December 17, 2017, 01:35:22 AM

Author Topic: Exposing when the subject is both dark and white?  (Read 4129 times)

Pookie

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Re: Exposing when the subject is both dark and white?
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2017, 09:30:28 AM »
And this is why an incident meter is still used by the best photographers in the world to this very day. I love hearing about all these types of exposure issues from newbies. Why did my camera do this, why is this all dark or this is all blown out? Asked if they metered? Followed by meter?!?! yea, my camera is set to spot or evaluative or point... then looking incredulous as to why you would ever need a handheld meter in the modern age. A reflective meter can always lie or get confused... a incident never does and will save you tons of headaches.
I'm limping by with my current equipment... once I get that new lens with IS and blue goo... then I'll finally be able to go out and take my first decent picture...

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Re: Exposing when the subject is both dark and white?
« Reply #15 on: October 01, 2017, 09:30:28 AM »

mb66energy

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Re: Exposing when the subject is both dark and white?
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2017, 10:29:21 AM »
And this is why an incident meter is still used by the best photographers in the world to this very day. I love hearing about all these types of exposure issues from newbies. Why did my camera do this, why is this all dark or this is all blown out? Asked if they metered? Followed by meter?!?! yea, my camera is set to spot or evaluative or point... then looking incredulous as to why you would ever need a handheld meter in the modern age. A reflective meter can always lie or get confused... a incident never does and will save you tons of headaches.

Good hint - if an incident meter isn't available spot or selective metering on a gray card is another method to evaluate exposure in complicated cases - perhaps model and dog each hold one card in front of their faces to check lightning / exposure :) The gray card has to fill the sensitive area of the exposure meter geometry!
The gray card has to reflect 18% of incident light because that is assumed as standard motive by the built in camera light meter. Using a medium gray paper sheet might be sufficient - check if it has roughly 2.5 EV higher exposure  than a white paper (85-90 % reflectivity). Maybe printing a gray card is possible until a gray card arrives from some supplier?!
Here a good explanatory text http://www.benjohnstonphotography.com/understand/greycard/greycard.html - this guy uses the same method without gray card: "used" asphalt / bitumen road surfaces!
Most used tools: EOS 200D + EF-S 60mm + 4.0 / 70-200 IS AND/OR EOS 5D i  + 4.0 70-200 IS + 2.8 100 Macro

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Re: Exposing when the subject is both dark and white?
« Reply #16 on: October 01, 2017, 10:29:21 AM »