December 18, 2017, 06:20:20 AM

Author Topic: Print pricing  (Read 7199 times)

MrFotoFool

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Re: Print pricing
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2017, 10:14:31 PM »
If he is using pigment inks (as he says) and not dye inks, I think the print life is not a concern. Even without a sealed backing, it should last longer than most people will keep it hanging. Of course there are longevity variables when it comes to compatablity of ink and paper, but I don't know how much of an issue. I use a photo lab which I find both easier and cheaper than printing at home (but I also worked at that same lab for two decades, so I am biased).

As you noted at the start, there are no simple straightforward answers. The initial advice of marking up frame and print costs 2.5-3 times I think is solid advice. It is also good the way you are going about it - display at an established business instead of trying to do weekend arts and crafts shows. Those people (at least the ones I have seen) give away their work for practically nothing - just insane.

As for the suggestion for offering smaller sizes, I would maybe put a simple note next to the framed piece saying "other sizes available." This could imply either smaller or bigger, assuming you have the resolution to go bigger. I mean what if someone loves a piece and wants a framed and matted 30x40 or 40x60 for their living room?

As for numbered "limited edition", let's be honest. That is a marketing ploy that is essentially meaningless for all but the most famous high-end photographers. For most of us (including the thread starter), let's say we do a "limited edition" of one hundred. Even without limiting them, it is extremely unlikely we would ever sell more than a hundred regardless. However, it can add perceived value, even if the real world value is null. I have never done it myself and I see no reason to, but if you want to I don't think it can hurt because as I said you will likely never outsell your limit anyway.

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Re: Print pricing
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2017, 10:14:31 PM »

Kit Lens Jockey

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Re: Print pricing
« Reply #16 on: July 18, 2017, 10:08:56 AM »
As for numbered "limited edition", let's be honest. That is a marketing ploy that is essentially meaningless for all but the most famous high-end photographers. For most of us (including the thread starter), let's say we do a "limited edition" of one hundred. Even without limiting them, it is extremely unlikely we would ever sell more than a hundred regardless. However, it can add perceived value, even if the real world value is null. I have never done it myself and I see no reason to, but if you want to I don't think it can hurt because as I said you will likely never outsell your limit anyway.
Yes! Completely agree, and that's why I've decided not to do it. C'mon, I'm not kidding anyone here. Photos are limited to what I can sell, and that's very limited. But no one is being fooled here by some numbered edition thing. In fact, at this point, I have kind of an unwritten rule with myself that once someone buys a photo, that's it, no more prints of that photo, at least for a while. I'm not selling much, and there are so many good photos out there that can be taken. I'd rather people have the one and only copy of a photo on their wall and give them something really special, even if they don't realize it, than just fire up the printer and run off another copy of the same thing once something sells. That cheapens it, to me.

And yes, I am using pigment inks, and I just went to Red River Luster paper. Technically I guess anything less than "fine art" paper is not acid free, but like you said, as much as I'd be grateful for a photo of mine to be hanging somewhere long enough for that to be a serious issue, I doubt they will be.

drmikeinpdx

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Re: Print pricing
« Reply #17 on: July 18, 2017, 10:33:23 AM »
I've gradually gotten used to the idea of plastic glazing instead of glass in my frames.  It's lighter and cheaper.  I've noticed it doesn't scratch as easily as plastic did several years ago.  I'm not sure about UV protection.

I had to buy 20 frames for a gallery show last year and found a bargain at IKEA.  I also liked the fact that the frames were already packed in cases so you could easily lift 10 or 12 at a time.

I rather liked this one:  http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/00298289/#/00297416

It comes with a pre-cut mat board which is nice if you are trying to mass produce saleable framed prints.
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privatebydesign

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Re: Print pricing
« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2017, 10:42:27 AM »
I've gradually gotten used to the idea of plastic glazing instead of glass in my frames.  It's lighter and cheaper.  I've noticed it doesn't scratch as easily as plastic did several years ago.  I'm not sure about UV protection.

I had to buy 20 frames for a gallery show last year and found a bargain at IKEA.  I also liked the fact that the frames were already packed in cases so you could easily lift 10 or 12 at a time.

I rather liked this one:  http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/00298289/#/00297416

It comes with a pre-cut mat board which is nice if you are trying to mass produce saleable framed prints.

I print a rotating exhibition for a local authority. We use these frames from Ikea, they come with a cut mat and glass. They aren't particularly good quality, what at Ikea is, but they do the job and the rotation means each print has a hang time of 6 months. Biggest issue for me is the 3x4 format whereas most entries are 3x2.

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/00305869/

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Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: Print pricing
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2017, 10:56:23 AM »
As for 100 year preservation material (acid free paper, sealed, etc.,) I am not completely for it, especially for photos.  Few are precious enough to warrant such treatment.

Prints that after a few years (not 100) start to show UV yellowing, stains, or humidity-related issues - you'll never know where they may be installed - won't bode well for your business - unless they're used for temporary installations only. Even without going the full "100 year archival" procedure, sometimes it's just a matter of avoiding materials known for creating issues quickly, i.e. some cheap tapes or the like.

Yes, in one season, the wrong materials can wrinkle or bleed thru a print.  As long as materials and mounting techniques to avoid this are followed, a print should be fine for many many years. 

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Re: Print pricing
« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2017, 10:56:23 AM »