January 24, 2015, 11:19:25 PM

Author Topic: Deep Sky Astrophotography  (Read 21921 times)

East Wind Photography

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #150 on: January 19, 2015, 10:17:10 PM »
Great images, guys! I'm glad to see some of you are getting into astrophotography. :) It's a great hobby, especially if your an insomniac like me. :P


nightclicks, excellent results with M42 there. You managed to pull out some of the faint outer dust, which is really quite a challenge. You must have some decently dark skies to do that.

I used to do it the hard way back in the day.  Started out with a cold camera.  Used dry ice to chill the film down  to about -20F then exposed for hours tracking manually with a joystick.  I then upgraded to using hypersensitized film...soaking the film under temperature and pressure in nitrogen and hydrogen gas.  Cost more but you could treat several rolls of film at a time.  Stacking was something we did in the dark room by stacking multiple negatives in the enlarger and manually registering the stars.  It was all painful and extremely time consuming. 

Digital has really improved things quite a bit for astrophotographers.  You can achieve better results in far less time and effort once you learn the software side....and the best part is that can be done in the warmth of your living room.



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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #150 on: January 19, 2015, 10:17:10 PM »

TLau74

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #151 on: January 20, 2015, 07:08:06 AM »
It's really amazing what you guys can do.  I'm just starting to get into astrophotography.  Here is my 2nd attempt at Orion Nebula.  Shot with Canon 6D, 70-200mm F2.8L II (F2.8 @200mm), ISO 3200, approx. 200 images at 1.6s stacked with DSS.  (Followed Forrest Tanaka's technique on YouTube.)  I don't know if it is the settings I used or the technique I used for PP, it just doesn't look like I was able to get as much detail as some of you.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2015, 07:13:16 AM by TLau74 »
Flilckr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31505768@N08/
Canon EOS 6D| 24~105mm F4 IS|100mm F2.8L IS Macro| Samyang 14mm F2.8 ED AS IF UMC

niteclicks

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #152 on: January 20, 2015, 09:50:15 AM »
TLau74 , careful this can lead to sleepless nights. :D Looks a lot better than my first attempts at Orion, quite good for 1.6 sec. I think it is actually one of the harder objects due to its wide brightness range and the super bright core. Are you tracking? To get the fainter parts you need to expose the background if you can't see the background you can't see the stuff that is barely brighter than it( if that makes since?). Think of the last two screen adjustment bars on one of those gray scale screen adjustment bars and setting your screen up to see the difference in them . ETR works even better at night .

niteclicks

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #153 on: January 20, 2015, 10:21:06 AM »
Still a work in progress, really having a ruff time with this one. The tail is clear to me in the subs but getting it pulled out of the star field is really pushing MY limits. At least I had another hour of clear skies before the clouds moved in last night  :)  This is with the 5DIII and 200 2.8l II, so it spans about 7.5 deg. here. I have some other processing steps to try and tons of subs, so maybe eventually.

TLau74

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #154 on: January 20, 2015, 10:45:36 AM »
Thanks niteclicks.  I'm not tracking automatically (if this is what you mean), only manually adjusting the lens position every 40 shots to get Orion more or less in the center of the frame allowing easier stacking in DSS.  Each of the 200 shots taken is 1.6s each; so total exposure time is 320s or 5.3min.  I'm already at 3200iso so I can either increase the iso to 6400 maybe still ok for the 6D (?) or I can double the number of subs taken (400 x 1.6s = 640s or approx. 10.7min total exposure).  Which would be better, increase iso or # of subs?  I want to use a similar technique to try to capture Comet Lovejoy.  Friday should be another clear night and I want to take advantage of this (even though it will be around -5deg Celcius).
Flilckr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/31505768@N08/
Canon EOS 6D| 24~105mm F4 IS|100mm F2.8L IS Macro| Samyang 14mm F2.8 ED AS IF UMC

niteclicks

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #155 on: January 20, 2015, 11:10:14 AM »
You are doing a fantastic job doing it that way. At some point you hit a wall where noise swamps the signal and only longer exposures will help, Jrista could help you better. Maybe build yourself a barn door tracker . You already have good data on the brighter stuff, I would give it a try and add it to what you have.

East Wind Photography

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #156 on: January 21, 2015, 12:10:54 PM »
This was 12x50 sec at iso1600 with my 7d2 and 300mm f2.8 II lens at f4.  No calibration.  Stacked in DSS and then stretched with pixinsight.

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #156 on: January 21, 2015, 12:10:54 PM »

niteclicks

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #157 on: January 21, 2015, 12:49:36 PM »
This was 12x50 sec at iso1600 with my 7d2 and 300mm f2.8 II lens at f4.  No calibration.  Stacked in DSS and then stretched with pixinsight.

 I like  how you have processed it. What settings did you stack with ? Median should get rid of those satellite tracks .
  Steve

East Wind Photography

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #158 on: January 21, 2015, 01:26:33 PM »
This was 12x50 sec at iso1600 with my 7d2 and 300mm f2.8 II lens at f4.  No calibration.  Stacked in DSS and then stretched with pixinsight.

 I like  how you have processed it. What settings did you stack with ? Median should get rid of those satellite tracks .
  Steve

There is also one sub that did not register properly.  The sequence was a test right after I got my star-watcher tracker.  Was mainly interested in seeing how well it would track.  The stacking was an afterthought after I discovered the images again.  Once the skies clear up again I'll give it another run with some calibration frames.

niteclicks

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #159 on: January 21, 2015, 01:31:09 PM »
Looks like it tracked pretty well. What tripod did you use it on?

East Wind Photography

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #160 on: January 21, 2015, 03:51:58 PM »
Looks like it tracked pretty well. What tripod did you use it on?

It's an induro carbon fiber that use with a wimberly mount ... Seems fairly stable with my 300.  When I mount the 600 on the tracker its gets a bit wobbly but does ok as well as long as there is no wind.

niteclicks

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #161 on: January 21, 2015, 05:19:02 PM »
 I guess I need to look at one in person. I have an old meade lxd75 that I could not get good tracking out of that I had intended to be portable mount. But at time I was using an 8" Newtonian that acted like a sail in the lightest breeze. I may dig it out and see how it behaves with a lens. I would love to have something easier to haul on trips.

East Wind Photography

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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #162 on: January 21, 2015, 10:09:05 PM »
I guess I need to look at one in person. I have an old meade lxd75 that I could not get good tracking out of that I had intended to be portable mount. But at time I was using an 8" Newtonian that acted like a sail in the lightest breeze. I may dig it out and see how it behaves with a lens. I would love to have something easier to haul on trips.

This is the reason I got the Astro-track astrophoto package. The unit is about the size of two Dslrs (excluding the tripod) and I can pack in my luggage with the tripod.  It has an st4 interface as well so you can add a scope and guider to the setup for longer exposures.  I've taken up to 60 seconds on it and it tracks well even along the ecliptic. Haven't had a need to go much more than that yet due to light pollution. However I am planning a 2 week trip to Yellowstone next year and I'm shaking out all of the new gear now so I Dont have issues once I get there.  It seems to be the most portable option yet can easily handle the gear I intend to take with me.  300 2.8L ii, 5d3 and 7d2 Both with grips.

I think it's design capacity is 11kg.


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Re: Deep Sky Astrophotography
« Reply #162 on: January 21, 2015, 10:09:05 PM »