July 31, 2014, 11:21:53 PM

Author Topic: Is mirrorless camera replacement to DSLRs or just hybrid of aim/shoot and DSLR?R  (Read 4285 times)

dilbert

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I simply don't see the point of these cameras - as soon as you put a biggish lens on a mirrorless body, their size/portability "advantage" disappears.

And when the lenses that are available for use on your camera include all of those made for Leica Rangefinder cameras, why would you ever be putting a biggish lens on it?

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lol

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* features: size doesn't always matter, but without a mirror there's no phase-detect autofocus, and what you can have in a mirrorless camera (contrast-detect autofocus) is still lagging (particularly, much slower)
For single shot AF, the recent micro-FourThirds have pretty much nailed the speed that with their optimised lenses, it can even be faster than a DSLR with kit lens. They have optimised both body and lens to provide that AF speed, which I don't think any normal person can complain about.

The major weakness for me is the absence of distance tracking AF. For phase AF in mirrorless, check out the recently launched Nikon 1. They have implemented that on the main sensor so you get the best of both worlds although it does seem less effective than DSLR phase AF in low light based on current reviews. Still, the potential is there and the gap keeps narrowing.
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KeithR

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And when the lenses that are available for use on your camera include all of those made for Leica Rangefinder cameras, why would you ever be putting a biggish lens on it?

Because I shoot birds and wildlife.

elflord

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And when the lenses that are available for use on your camera include all of those made for Leica Rangefinder cameras, why would you ever be putting a biggish lens on it?

Because I shoot birds and wildlife.

You get some size savings due to the crop factor. For example, the panasonic 100-300mm lens is substantially smaller than any 600mm canon lens. But like the rangefinders, these cameras are really best suited to wide to normal focal length lenses. Here they have a substantial size advantage over DSLRs -- both by removing the mirror and designing a mount that facilitates small lenses.

Bengt Nyman

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Mirrorless cameras, could they really be a replacement to existing DSLRs.
The DSLR concept was invented for object viewing using a film camera.
Using a digital sensor with a high resolution Optical View Finder and sensor auto focus eliminates the need for a big, slow, noisy, moving mirror.
It's only a matter of time when essentially all handheld cameras will be mirrorless.
A lot of people are arguing: "what's the point of smaller cameras when the lenses are so big anyway?"
The point is not just the size. There is a world of difference in camera speed, accuracy and features as well.
Take a look at the Sony NEX 7 as just one example.
The lenses will be getting a lot shorter too. Compare modern telescopes to old all-glass telescopes.
The same thing is likely to happen to camera lenses.

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