December 15, 2017, 06:54:47 PM

Author Topic: Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens 4k video sample on 5D MKIV?  (Read 614 times)

JRPhotos

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Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens 4k video sample on 5D MKIV?
« on: December 02, 2017, 08:15:43 PM »
I recorded some video clips of the family decorating the Christmas tree today in 4k on my 5DMK IV Canon 54 1.4II and iPhone 8 Plus.

The video quality is leaps and bounds better on the Canon (obviously). I want to do more with my Canon without the lens motor noise. I'm looking at the Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens; does anyone know of any 4k video recorded with this lens on the 5D MKIV? I haven't had any success finding any.

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Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens 4k video sample on 5D MKIV?
« on: December 02, 2017, 08:15:43 PM »

tolusina

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Re: Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens 4k video sample on 5D MKIV?
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2017, 09:13:04 AM »
The Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM makes motor noise when focusing, an annoying squeaky, buzzing noise that can be heard and felt.
STM lenses are totally 'focus by wire', there's no mechanical linkage between the focusing ring and the focusing elements.
The focusing ring is a switch/position encoder thing-a-mabob, focusing is always motor driven whether auto or manual..

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aceflibble

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Re: Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens 4k video sample on 5D MKIV?
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2017, 08:25:45 AM »
The 40mm STM isn't any quieter than the common USM lenses. In fact compared to some higher-end USM zooms, it's a lot noisier.

'STM' is just Canon's new marketing for focus-by-wire. Focus-by-wire is great for repeating pre-programmed focus racking, but for guessing focus it's jerkier than USM, and it is far from silent. The elements still have to move into place and as the shells of the STM lenses tend to be of lower quality than higher-end USM lenses, you can hear the internals moving around much more clearly. The 24-105 STM is the quietest Canon EF lens for video, and even that is only a hair quieter than USM and again, only with preset racking. (The 18-55 STM is actually the quietest overall, but that's an EF-S lens and so won't work on the 5D4.)

The various f/2.8 L zooms are the quietest EF USM lenses Canon make and are on par with the best STM lenses in terms of noise. One set of the older USM primes are also very quiet (20mm f/1.8, 50mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.8, and 100mm f/2) but their focus is also a little inaccurate and optically they're all over the place. (Very sharp at f/4 onwards; any wider and they're so soft it's like a layer of vaseline has been smeared all over them.)

But either way, neither STM nor USM lenses are silent and you will always hear them if you're recording through the camera's own mic. USM lenses make less noise as they travel but a bigger 'thump' when they arrive and stop at the focus point as well as often a slight dragging sound when they first start moving focus; STM lenses make more noise as they rack through their focus range but don't make any additional noise at the start or end of operation. The other trade is that STM lenses will usually find focus during video quicker (so they're making a touch more noise when searching, but search for less time) while USM is optimised for stills speed and can take a little longer with video. (So it's making less noise, but doing so for longer.)

Tamron's latest lenses are very quiet and focus well with video, plus are all weather-sealed and have VC, but they're still not totally silent and the focus can be just a hair slower than Canon's own lenses.

If video is important to you, you're better off either using a system designed primarily for it (Panasonics, for example, are primarily geared toward video while also offering decent stills) where quiet lenses are more common, or record audio only through an external microphone; a hotshoe-mounted shotgun mic is often enough to get clear sound while ignoring any noise from the lens.

You can mitigate—but not entirely avoid—lens noise by turning down the mic's sensitivity. If you have audio levels set automatically then the camera will turn up the volume of anything quiet, making lens noise worse. If you have the sensitivity or overall levels turned up manually then you'll also be picking up more unwanted noise. Keeping volume as low as possible (whether that's by turning down sensitivity or by simply reducing all levels flat depends on whether you're using the internal mic, external recorder, etc) will minimise how much lens noise is recorded. Of course, editing the audio to remove all noise when there are no sounds you want, either manually or via a noise gate filter, can also make a huge difference and is something you should get used to doing if you're going to be recording a lot of video. (It always strikes me as odd that so many people get into video expecting to only worry about the picture and avoid doing any audio editing, when sound is so very important.)

 
tl;dr version: If you're sticking with the 5D4, look at getting a hotshoe shotgun mic, make sure to set your levels manually, and check out the 24-105 STM, the f/2.8 USM zooms, or get a lens with a good manual focus ring. If you want to stay with Canon but are willing to shift bodies, an APS-C body with the 18-55 STM lens  and a shotgun mic can be a slight improvement again over the 5D4. (The 7D3, due within the next few months, is expected to have good 4K recording.) If all that sounds too much to you or you're not tied to Canon anyway, look into the Panasonic GH cameras; Fujifilm also make several mirrorless bodies with nice 4K recording and very quietly-focusing lenses, though their internal mics are awful so you'd want to use an external hotshoe mic with them anyway.
There is no lens which will by itself provide silent operation on a 5D4.

bereninga

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Re: Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens 4k video sample on 5D MKIV?
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2017, 12:24:55 PM »
The 40mm STM isn't any quieter than the common USM lenses. In fact compared to some higher-end USM zooms, it's a lot noisier.

'STM' is just Canon's new marketing for focus-by-wire. Focus-by-wire is great for repeating pre-programmed focus racking, but for guessing focus it's jerkier than USM, and it is far from silent. The elements still have to move into place and as the shells of the STM lenses tend to be of lower quality than higher-end USM lenses, you can hear the internals moving around much more clearly. The 24-105 STM is the quietest Canon EF lens for video, and even that is only a hair quieter than USM and again, only with preset racking. (The 18-55 STM is actually the quietest overall, but that's an EF-S lens and so won't work on the 5D4.)

The various f/2.8 L zooms are the quietest EF USM lenses Canon make and are on par with the best STM lenses in terms of noise. One set of the older USM primes are also very quiet (20mm f/1.8, 50mm f/1.4, 85mm f/1.8, and 100mm f/2) but their focus is also a little inaccurate and optically they're all over the place. (Very sharp at f/4 onwards; any wider and they're so soft it's like a layer of vaseline has been smeared all over them.)

But either way, neither STM nor USM lenses are silent and you will always hear them if you're recording through the camera's own mic. USM lenses make less noise as they travel but a bigger 'thump' when they arrive and stop at the focus point as well as often a slight dragging sound when they first start moving focus; STM lenses make more noise as they rack through their focus range but don't make any additional noise at the start or end of operation. The other trade is that STM lenses will usually find focus during video quicker (so they're making a touch more noise when searching, but search for less time) while USM is optimised for stills speed and can take a little longer with video. (So it's making less noise, but doing so for longer.)

Tamron's latest lenses are very quiet and focus well with video, plus are all weather-sealed and have VC, but they're still not totally silent and the focus can be just a hair slower than Canon's own lenses.

If video is important to you, you're better off either using a system designed primarily for it (Panasonics, for example, are primarily geared toward video while also offering decent stills) where quiet lenses are more common, or record audio only through an external microphone; a hotshoe-mounted shotgun mic is often enough to get clear sound while ignoring any noise from the lens.

You can mitigate—but not entirely avoid—lens noise by turning down the mic's sensitivity. If you have audio levels set automatically then the camera will turn up the volume of anything quiet, making lens noise worse. If you have the sensitivity or overall levels turned up manually then you'll also be picking up more unwanted noise. Keeping volume as low as possible (whether that's by turning down sensitivity or by simply reducing all levels flat depends on whether you're using the internal mic, external recorder, etc) will minimise how much lens noise is recorded. Of course, editing the audio to remove all noise when there are no sounds you want, either manually or via a noise gate filter, can also make a huge difference and is something you should get used to doing if you're going to be recording a lot of video. (It always strikes me as odd that so many people get into video expecting to only worry about the picture and avoid doing any audio editing, when sound is so very important.)

 
tl;dr version: If you're sticking with the 5D4, look at getting a hotshoe shotgun mic, make sure to set your levels manually, and check out the 24-105 STM, the f/2.8 USM zooms, or get a lens with a good manual focus ring. If you want to stay with Canon but are willing to shift bodies, an APS-C body with the 18-55 STM lens  and a shotgun mic can be a slight improvement again over the 5D4. (The 7D3, due within the next few months, is expected to have good 4K recording.) If all that sounds too much to you or you're not tied to Canon anyway, look into the Panasonic GH cameras; Fujifilm also make several mirrorless bodies with nice 4K recording and very quietly-focusing lenses, though their internal mics are awful so you'd want to use an external hotshoe mic with them anyway.
There is no lens which will by itself provide silent operation on a 5D4.

This is an extremely insightful and useful post. Thanks so much for sharing all of this knowledge!

For me, I might look into a compact shotgun mic some time. Seems to solve the issue of lens AF noise across the board.

One thing that folks might not know is that the Canon EOS M6 has focus peaking, which seems to me something they should've added to the 5DIV. But that is off-topic. :)

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Re: Canon EF 40mm f/2.8 STM Lens 4k video sample on 5D MKIV?
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2017, 12:24:55 PM »