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Author Topic: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks  (Read 25281 times)

privatebydesign

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #45 on: October 15, 2016, 10:19:54 AM »
Another option you pay for and for those who use spot meter is to set "C.Fn1- Spot Meter. Linked to AF Point", you can also meter up to 8 (I think) areas to average the scene using AE lock/hold and the Fn button.

Now this one did come up in another thread where it was being requested as a feature for the 5D4 and Scott (PBD) debated the value of it.  I couldn't completely see why it would have any/many negatives although it may in fact not be that useful - another case where my expertise is not up to snuff.

I had actually selected that thinking that I'd rather have the metering off my subject that is under the AF point than some rather unrelated central region.  Now I'm wondering how big the metering region would be.  Your opinion?? 

Since I would be aware that I was metering off that region, I should be able to use it essentially the same as I would use the center region to confirm the brightness associated with my chosen subject (typically a bird only partially filling the frame).  On the other hand if the central metering is doing something more sophisticated involving the whole viewfinder and averaging, then that's a different story.

Jack

Again, my comments have been more nuanced than that. I am pro AF linked spot metering as an option, my comments have been towards people who want the feature yet clearly have no idea how limited its use for auto exposure images with no EC.

Spot metering can be a very powerful tool, but to think you are going to get good auto exposures with no exposure compensation is just plain wrong, as I have illustrated in the past. Linking spot metering to AF point has even more restricted practical use than center spot metering, though it does have a value, because the most powerful use of spot metering is to take several readings across the scene to enable us to place tonal values where we want within the exposure. If we take this care over our exposure and have a mind to processing and the actual final image output we have become mini Ansel Adams and are working the Zone system.

But to think AF linked spot metering with no EC is a catchall for difficult exposures is a recipe for disappointment. This is what I have rallied against previously.
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, DR, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #45 on: October 15, 2016, 10:19:54 AM »

arthurbikemad

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #46 on: October 15, 2016, 10:43:03 AM »
You talk a lot of sense Private :)

East Wind Photography

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #47 on: October 15, 2016, 10:48:15 AM »
Thanks arbitrage, I'll delve into this later with the camera in my lap.  Guess it doesn't make sense to use the set button to review images, although being a 6D person that struck my fancy.

Jack

I always use back button AF.  Af-on is set as normal, * is configured to spot AF so i can switch say between full af point tracking and spot AF by just selecting the appropriate button.  In addition the shutter button is configured to just meter on half press, not AF.

In essence the camera "default" is full time manual focus and have to press one of two back buttons to start an AF process.

Its confusing for a while until you get used to it but is quite a life saver when shooting sports and players are constantly cutting in front of your subject.  Just let up on the AF button when view is obstructed and resume when theyare clear.

More and more im using M mode with auto iso but it is a pain to do EC on the fly when top wheel is set for aperture and back wheel is set for shutter speed.  I use Set for manual Iso adjustment when needed.

Need more wheels and things to adjust everything.

privatebydesign

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #48 on: October 15, 2016, 12:51:41 PM »
Thanks arbitrage, I'll delve into this later with the camera in my lap.  Guess it doesn't make sense to use the set button to review images, although being a 6D person that struck my fancy.

Jack

I always use back button AF.  Af-on is set as normal, * is configured to spot AF so i can switch say between full af point tracking and spot AF by just selecting the appropriate button.  In addition the shutter button is configured to just meter on half press, not AF.

In essence the camera "default" is full time manual focus and have to press one of two back buttons to start an AF process.

Its confusing for a while until you get used to it but is quite a life saver when shooting sports and players are constantly cutting in front of your subject.  Just let up on the AF button when view is obstructed and resume when theyare clear.

More and more im using M mode with auto iso but it is a pain to do EC on the fly when top wheel is set for aperture and back wheel is set for shutter speed.  I use Set for manual Iso adjustment when needed.

Need more wheels and things to adjust everything.

I never got on with BBF, however I do get on with AF-on set to AF off. I think that arrangement gives you the power of AF/exposure separation but leaves your thumb free more of the time. Rather than always having to use your thumb when you want AF (most of the time) you only use it when you don't want AF, like focus and recompose or if a distracting element is coming across the subject etc.
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, DR, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #49 on: October 15, 2016, 04:29:26 PM »
Not sure who all is reading this thread but I for one am getting an education and am really appreciating it.  Clearly, I have not fully understood all the nuances of AF and AE.

Still mildly confused on this.  If I have BBF, AF-ON when pressed to do AI servo what do I get when it's released - is this One-shot or equivalent to One-shot?

Jack
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arbitrage

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #50 on: October 15, 2016, 06:57:42 PM »
Not sure who all is reading this thread but I for one am getting an education and am really appreciating it.  Clearly, I have not fully understood all the nuances of AF and AE.

Still mildly confused on this.  If I have BBF, AF-ON when pressed to do AI servo what do I get when it's released - is this One-shot or equivalent to One-shot?

Jack

The focusing would have been achieved using AI Servo.  If you release you can then recompose and trigger the shutter without re-activating AF.  Assuming you have AF taken off of the shutter button.

One-shot mode does focus differently and there are different settings for it in the AF menu.  It also is the mode that allows you to focus in the lowest light (I think -3EV on 1DX2).  AI Servo is not rated for that low of light.

If you leave the shutter button active for AF and change the main camera AF setting to One-Shot but still set the back button to servo then when you aren't pushing the back button you can push the shutter button to use One-Shot.  This eliminates the ability to focus recompose with the back button.  You can also set one of the back buttons to One-shot and when pushed it will focus using the One-Shot algorithms.  If you have the shutter button deactivated then you can focus recompose that way but having used the better light sensitive One-shot mode.

Personally I don't use One-shot as I"m never in that low of light.

PS.  If possible you might want to move this thread to the EOS Bodies section (not the rumour one).  It is posted in a Gallery forum where many people won't see the thread.
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Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #51 on: October 15, 2016, 07:49:19 PM »
arbitrage, that's very helpful, thanks.  So some/quite a few folk might be thinking they have one-shot when technically they don't.

I didn't realize it was in the wrong section and will check how things are arranged, but I don't know how to move it.

Jack
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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #51 on: October 15, 2016, 07:49:19 PM »

scottkinfw

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #52 on: October 15, 2016, 08:05:16 PM »
Jack,
I am sure you can find (and you have found some) guidance from others on how they set up the camera. However, I do not believe there is a sensible copy-and-be-happy approach. You need to figure out how to set it up for your need.

Personally I am not even close to using the camera to its fullest potential and I only master a minor part of its functional capabilities. My approach has been to think critically on what I need and what suits me. The most important being:

I use the AF-On button to activate one-shot in servo mode and not for BB focus.
I select number of AF points with the AF point selector (activate) and the front wheel (select).
I change ISO settings with the set button(activate) and the back wheel (select).
All other buttons are kept with their default functionality.

When it comes to all the internal settings, I do not believe there is a one package fits all option. You must spend time trying to understand what they do. In principle, you do nothing wrong by leaving them in their default position and then do them one by one as your experience grows.

One thing I am missing or have not been able to figure out, is how I can dial in exposure compensation in manual mode, without taking my eye away from the viewer. Currently I have to look at the display and it annoys me. If someone know if/how this can be done, I'd be happy.

As a sidenote, my camera fell on rocks the other day, so the mirror housing is damaged and the sensor is out of position ...  >:(

I agree with you Eldar.  I recommend going through the manual and change what seems reasonable to suit you.  Go out and shoot.  Get familiar with the camera and change setting from there.  Most of setting are at least OK at the defaults.  I went on a big trip and didn't have time to learn let alone master video.  I just flipped the switch, crossed my fingers, and 4K video came out great.

Eldar, I feel you.  My 1DXII fell yesterday, and it isn't working properly.  I looked inside and there is some damage just before the mirror.  I think my fav lens 24-71 208 IS II is toast because it no longer is recognized by camera.  Good thing Canon has the "insurance policy" just for this.
What a dagger in the heart.
So you are not alone.
sek
Cameras: 1DXII,5D III, 5D II.  Lenses    24-70 2.8L II IS, 70-200 f4L IS, 70-200 f2.8L IS II, EF 400 5.6L, 300 2.8 IS II, Samyang 14 mm 2.8.   Flashes: 600EX-RT X 2, ST-E3-RT, 580 EX II.
Plus lots of stuff that just didn't work for me

Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #53 on: October 15, 2016, 08:14:18 PM »
Firstly, checking how the threads are located, I'm as confused as ever regarding where this one would best fit.

Secondly, Larsskv posted a link to a video that has helped quite a few.  It's BBF and I will watch it shortly.

http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=30922.0

Jack

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East Wind Photography

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #54 on: October 15, 2016, 11:31:01 PM »
arbitrage, that's very helpful, thanks.  So some/quite a few folk might be thinking they have one-shot when technically they don't.

I didn't realize it was in the wrong section and will check how things are arranged, but I don't know how to move it.

Jack

Rather than fumble with one shot and ai servo, I program one of the front buttons to toggle those modes when pressed. I usually leave ai servo set as default and press the front button to switch to one shot for still subjects.

Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #55 on: October 16, 2016, 12:46:31 AM »
I agree that often a toggle can be more handy than having to hold a button.

After watching that slightly corny video on BBF I'm now intrigued about all the options and feel the need to carefully weigh the pros and cons.  Corny or not it was well worth my time to watch although the previous comments posted here had almost covered what is in the video.

I'm trying to remember the kind of snide remark one of the reviewers made about button functionality and programmability.  Is Canon really behind the others?  Not that I care since I'll be Canon till I die and hopefully that's a long time. :)

Now I need to dig into the Q menu and its programmability.

I spent good money on a pro camera, so I will persevere in learning how to use it for more than P&S if it kills me!  It's great that so many have offered good advice.

Jack
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Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #56 on: October 16, 2016, 03:40:39 AM »
The BBF topic has really taken off.  Here is another somewhat repetitious video and comments that are also interesting.

http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1467282&page=2

Jack
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arbitrage

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #57 on: October 16, 2016, 12:22:02 PM »
Owning the D500, I know that Canon is miles ahead on button customizability than Nikon is.  Maybe Sony allows you to have more freedom with assigning functions to buttons but Nikon is very poor.  It is impossible to quickly change AF modes when supporting a big lens on the Nikon.  Only on the most recent cameras D500/D5 can you now have more than one back button but it can't be modified as much as the Canon ones and can only change the AF point mode.

I think the 1DX2 was the first Canon that allows a button to be assigned to toggle OneShot/Servo AND allows you to just push the button and not have to hold it in.  All the previous ones you had to hold the button and releasing it switched back.  I believe (but could be wrong) that the 1DX2 allows the button to act as a toggle.  Push it a second time to get back to the default setting.

With Canon there are lots of different ways to get things done and I appreciate that.

I think that questions about a camera (that isn't a rumour) should go into the EOS-Bodies for Stills section of the forum.  But I don't think you will be able to move this.  A moderator may be able to move it if you PM them.  Not a big deal but more people would see it that way.  I only saw it because it was on the CR main page under "hot" forum topics!!
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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #57 on: October 16, 2016, 12:22:02 PM »

East Wind Photography

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #58 on: October 16, 2016, 03:49:25 PM »
Owning the D500, I know that Canon is miles ahead on button customizability than Nikon is.  Maybe Sony allows you to have more freedom with assigning functions to buttons but Nikon is very poor.  It is impossible to quickly change AF modes when supporting a big lens on the Nikon.  Only on the most recent cameras D500/D5 can you now have more than one back button but it can't be modified as much as the Canon ones and can only change the AF point mode.

I think the 1DX2 was the first Canon that allows a button to be assigned to toggle OneShot/Servo AND allows you to just push the button and not have to hold it in.  All the previous ones you had to hold the button and releasing it switched back.  I believe (but could be wrong) that the 1DX2 allows the button to act as a toggle.  Push it a second time to get back to the default setting.

With Canon there are lots of different ways to get things done and I appreciate that.

I think that questions about a camera (that isn't a rumour) should go into the EOS-Bodies for Stills section of the forum.  But I don't think you will be able to move this.  A moderator may be able to move it if you PM them.  Not a big deal but more people would see it that way.  I only saw it because it was on the CR main page under "hot" forum topics!!

One shot toggle is still only momentary.  Havent figured out a way to set for push on push off.  Still momentary is ok since the ring finger doesnt do a whole lot.  However 1dxii has two buttons there so need to press the correct button.  Was easier on the 7d2 and 5d3 where there is only one button.

arthurbikemad

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #59 on: October 16, 2016, 04:01:04 PM »
To set 1DX2 so AI servo or One shot locks or not use the INFO button when in custom controls.

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #59 on: October 16, 2016, 04:01:04 PM »