April 22, 2018, 10:48:54 AM

Author Topic: Off Brand: Panasonic Announces the Ultimate Hybrid DSLM With New 10.2MP High Sensitivity MOS sensor  (Read 5525 times)

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Introducing the LUMIX GH5S: Exceptional Mirrorless Videography and Photography, designed and developed for professional filmmakers

  • Introducing a newly developed 10.2MP High Sensitivity MOS sensor for enhanced image quality in low light: Allowing up to 51,200 ISO recording without extended ISO.
  • Time Code IN/OUT for easy synchronization of multiple cameras and Dual Native ISO, providing low range (400) and high range (2,500) ISO environments.
  • True “Multi-Aspect Ratio” Function in Both Photo and Video

Las Vegas, NV (January 8, 2018) – Panasonic is proud to introduce the new hybrid Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera LUMIX GH5S with expanded video recording capability and enhanced image quality. Designed and developed for professional filmmakers, the LUMIX GH5S achieves highest-ever image sensitivity and video image quality in the history of LUMIX cameras, especially in low-light situations.

Packed with big features to satisfy demanding photographers and videographers alike The new 10.2-megapixel Digital MOS Sensor with Dual Native ISO Technology and Venus Engine 10 faithfully reproduce even dark parts of the image, allowing high ISO capture when the use of supplemental lighting may not be possible. This sensor is a multi-aspect type with a sufficient margin for realizing the same angle of view in 4:3,17:9,16:9 and 3:2 aspect ratios. The sensor also enables photo shooting in 14-bit RAW format, providing higher flexibility for professional RAW stills development workflows. When shooting in dark environments, videographers can now focus on filming that perfect shot as they no longer need to worry about noise which often results from having to use higher ISOs. The Dual Native ISO Technology suppresses noise to produce cleaner footage when taken in all light. Both videographers and photographers can now enjoy the same diagonal field of view across all aspect ratios with the True “Multi-Aspect Ratio” Function. This feature means you can easily swap between difference aspect ratios giving you the accuracy you want from your lenses, and making the process easier while producing and editing in post-production. The LUMIX GH5S is compatible with Time Code IN and OUT, like the professional camcorders, which is easy to set using the flash sync terminal and bundled conversion cable for a standard BNC terminal. This is especially important for “lip synchronization” when using multiple cameras. The LUMIX GH5S can be used as Time Code generator for other GH5S cameras and professional camcorders. The Time Code IN/OUT functionality makes a production teams job pain-free as it provides synchronization for both video and audio devices used on multi-cam productions.

The LUMIX GH5 achieved 4KUHD 60p video recording for the first time as a digital mirrorless camera in 2017.2 The new LUMIX GH5S establishes a new milestone by realizing the world’s first 4K 60p video recording in Cinema 4K (4096×2160), 3 capable of internal 4:2:2 10-bit video recording up to Cinema 4K30p and internal 4:2:0 8-bit Cinema 4K60p. subsampling commonly used for film production, for even more faithful color reproduction.4 The LUMIX GH5S also records 4:2:2 10-bit 400-Mbps All-Intra in 4K 30p/25p/24p and 200- Mbps All-Intra in Full-HD.

Continuing the LUMIX GH tradition, there is no time limit for both Full-HD and 4K video recording. The LUMIX GH5S complies with 4K HDR video with Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) mode in Photo Style. A low-bit-rate recording mode, 4K HEVC for HLG, is available. This enables playback on AV equipment compatible with the HLG Display format, such as Panasonic 4K HDR TVs.

The VFR (Variable Frame Rate) function lets users record overcranked (time-lapse) and undercranked (slo-mo) video in C4K/4K (60 fps, maximum 2.5x slower) and FHD (240 fps, maximum 10x slower). A V-LogL and Rec.709 LUT (Look Up Table) are pre-installed in the camera, so users can play videos recorded in V-LogL without having to separately purchase a Software Upgrade Key. Four additional LUTs can be installed using the Panasonic Varicam (.VLT) file format.

DFD (Depth From Defocus) technology and ultra-high-speed digital signal processing achieve fast auto focusing of approximately 0.07 sec 6 with 12 fps (AFS) / 8 fps (AFC) in 12- bit RAW and 10 (AFS) / 7 (AFC) fps in 14-bit RAW high-speed burst shooting. In addition to a total of 225 focus areas, The options for Face/Eye Recognition, Tracking AF, 1-area AF and Pinpoint AF are available for precise focusing. The 4K PHOTO enables 60 fps high-speed capture in approximately 8-megapixel equivalent resolution.

Achieve outstanding footage in any environment, especially in low light As a camera that excels in shooting in low light, the LUMIX GH5S boasts -5EV luminance detection performance with Low Light AF thanks to the higher sensitivity and optimized tuning of the sensor. Live Boost is another practical feature that makes it possible to check the composition even in total darkness, by boosting the sensitivity just for Live View. The magnification ratio in MF assist is increased from conventional 10x to 20x, which is convenient especially for astronomical photography. An AF Point Scope function, first introduced in the Lumix G9 and Night mode are also integrated.

In order to make the GH5S tough enough to withstand even heavy field use, it is composed of a magnesium alloy full die-cast front, rear and top frame that is not only splashproof7 and dustproof but also freezeproof down to -10 degrees Celsius. The GH5S is equipped with a double SD Memory Card slot, compatible with the high-speed, high-capacity UHS-II and Video Speed Class 90. Users can flexibly choose the recording method from Relay Recording, Backup Recording or Allocation Recording. The HDMI Type A terminal is provided, along with the USB-C Gen1 interface.

Exceptional image capture without concern The GH5S has a large LVF (Live View Finder) with a stunningly high magnification ratio of approximately 1.52x/0.76x (35mm camera equivalent) providing smooth display at 120 fps. A high-precision, high-speed OLED (Organic Light-Emitting Diode) display features 3,680K-dot resolution and 100% field of view. In addition to dual dials, an omni-directional joystick enables more intuitive and flexible operation.

The GH5S includes Bluetooth and Wi-Fi® connectivity to offer a more flexible shooting experience and instant image sharing with easy operation. Compatibility with Bluetooth 4.2 (called BLE: Bluetooth Low Energy) enables constant connection with a smartphone/tablet with minimum power consumption. For Wi-Fi, 5 GHz (IEEE802.11ac)8 can be selected in addition to the conventional 2.4 GHz (IEEE 802.11b/g/n) for an even more secure and stable connection.

For extended battery life and a more stable hold, the new Battery Grip DMW-BGGH5 (sold separately) is available. The XLR Microphone Adaptor DMW-XLR1 (sold separately) allows high-res sound recording with an external XLR microphone.9

The Panasonic LUMIX GH5s will be available from end of February 2 and will retail for $2499 (body only).

*1 RAW files are in 14-bit even when 12-bit is selected.  *2 4K 60p/50p(for a Digital Single Lens Mirrorless Camera), 4:2:2 10-bit (for a digital interchangeable lens camera) as of 4 January, 2017  *3 As of January 8, 2018 as a Digital Single Lens Mirrorless camera that complies with 4K (4096×2160) resolution defined by Digital Cinema Initiatives(DCI). According to a Panasonic study.  *4 4:2:0 8-bit in C4K 60p and 4K 60p recording on an SD Memory Card.  *5 Contrast AF with DFD Technology works only with Panasonic Micro Four Thirds lenses. *6 In AFS, at wide-end with H-ES12060 (CIPA) when LVF display speed is set to 120fps.  *7 Splash Proof is a term used to describe an extra level of protection this camera offers against exposure to a minimal amount of moisture, water or dust. Splash Proof does not guarantee that damage will not occur if this camera is subjected to direct contact with water.  *8 5GHz Wi-Fi is not available in some countries.  *9 In MOV only

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neuroanatomist

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Video folks, please explain to this stills only guy why this is / is not a big deal, thx.

Canon doesn't have one.  Canon is doomed.   ;)
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BasXcanon

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Canon doesn't have one.  Canon is doomed.   ;)

Yes we need a Canon M6S with 3 MP and 1080P Bats vision ASAP-
Let's start a new poll to demand the M6S from Canon!

3kramd5

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I’m so tired of “the ultimate” as a superlative.

Mikehit

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After nearly a month of rumours and announcements I still can't work out who this camera is aimed at.
At its core I guess it is the 10MP that stumps me - if 10MP is enough for professional video use it says a lot about the chase for MP and high resolution.

Apparently the have also stripped out IBIS due to technical requirements which is the most interesting move.

bhf3737

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The GH5 and the newer GH5s have almost everything that one wants from a 4K video camera on paper, such as high bit rate, lots of video friendly features, unlimited record time, and do not suffer from overheating. But they have a few shortcomings:
1. GH5 cannot auto focus efficiently in video, even with native lenses, no matter what mode you use. So you usually have to settle down to manual focus. Therefore, for moving subjects you need to baby sit it rather than set it and forget it. It is miles away from the AF performance you get from Canon's DPAF sensors, e.g. XF400 camera. There is no explanation whether this is improved in the GH5s.
2. Many of the viewers and NLEs still cannot view and edit 10bit, 400mbps footage because of both hardware and software limitations. This is not a GH5 fault though.
3. For high bit rate you need at least V60 rated SD cards to write to, i.e. higher operation cost.
4. In GH5 anything above ISO 1600 is grainy and usually unusable. That is the main reason that GH5s is invented.
5. They both do not have ND filter built-in so external ND is the only option for those who want bokeh in bright sun.

So in short  they are both capable video cameras that you cannot live with them and without them!!   
« Last Edit: January 08, 2018, 06:05:17 PM by bhf3737 »

gsealy

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The GH5 and the newer GH5s have almost everything that one wants from a 4K video camera on paper, such as high bit rate, lots of video friendly features, unlimited record time, and do not suffer from overheating. But they have a few shortcomings:
1. GH5 cannot auto focus efficiently in video, even with native lenses, no matter what mode you use. So you usually have to settle down to manual focus. Therefore, for moving subjects you need to baby sit it rather than set it and forget it. It is miles away from the AF performance you get from Canon's DPAF sensors, e.g. XF400 camera. There is no explanation whether this is improved in the GH5s.
2. Many of the viewers and NLEs still cannot view and edit 10bit, 400mbps footage because of both hardware and software limitations. This is not a GH5 fault though.
3. For high bit rate you need at least V60 rated SD cards to write to, i.e. higher operation cost.
4. In GH5 anything above ISO 1600 is grainy and usually unusable. That is the main reason that GH5s is invented.
5. They both do not have ND filter built-in so external ND is the only option for those who want bokeh in bright sun.

So in short  they are both capable video cameras that you cannot live with them and without them!!   

I am not defending the GH5s AF.  But the thing is you can't do a "set it and forget it" when it comes to AF.  Two things happen even with Canon DPAF: 1.) you can get annoying hunting with some of the lens, and 2.) the camera might decide it wants to focus on something other than you want.  Then your video is in big trouble.  I prefer to acquire initial focus using AF, and then immediately turn it off.  Then I know the camera won't do something I do not want it to do.  Also, I can reframe the shot away from the focus area.  I do this with my  Canon Cinema cameras and the 5DIIIs.  Yes, there are some situations when continuous AF is a nice thing such as when the subject is moving toward or away from you.  But these can also be handled many times in more traditional ways such as figuring out the DOF beforehand or using focus pull.  The bottom line with continuous AF is that you can't assume that the camera is thinking like you do.

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Sharlin

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At its core I guess it is the 10MP that stumps me - if 10MP is enough for professional video use it says a lot about the chase for MP and high resolution.

Well, for video there's little need for more resolution than what the output is going to be. 4K is 8Mpix; anything more would just require more processing power, generate more heat, and possibly introduce moiré/aliasing artifacts from downsampling.

Mikehit

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At its core I guess it is the 10MP that stumps me - if 10MP is enough for professional video use it says a lot about the chase for MP and high resolution.

Well, for video there's little need for more resolution than what the output is going to be. 4K is 8Mpix; anything more would just require more processing power, generate more heat, and possibly introduce moiré/aliasing artifacts from downsampling.

So what you are saying is that they have produced a purely video oriented camera as opposed to an excellent combined tool for photo/video.
Market segmentation, eh?  Stupid Panasonic.

privatebydesign

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At its core I guess it is the 10MP that stumps me - if 10MP is enough for professional video use it says a lot about the chase for MP and high resolution.

Well, for video there's little need for more resolution than what the output is going to be. 4K is 8Mpix; anything more would just require more processing power, generate more heat, and possibly introduce moiré/aliasing artifacts from downsampling.

Yet all the time we are told delivered 1080 processed from shot 4K is “much crisper and higher quality” than native 1080 capture. Indeed it is one of the main reasons people give for demanding 4K from everything.
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, DR, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

Sharlin

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Well, for video there's little need for more resolution than what the output is going to be. 4K is 8Mpix; anything more would just require more processing power, generate more heat, and possibly introduce moiré/aliasing artifacts from downsampling.

Yet all the time we are told delivered 1080 processed from shot 4K is “much crisper and higher quality” than native 1080 capture. Indeed it is one of the main reasons people give for demanding 4K from everything.

I do believe there is some truth to that: if you have enough resolution to get 4:1 supersampling (2x2 input pixels to 1 output pixel) then that can actually improve quality, when you do it in post, using a non-realtime high quality resampling algorithm. But doing the same for 4K would require a 8K≈32Mpix sensor and the corresponding amount of processing power, cooling, and storage bandwidth. Not remotely feasible currently in this form factor and price class.

bhf3737

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I am not defending the GH5s AF.  But the thing is you can't do a "set it and forget it" when it comes to AF.  Two things happen even with Canon DPAF: 1.) you can get annoying hunting with some of the lens, and 2.) the camera might decide it wants to focus on something other than you want.  Then your video is in big trouble.  I prefer to acquire initial focus using AF, and then immediately turn it off.  Then I know the camera won't do something I do not want it to do.  Also, I can reframe the shot away from the focus area.  I do this with my  Canon Cinema cameras and the 5DIIIs.  Yes, there are some situations when continuous AF is a nice thing such as when the subject is moving toward or away from you.  But these can also be handled many times in more traditional ways such as figuring out the DOF beforehand or using focus pull.  The bottom line with continuous AF is that you can't assume that the camera is thinking like you do.

Well it all depends on your use-case. Mine is recording classical concerts with two cameras from the back of hall. I use a XF400 and a C200. The first one takes on the whole stage and the second one is used for selective shots. I used GH5 in the place of C200 for a while and justification was that I might get better dynamic range because of extremely dark and bright stage. But GH5 was awful in acquiring focus for selective shots and was hunting a lot even with the native lenses using any imaginable mode and setting. Replacing GH5 with C200 has totally removed this hindrance. Now focus is always crisp on the performer's face and it can be changed with a single touch. I could do the same with two XF400 as well, if cost was an issue. 
Don't take me wrong. GH5 is a very good video camera for a limited set of use cases (i.e. mostly handheld manually focused slow moving and isolated subjects in good light). It is not good for concerts, head-shot interviews that the subject moves, selfie video when the subject moves towards or away from camera, kids soccer game, etc. All because of the AF issues. It is well received by filmmakers who do not want/use AF anyway.       

transpo1

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Video folks, please explain to this stills only guy why this is / is not a big deal, thx.

Canon doesn't have one.  Canon is doomed.   ;)

Not doomed but they are leaving money on the table. Between the GH5/GH5s and the upcoming A7SIII, a lot of cameras will be sold. To the 4K video segment.

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transpo1

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I am not defending the GH5s AF.  But the thing is you can't do a "set it and forget it" when it comes to AF.  Two things happen even with Canon DPAF: 1.) you can get annoying hunting with some of the lens, and 2.) the camera might decide it wants to focus on something other than you want.  Then your video is in big trouble.  I prefer to acquire initial focus using AF, and then immediately turn it off.  Then I know the camera won't do something I do not want it to do.  Also, I can reframe the shot away from the focus area.  I do this with my  Canon Cinema cameras and the 5DIIIs.  Yes, there are some situations when continuous AF is a nice thing such as when the subject is moving toward or away from you.  But these can also be handled many times in more traditional ways such as figuring out the DOF beforehand or using focus pull.  The bottom line with continuous AF is that you can't assume that the camera is thinking like you do.

Well it all depends on your use-case. Mine is recording classical concerts with two cameras from the back of hall. I use a XF400 and a C200. The first one takes on the whole stage and the second one is used for selective shots. I used GH5 in the place of C200 for a while and justification was that I might get better dynamic range because of extremely dark and bright stage. But GH5 was awful in acquiring focus for selective shots and was hunting a lot even with the native lenses using any imaginable mode and setting. Replacing GH5 with C200 has totally removed this hindrance. Now focus is always crisp on the performer's face and it can be changed with a single touch. I could do the same with two XF400 as well, if cost was an issue. 
Don't take me wrong. GH5 is a very good video camera for a limited set of use cases (i.e. mostly handheld manually focused slow moving and isolated subjects in good light). It is not good for concerts, head-shot interviews that the subject moves, selfie video when the subject moves towards or away from camera, kids soccer game, etc. All because of the AF issues. It is well received by filmmakers who do not want/use AF anyway.     

Canon’s DPAF is light years ahead of Panasonic. Which is why it would be nice if they made a product like the GH5 or GH5s.

transpo1

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Well, for video there's little need for more resolution than what the output is going to be. 4K is 8Mpix; anything more would just require more processing power, generate more heat, and possibly introduce moiré/aliasing artifacts from downsampling.

Yet all the time we are told delivered 1080 processed from shot 4K is “much crisper and higher quality” than native 1080 capture. Indeed it is one of the main reasons people give for demanding 4K from everything.

I do believe there is some truth to that: if you have enough resolution to get 4:1 supersampling (2x2 input pixels to 1 output pixel) then that can actually improve quality, when you do it in post, using a non-realtime high quality resampling algorithm. But doing the same for 4K would require a 8K≈32Mpix sensor and the corresponding amount of processing power, cooling, and storage bandwidth. Not remotely feasible currently in this form factor and price class.

To clarify for privatebydesign, many video clients now require 4K acquisition for 1080p finishing or 4K finishing, so higher resolution, greater than Full HD is required for many pro jobs. Indeed, in RED world, 5K or 6K is often shot to finish in 4K. The point is that 4K is becoming the norm for anyone trying to compete for pro work and clients in a competitive market.

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