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Author Topic: Battery grips  (Read 7469 times)

handsomerob

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2011, 03:14:29 PM »


Half the time, when I turn the camera vertically, I forget to use the controls on the grip. Frankly, I think they designed it poorly by putting the shutter release on the right side of the grip. I think it would be more natural on the left side, but that may be just me.

I'm confused by this. The normal shutter is on the right side of the grip.

Hmm...  ??? strange indeed.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2011, 03:43:11 PM by handsomerob »

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2011, 03:14:29 PM »

daveheinzel

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #16 on: December 28, 2011, 03:17:49 PM »
I have a 7D and purchased the Zeikos grip. I had the Canon grip for my old 20D, and I can't say I notice a difference between build quality of the two. I haven't had any problems with the Zeikos grip in over a year of solid use. The only oddity is that the removable battery compartment door from the 7D doesn't really snap into its holding place on the Zeikos grip, but this has never been a problem (nor has the door fallen out of there).

If price wasn't an issue (this is half the Canon grip), I'd still go with the Zeikos. No complaints.

DavidRiesenberg

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #17 on: December 28, 2011, 03:47:51 PM »
On the 5D, I have the Canon grip while the 7D is gripped by an Aputure one off eBay. Build quality is very similar and it works just as well as the Canon one. I don't think I'll ever by a Canon grip again, honestly.
Also, while mine does not, some third party grips offer a built-in intervalometer which is a nice feature to have on the body instead of using a remote for time lapses.

Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #18 on: December 28, 2011, 03:48:48 PM »
I had to take even my Canon grip off when using a medium-heavy lens on a tripod.  There is just too much flex, so its difficult to position, and, of course, it is not stable.

I see the grips as being useful for holding the camera in portrait mode by hand, or on a tripod with a smaller lens, but its a pain to take it off every time you want to use a telephoto like the 100-400mmL or larger.

D_Rochat

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2011, 04:07:06 PM »
I had to take even my Canon grip off when using a medium-heavy lens on a tripod.  There is just too much flex, so its difficult to position, and, of course, it is not stable.

I see the grips as being useful for holding the camera in portrait mode by hand, or on a tripod with a smaller lens, but its a pain to take it off every time you want to use a telephoto like the 100-400mmL or larger.

Why are you not using the tripod collar with the 100-400 or similar? That's what it is designed for. I see what you mean if it was a 24-70 without a sturdy tripod, but 70-200 lenses and up can use tripod collars to middle the weight.

Ryusui

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2011, 04:07:51 PM »
I had to take even my Canon grip off when using a medium-heavy lens on a tripod.  There is just too much flex, so its difficult to position, and, of course, it is not stable.

I see the grips as being useful for holding the camera in portrait mode by hand, or on a tripod with a smaller lens, but its a pain to take it off every time you want to use a telephoto like the 100-400mmL or larger.
Would you mind expanding on this?  I'm afraid I wasn't really able to understand what the issue is.  If you're using the 100-400 or larger, you'd be attaching the lens to the tripod, so how would the grip affect this?

I ask only because I recently upgraded my entire kit from a 5Dc and a couple of smaller lenses to a 5DII with lenses including a 70-200.  I haven't purchased my grip yet (I really miss it after having it on my 5Dc) and if there's a problem with the grip and large lenses, I'd like to understand it.  Thanks!

KeithR

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2011, 04:08:12 PM »

I bought a Meike batterygrip for my Canon 7D
I do not recommend this grip.

I've been using a Meike grip on my 7D for over two years now - and I'm not particularly gentle with my kit (it's not cosseted in a studio) - and it works as well today as the day I bought it.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2011, 04:10:34 PM by KeithR »

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2011, 04:08:12 PM »

92101media

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2011, 04:22:01 PM »
I've been researching this too. I believe for the Canon 7D (and other higher end DSLRs in Canon's range too), it's worth going for the genuine Canon battery grip, since I believe the genuine Canon battery grip is weather sealed and has a magnesium alloy body. The genuine battery grips also seem to match the finish & texture of the main body better than that of the generics too, if that is important to you. Of the generic battery grips, it seems like the Zeikos is the most liked / best rated.

candyman

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2011, 04:25:43 PM »

I bought a Meike batterygrip for my Canon 7D
I do not recommend this grip.

I've been using a Meike grip on my 7D for over two years now - and I'm not particularly gentle with my kit (it's not cosseted in a studio) - and it works as well today as the day I bought it.

The shutterrelease problem started after I used the grip frequently in portrait position for AI-servo sportsphotos.
But maybe I got a bad copy...don't know... :(

D_Rochat

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #24 on: December 28, 2011, 04:44:21 PM »
I've been researching this too. I believe for the Canon 7D (and other higher end DSLRs in Canon's range too), it's worth going for the genuine Canon battery grip, since I believe the genuine Canon battery grip is weather sealed and has a magnesium alloy body. The genuine battery grips also seem to match the finish & texture of the main body better than that of the generics too, if that is important to you. Of the generic battery grips, it seems like the Zeikos is the most liked / best rated.

Good point. To my knowledge, there is no sealing where the grip meets the body, but there is on the battery compartment where it really matters. I don't know how the third party grips are constructed, but this would be a big deal for me. It would be a shame to lose weather sealing with a cheaper grip if they don't have it.

unfocused

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #25 on: December 28, 2011, 06:05:52 PM »


Half the time, when I turn the camera vertically, I forget to use the controls on the grip. Frankly, I think they designed it poorly by putting the shutter release on the right side of the grip. I think it would be more natural on the left side, but that may be just me.

I'm confused by this. The normal shutter is on the right side of the grip.

Hmm...  ??? strange indeed.

Not strange, but perhaps I'm not explaining myself adequately.

Years of shooting with film cameras taught me to rotate the camera clockwise for a vertical shot. It is much more stable, because the right hand supports the weight of the camera from below, while also allowing you to operate the shutter button. This leaves your left hand free to support the lens (and focus and adjust the aperture in the "old days.")

But, with the Canon grip, you have to rotate the camera counterclockwise to use the grip's shutter release. That means that your right hand is suspending the camera body from above, not supporting it from below. It has the advantage that you are still using your right hand to fire the shutter button. But, it feels unnatural and less stable to me.

It is hard to break nearly 40 years of habit and as a practical matter I find myself seldom using the shutter release on the grip. My hands just naturally turn the camera clockwise and continue to use the shutter button on the camera. It's not a big deal.
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D_Rochat

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #26 on: December 28, 2011, 06:18:59 PM »
But, with the Canon grip, you have to rotate the camera counterclockwise to use the grip's shutter release. That means that your right hand is suspending the camera body from above, not supporting it from below. It has the advantage that you are still using your right hand to fire the shutter button. But, it feels unnatural and less stable to me.

I see where you are going with holding the camera (minus grip) by rotating clock-wise. What I don't get is why you feel that you still need to support the camera from above with a battery grip. The whole point with a battery grip is that even though you rotate the camera for portrait orientation, you can still hold the camera as if you were in landscape orientation. I apologize if I'm missing something, but it still doesn't make sense.

*EDIT*

If what you are saying is that you just prefer to hold the camera from the bottom, then fine. But I don't see how that makes a difference with a heavier lens. The weight of the lens will still pull forward, leaving you to support it with your left hand. I'm not trying to say you're wrong or anything like that, just trying to figure it out.  ???
« Last Edit: December 28, 2011, 06:23:52 PM by D_Rochat »

unfocused

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2011, 07:04:30 PM »
But, with the Canon grip, you have to rotate the camera counterclockwise to use the grip's shutter release. That means that your right hand is suspending the camera body from above, not supporting it from below. It has the advantage that you are still using your right hand to fire the shutter button. But, it feels unnatural and less stable to me.

I see where you are going with holding the camera (minus grip) by rotating clock-wise. What I don't get is why you feel that you still need to support the camera from above with a battery grip. The whole point with a battery grip is that even though you rotate the camera for portrait orientation, you can still hold the camera as if you were in landscape orientation. I apologize if I'm missing something, but it still doesn't make sense.

*EDIT*

If what you are saying is that you just prefer to hold the camera from the bottom, then fine. But I don't see how that makes a difference with a heavier lens. The weight of the lens will still pull forward, leaving you to support it with your left hand. I'm not trying to say you're wrong or anything like that, just trying to figure it out.  ???

Not a big deal. Just 40 years of turning the camera one direction and then trying to teach myself to turn it the other. Body-memory is hard to re-learn. If I think about it, I rotate it counterclockwise, but if I'm trying to compose an image quickly the reflexive actions kick in.
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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2011, 07:04:30 PM »

tron

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2011, 07:22:41 PM »
I understand what you mean. I am used to rotating the camera the same way as you do.
Don't laugh but it "feels" proper for me to rotate it clockwise even ... with the grip!!!!
So, I have "solved" this problem by ... not using grips!

OK there are other reasons too, like the very big size which causes the camera not being able
to be put to my mostly used camera bags and the increase in weight. Plus, I have put a kirk plate on the bottom
of the camera which allows it to connect to my Markins head. To put the grip I would have to
unscrew the plate and get another plate to screw on the grip!

D_Rochat

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2011, 09:03:44 PM »
It's definitely a preference thing. I for one can't live without it now (at least on a tiny Rebel) but I completely understand and see how it's not for some people. You really have to go to a shop and try one out if you can before you buy.

But back to the original question, I'd say go OEM if you are going to purchase a grip. You spent good money on a 7D, so why cheap out on the grip. Especially if weather sealing is going to be an issue. To me, it's like putting a bargain bin filter on an L lens. IMHO.

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Re: Battery grips
« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2011, 09:03:44 PM »