PC laptop is compared to a Mac, only to need to replace a year or two later because of "issues". I have a 2011 i7 refurbished with a 17" screen and a SSD, and it still flies! I'm not advocating getting a Mac but just askin'

What I would suggest is:
1) put an ssd in the cd drive and get large capacity HD or use the current included drive.
2) move your current in progress files to the ssd. This gives you speed for your current projects while the standard HD gives you capacity.
3) for photography editing, get 16GB, an i7 processor and as large a screen as you can get. 17" and above. If your current machine has these specs then just get an SSD.
4) If you get a new PC, immediately erase the drive and do a clean install of windows. This is to clear the bloatware that all pc's come with.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2014, 03:44:24 PM by archiea »

Famateur

  • Canon 70D
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2014, 04:31:39 PM »
It might be helpful to know that the Dell XPS 15 is the "consumer" version of the Dell Precision M3800 Mobile Workstation from their "business" line. Not sure if that means it will last any longer.

My only experience between equivalent "consumer" and "business" laptops is with HP. I got a business laptop, and my boss got essentially the same machine from their "consumer" line to save money. Seven years later, he's on his third "consumer" laptop (getting ready for a fourth), and my trusty HP is still going strong and has never let me down. I'm only moving to the Dell because a 7-year-old laptop just can't keep up with all of today's demands, and the current stable of HP mobile workstations just can't compete for the combination of price, performance and size -- not to mention the Ultrasharp display. If the Dell disappoints, I'll go back to HP.

For $1,700, you get:

  • Intel i7 4712HQ 2.3 - 3.3GHz (Haswell)
  • 8GB RAM
  • 500GB Hybrid Drive (with available second bay)
  • 1920x1080 IPS Ultrasharp touch display
  • 18MM (.71") thin
  • 4.15lbs

Edited to add: For another $75 on Amazon or NewEgg, I can double the RAM. Another $90, and I can add a 120GB Samsung SSD for system and programs and use the hybrid drive for storage.
« Last Edit: August 14, 2014, 04:36:03 PM by Famateur »

Mt Spokane Photography

  • EF 50mm F 0.7 IS
  • *********
  • Posts: 8893
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2014, 04:41:02 PM »
I went out looking at laptops last week, I looked at 50 or more.  None impressed mt as suitable for a primary photo editing tool.  Displays were mostly horrible, and all seemed to have one drawback or another.

I finally just gave up, I've had my Lenovo, poor screen and all for 4 years, its still going strong.


As to windows laptops dying soon, there are at least 100 times as many of them out there compared to macs, so its not surprising that you hear about them dying.  Usually, its the hard drive which dies from shock, a SSD is cheap now and fixes that.  Of course, a $200 laptop cuts corners and is more likely to fail than a better quality unit.

Famateur

  • Canon 70D
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2014, 04:59:30 PM »
I went out looking at laptops last week, I looked at 50 or more.  None impressed mt as suitable for a primary photo editing tool.  Displays were mostly horrible, and all seemed to have one drawback or another.

Amen. It's so hard to find the right combination of power, size and display quality -- oh, and price. :)

Some of the Lenovo machines tempted me, but I just can't get past the Fn key being swapped with the Ctrl key. I'm sure I'd get used to it if it was my only keyboard, but I'd rather keep the "manual of arms", as it were, identical with all my other keyboards. Maybe these two keys can be programmed to be swapped back to "normal"?

Another thing that bugs me is port layout on most machines. First, putting display and power ports on the side is just silly, but nearly all of them do these days. Second, they almost always put the two close together on the same side, leading to EMI that can make the external display look like it's had one too many Red Bulls (that's right -- unplug your power cord, and suddenly the dancing lines disappear). Power and display adapters should be on opposite ends...of the BACK of the machine. Maybe I just haven't found a display cable with decent enough EMI shielding... :P

I'll know in a couple of weeks if the Dell Precision M3800 I ordered is worth it...

expatinasia

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 945
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2014, 09:11:13 AM »
It might be helpful to know that the Dell XPS 15 is the "consumer" version of the Dell Precision M3800 Mobile Workstation from their "business" line. Not sure if that means it will last any longer.

I use Dell Precision, and it is difficult to fault them. Built like tanks and they are among the most powerful laptops you can buy (hence the size). For video editing and high res photo editing I would say go with a Dell Precision. You just need to decide the size, specs and model you want.
1D X + backup + different L lenses etc.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #21 on: August 15, 2014, 09:11:13 AM »

MichaelHodges

  • Canon 6D
  • *****
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #22 on: August 15, 2014, 10:27:26 AM »
As a non-Mac user who searched a long time for a self-contained photo editing laptop (IE no reliance on hooking up to external monitor), I admit it was a difficult road as others alluded to.

99% of laptops come with unacceptable TN panels, which make it very difficult to edit photos properly. You may as well blindfold yourself and edit in Lightroom, because you'll be shocked when you see your photos on a stable IPS screen afterwards, whether it's an iTouch, iPad, or home monitor.

I see a lot of talk about CPU's, ram, double disk drives, and 17 inch screens. None of that matters if the LCD screen is crap. And trust me when I say all TN panels are just that. It doesn't matter what the resolution is, the upgrade path, whatever. It's still like looking through muddy water, and when you turn your head an inch you're getting different colors and contrast.

 In terms of value, this is the best rated IPS panel outside of the $2000 retina display:

http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Acer-Aspire-V5-573G-54208G50aii-Notebook.99264.0.html

"The Acer's coverage of the available color spaces is on a very high level. "

"We really have to emphasize the excellent contrast ratio of 1,301:1 that is enabled by the low black value of the IPS panel. "

I have searched high and low for a good photo editing laptop. The screen on this is glorious, and will destroy your 24 inch TN monitor. you'll want to toss it in the garbage. You'll want to stop using any other TN panel laptop, regardless of specs.

It's not a perfect laptop. The build is slim. There's flex. But they sure got the screen right.

Here's a side by side comparison of TN versus IPS:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q2O63oBOvJU
« Last Edit: August 15, 2014, 10:30:02 AM by MichaelHodges »

beckstoy

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 138
  • Bokeh, Baby!
    • View Profile
    • Pure Touch Photography
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #23 on: August 15, 2014, 10:38:29 AM »

I would not get a high end gaming laptop for photo editing, since a lot of your money will go towards a nice video card for gaming, which is not all that relevant for photo editing.  My laptop has the Intel video card AND an Nvidia card, and even using Photoshop 6 with 36 GB RAW files, the graphic card doesn't even kick in (Nvidia Optimus function).

Optimus doesn't change/switch automatically between your onboard and nvidia gpu. You have to manually set an dedicated GPU for each application (e.g. Photoshop) in nvidia control panel.

Not all programs works flawless with the 'auto select' feature. So your quote above doesn't make any sense. Select manually your nvidia GPU and you will see that things do speed up.

MxM

Very cool idea.  I'd not thought of doing that.  Thanks!
5DM3, EF 50 f1.4, EF 24-70 f2.8 II, EF 70-200 f2.8 USM IS II, EF 24-104 f4, Siggy 12-24 f3.5

Famateur

  • Canon 70D
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #24 on: August 15, 2014, 11:48:00 AM »
It might be helpful to know that the Dell XPS 15 is the "consumer" version of the Dell Precision M3800 Mobile Workstation from their "business" line. Not sure if that means it will last any longer.

I use Dell Precision, and it is difficult to fault them. Built like tanks and they are among the most powerful laptops you can buy (hence the size). For video editing and high res photo editing I would say go with a Dell Precision. You just need to decide the size, specs and model you want.

Very reassuring -- thank you! I'm excited for mine to arrive...

Famateur

  • Canon 70D
  • ****
  • Posts: 276
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #25 on: August 15, 2014, 11:49:40 AM »
I see a lot of talk about CPU's, ram, double disk drives, and 17 inch screens. None of that matters if the LCD screen is crap. And trust me when I say all TN panels are just that. It doesn't matter what the resolution is, the upgrade path, whatever. It's still like looking through muddy water, and when you turn your head an inch you're getting different colors and contrast.

Agreed! With current technology, it's IPS or nothing for photo editing.

shawnc

  • SX60 HS
  • **
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup--In Defense of Cheap(ish)
« Reply #26 on: August 15, 2014, 01:08:41 PM »
When I bought my laptop six months ago, I was looking to max out performance, but my budget couldn't handle my "I wants". After researching real world performance strictly for photo editing, I "settled" on a i5 dual core, graphics-on-chip computer with SSD and 8GB RAM (MacBook Pro 13" Retina packaging-but Windows will do the real work about the same). Compared to my i7 quad core desktop with a 7200 rpm HD and 16GB RAM, photo editing is a tick slower (just noticeable) but all file-related actions are much faster. Point being "Best Setup" and "Reasonable Setup" are priced significantly differently. I edit hundreds of photos a week, and my workflow isn't hindered when I use my low end laptop. Also, big screens are great if you have the desk space (buy a separate monitor), but laptops are all about mobility and a 13" works great in coach class and crowded cafés.

expatinasia

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 945
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #27 on: August 16, 2014, 04:33:29 AM »
Optimus doesn't change/switch automatically between your onboard and nvidia gpu. You have to manually set an dedicated GPU for each application (e.g. Photoshop) in nvidia control panel.

Are you sure about that on all systems? I think that is how it used to work.

I personally believe that depending on what card you have and what system you have it does switch automatically.

I know mine does.
1D X + backup + different L lenses etc.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #27 on: August 16, 2014, 04:33:29 AM »

DesignJinni

  • Power Shot G7X
  • **
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
    • FB Page
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #28 on: August 17, 2014, 02:43:16 AM »
 My 2cents…
If viewing angles are an issue then IPS primary advantage over TN screens is that it has better viewing angles... And that's pretty much it.
A High-end laptop TN screens are good enough for image processing’s as well as mostly people always uses optimal viewing angle.
I am using two Z30i 30-inch IPS LED Monitors on a Z820 workstation with a nvidia quadro 6000 6gb GDDR5. I am also using a Qosmio 17.3" Qosmio Laptop.
Off course there one cannot compare these two setup, but I don’t feel Qosmio TN panel much of a letdown compared to IPS.
TN: In combination with LED back-lighting, TN monitors also offer high brightness and draw less power than competing technologies. The drawbacks to the technology are the color shifts that occur at wider viewing angles.
IPS: Noticeably better color reproduction and better viewing angles. The downside used to be a difficulty to emphasize blacks, which in turn meant problems with the contrast.
http://www.tnpanel.com/tn-vs-ips-va/
While IPS is always better to have for images, but believe me it's not a must. There are many professionals who are using way worst displays. Have you seen the Samsung 12.2 Note Pro? Samsung used a TFT LCD in it, have a look at it the images and color look just gorgeous on it.
The way i see it, for a laptop 17" is the way to go, IPS yes better to have but not a must to sacrifice other components. As long as the display is good enough it will do. And not all IPS are made equal. GDDR5 Graphic card yes is a much, large RAM & SSD, Dual hard drive bays & i7 processor.
Plugging the laptop to an external "LARGE" IPS monitor is a good way to see the difference and train your eyes on how to do those minor differences edits accordingly.
Canon 5D Mark II • 8-15mm F4 L • 24-105L • 70-200mm 2.8L IS II L • 50mm 1.4 • Sigma 12-24mm  • 600EX-RT • Kenko Tubes •

MichaelHodges

  • Canon 6D
  • *****
  • Posts: 370
    • View Profile
Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #29 on: August 23, 2014, 11:26:20 PM »
I went out looking at laptops last week, I looked at 50 or more.  None impressed mt as suitable for a primary photo editing tool.  Displays were mostly horrible, and all seemed to have one drawback or another.

Amen. It's so hard to find the right combination of power, size and display quality -- oh, and price. :)



I really hate to post this again, but let me save you the time:

http://www.notebookcheck.net/Review-Acer-Aspire-V5-573G-54208G50aii-Notebook.99264.0.html

The best IPS screen on a non-Mac, period. Great black levels and contrast, with no major color casts or jaggies like the other non-mac screens.

I'm running Lightroom 5 on the i5 with 12gigs of ram with no issue at all.  The screen is *unbeatable* for a laptop. I'd even call it glorious. And the laptop ships with MS Signature, which means no bloatware.

IMHO, I wouldn't worry about the CPU as much as I would the display as long as you have an i5 or higher.

I have a 240gb M-Sata as the O.S. drive, and a 1TB platter drive as the data drive.

« Last Edit: August 23, 2014, 11:28:41 PM by MichaelHodges »

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Laptop Editing - Best Setup
« Reply #29 on: August 23, 2014, 11:26:20 PM »