June 25, 2018, 12:44:25 AM

Author Topic: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s  (Read 14803 times)

Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2018, 12:10:50 PM »
Way way back when I had a 40D, I decided to go FF.  I knew that I needed 1.6X the focal length to get the same compositions, so I started replacing my lenses with FF.  A 16-35mm f/4L works for both, a 24-105mm L a 70-200, and so on.

Any high zoom ratio lens like a 18-135 is a severe quality compromise, so don't worry about replacing it.

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #30 on: March 10, 2018, 12:10:50 PM »

Valvebounce

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #31 on: March 10, 2018, 08:02:46 PM »
Hi Duct Taper.
I can’t speak to the IQ improvement yet, I only just bought the STM version to upgrade Angela’s kit, but I can say the leap from the AF of the version II to the AF of the STM Lens is phenomenal.
The speed improvement is incredible, from 16ft to near minimal focal length the STM takes a small fraction of the time of the grumbling version II, (I’d estimate it at 1/8 to 1/12th of the time) it also seems to be more positive about the point of best focus and the AI Servo tracking seems far superior too.
The comparisons were made sequentially on the same 100D body and were not particularly scientific, the targets being a kitchen cupboard door knob (far) and the edge of the door frame (near) and an estimation of the distance at 16ft and as such these are just my feelings of the performance of the lenses.

Cheers, Graham.

I highly recommend the EF-S 55-250mm IS STM if you're going to get the 80D. It's a massive upgrade over the non-STM version in terms of IQ and offers very good value for money.

7DII+Grip, 1DsIII, 7D+Grip, 40D+Grip, EF 24-105 f4L EF-S 17-85, EF-S 10-22, EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS II, EF 1.4xIII, 2xIII, EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6l IS II, Σ17-70 f2.8-4 C, EF 50mm f1.8, YN600EX-RT, YN-E3-RT, Filters, Remotes, Macro tubes, Tripods, heads etc!

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Talys

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #32 on: March 12, 2018, 01:24:35 AM »
Any high zoom ratio lens like a 18-135 is a severe quality compromise, so don't worry about replacing it.

Couldn't agree more.  It just ins't possible to get L quality output from a lens with such a large focal range and such a small size and weight.  But the 18-135 USM is still a really nice lens to complement the 80D :)

Duct_Taper

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #33 on: March 12, 2018, 11:24:45 AM »
Any high zoom ratio lens like a 18-135 is a severe quality compromise, so don't worry about replacing it.

Couldn't agree more.  It just ins't possible to get L quality output from a lens with such a large focal range and such a small size and weight.  But the 18-135 USM is still a really nice lens to complement the 80D :)

Definitely understood... however, the 18-135 currently gets used a LOT for outdoor adventures with the kid.  IQ is *good enough* and the flexibility of the zoom range means I get a fair number of shots that would otherwise require bringing & swapping between two lenses...

Body-wise, I looked again at A7 III vs 6D II for what I'm looking for and it seems to come down to:

A7 III advantages:
- 10fps
- 40/89 shot RAW buffer
- silent shooting
- IBIS
- dual card slots

6D II advantages
- OVF
- low-light AF (the Sony is rated to the same LV -3 but anecdotally DSLRs are still better in low-light)
- UI -> fully articulated touchscreen plus Canon menus, etc
- GPS
- fully works with my EF lenses and Canon accessories (lighting, etc)
- fits in with my existing post processing workflow

Everything else is close enough to be equal as far as I'm concerned.  So despite the incredible spec sheet of the A7 III, it's definitely not the home run it would seem to be over the 6D II, at least for me...

yjchua95

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #34 on: March 12, 2018, 11:38:07 PM »
Any high zoom ratio lens like a 18-135 is a severe quality compromise, so don't worry about replacing it.

Couldn't agree more.  It just ins't possible to get L quality output from a lens with such a large focal range and such a small size and weight.  But the 18-135 USM is still a really nice lens to complement the 80D :)

Definitely understood... however, the 18-135 currently gets used a LOT for outdoor adventures with the kid.  IQ is *good enough* and the flexibility of the zoom range means I get a fair number of shots that would otherwise require bringing & swapping between two lenses...

Body-wise, I looked again at A7 III vs 6D II for what I'm looking for and it seems to come down to:

A7 III advantages:
- 10fps
- 40/89 shot RAW buffer
- silent shooting
- IBIS
- dual card slots

6D II advantages
- OVF
- low-light AF (the Sony is rated to the same LV -3 but anecdotally DSLRs are still better in low-light)
- UI -> fully articulated touchscreen plus Canon menus, etc
- GPS
- fully works with my EF lenses and Canon accessories (lighting, etc)
- fits in with my existing post processing workflow

Everything else is close enough to be equal as far as I'm concerned.  So despite the incredible spec sheet of the A7 III, it's definitely not the home run it would seem to be over the 6D II, at least for me...

The best camera is the one that you have in your hands.

I upgraded from a 60D (which was still serving me well) to a 6D Mk2 and am really happy with it.

If you want image quality samples, I've uploaded some photos I took with my 6D2 here for you to evaluate: https://1drv.ms/f/s!AkzrHH5MUh7tg-ld3G-azehKIHDh4w

I've been tempted by the A7 III, but I haven't found myself being limited by the DR of the 6D2 yet, and aside from the IQ of the A7 III, nothing else on it interests me. Canon's DPAF is excellent, and if you know how to make full use of the 45-point AF system on either the 80D or the 6D2, it performs pretty damn well.

Some were shot at pretty high ISO and still looked pretty good (you can view the EXIF data of each image). The birds were all shot with a Tamron 70-300 VC USD, while the close ups were shot with an EF 100 f/2.8L IS USM and wide-angle shots were done on a 24-70 f/4L IS USM.

That being said, I think you can't go wrong with the 80D and it might end up suiting you better. High ISO performance on the 80D is a hell of a lot better than on my 60D, and I rarely find myself needing to push above ISO 3200.

Also, you mentioned that you were interested in shooting wildlife. I highly recommend the EF-S 55-250mm IS STM if you're going to get the 80D. It's a massive upgrade over the non-STM version in terms of IQ and offers very good value for money.

That being said, the A7 III packs a lot of sorcery inside it, and if you get a Sigma MC-11 EF to E-mount adapter, PDAF and Eye-AF will still work like magic on the Sony.

You forgot to mention ergonomics too, it's usually better on DSLRs.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 12:17:02 AM by yjchua95 »
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Dynamic range limitations? Who needs 12 stops of DR?

Talys

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #35 on: March 13, 2018, 12:55:36 AM »
A7 III advantages:
- 10fps
- 40/89 shot RAW buffer
- silent shooting
- IBIS
- dual card slots


I am playing with an A7R3 right now, and I have to mention the fine print....

- 10fps is only in Hi+ drive mode.  But Sony recommends you use Hi, which is 8 fps... because in Hi+, what you see on the display/viewfinder is not real time (!!).  So, 10fps, as long as your action scene doesn't require that you move the camera.

- Silent shooting has turned into a dud for me.  I thought it would be cool because hummingbirds sometimes fly off with shutter noise.  The problem?  IQ is lower, and very notably, distortion.  It can be pretty awful.  Sony recommends that you turn it off for high speed shooting. 

I guess if I did weddings or whatever, there might be a use.  But it is disappointing.

- IBIS sounds great.  Except I've been using the GMaster 70-200 and 100-400 (with OSS too), and the IS difference is not noticeable.  Maybe it's just my perception.

There's another major pro for Canon, by the way.  All the high-end lenses are mechanical focus, so you can grab it and twist it.  All the high-end Sony lenses are focus by wire and require you to do stupid things (like push a button) before you MF.  In addition, the rotation to take you from minimum zoom to maximum zoom, and from MFD to infinity both take much more effort, and you can't jump from one end to the other nearly as quickly.

If low light matters to you, you can purchase a flash or the Yongnuo version of the ST-E3, and autofocus in everything up to pitch black is instant on a Canon 6D2.  On the Sony, two things are gimpy:

- If you're in a room lit by something like a fireplace, forget it.  You'll never get autofocus.

- If you set aperture smaller than f/8, the camera only supports contrast detection autofocus.  Which is about as fun as Nikon live view autofocusing.  I'm not talking about the minimum aperture (eg due to extenders or what not) -- I mean the aperture that you set.  This actually screws me over on portraiture, as my go-to apertures can be up to f/11 with studio strobes.

On the other side of it all, the Sony stuff you didn't mention that I find really noteworthy:

- Eye AF is very good and works with most adapted lenses in the portraiture sweet spot of focal lengths (it falls apart with adapted telephotos, including at the far end of the 70-200).

- APSC crop mode is pretty awesome.

- The grip is retardedly expensive ($300!!!!).  The Sony one is also very heavy, and the only third-party one at the moment is junk.  But if you buy an A7iii, you pretty much have to buy a grip, because otherwise, it's an ergonomic nightmare.  On the bright side, you now have the footprint of approximately a DSLR... but you actually have a very decent portrait orientation grip, without adding further bulk/weight.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 01:00:12 AM by Talys »

Isaacheus

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #36 on: March 13, 2018, 04:34:45 AM »
A7 III advantages:
- 10fps
- 40/89 shot RAW buffer
- silent shooting
- IBIS
- dual card slots


I am playing with an A7R3 right now, and I have to mention the fine print....

- 10fps is only in Hi+ drive mode.  But Sony recommends you use Hi, which is 8 fps... because in Hi+, what you see on the display/viewfinder is not real time (!!).  So, 10fps, as long as your action scene doesn't require that you move the camera.

- Silent shooting has turned into a dud for me.  I thought it would be cool because hummingbirds sometimes fly off with shutter noise.  The problem?  IQ is lower, and very notably, distortion.  It can be pretty awful.  Sony recommends that you turn it off for high speed shooting. 

I guess if I did weddings or whatever, there might be a use.  But it is disappointing.

- IBIS sounds great.  Except I've been using the GMaster 70-200 and 100-400 (with OSS too), and the IS difference is not noticeable.  Maybe it's just my perception.

There's another major pro for Canon, by the way.  All the high-end lenses are mechanical focus, so you can grab it and twist it.  All the high-end Sony lenses are focus by wire and require you to do stupid things (like push a button) before you MF.  In addition, the rotation to take you from minimum zoom to maximum zoom, and from MFD to infinity both take much more effort, and you can't jump from one end to the other nearly as quickly.

If low light matters to you, you can purchase a flash or the Yongnuo version of the ST-E3, and autofocus in everything up to pitch black is instant on a Canon 6D2.  On the Sony, two things are gimpy:

- If you're in a room lit by something like a fireplace, forget it.  You'll never get autofocus.

- If you set aperture smaller than f/8, the camera only supports contrast detection autofocus.  Which is about as fun as Nikon live view autofocusing.  I'm not talking about the minimum aperture (eg due to extenders or what not) -- I mean the aperture that you set.  This actually screws me over on portraiture, as my go-to apertures can be up to f/11 with studio strobes.

On the other side of it all, the Sony stuff you didn't mention that I find really noteworthy:

- Eye AF is very good and works with most adapted lenses in the portraiture sweet spot of focal lengths (it falls apart with adapted telephotos, including at the far end of the 70-200).

- APSC crop mode is pretty awesome.

- The grip is retardedly expensive ($300!!!!).  The Sony one is also very heavy, and the only third-party one at the moment is junk.  But if you buy an A7iii, you pretty much have to buy a grip, because otherwise, it's an ergonomic nightmare.  On the bright side, you now have the footprint of approximately a DSLR... but you actually have a very decent portrait orientation grip, without adding further bulk/weight.

A couple of questions from your experience; with the silent shooting, what sort of iq difference have you found? Distortion is pretty typical with the non-stacked sensors, so that one is a given at this stage. I've heard mixed reports here, but haven't seen anything negative other than distortion on moving subjects in my use

With the f8 focusing, have you tried turning the exposure simulation off while shooting? You lose the wysiwyg but it seems to focus fine otherwise on mine? I believe that was the work around - it has it's own draw backs sure but that might help your situation/be worth a try

IBIS seems to be best suited for lenses without built in lens stabilisation I've found - I think it defers to the in-built lens one when it is aware of it (at least, that's what it does on my adapted lenses). With the sigma arts, it seems to work a treat so far

Can't comment on the rest as haven't been using native glass as a rule, apart from agreeing about eye- af, and the crop mode (super useful with the sigma 35mm art in video, makes it a 35 and 50mm in one)


For the OP; if you have any interest in video, the sony is a really good option here, for the different file formats etc. I don't think you could really go wrong with either the A73 or the 6dmk2 though as an upgrade, but I'd be hesitant to pay the current price of the 6dmk2 if I could avoid it. 

The other pros I'd put for the sony would be the evf, depending on what type of shooting you do and what you like to have in the view finder, and how customisable the buttons are on the Sony (which I find a pain on the 6d, smaller thing but menu diving for bracketing and having to press a few buttons for iso changes).

I'd put weather sealing on the canon 'pro' side, but I having lost a 6d to weather, I'd be hesitant to use either in a rain storm without cover. Not sure if that is a factor for what you're doing.

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #36 on: March 13, 2018, 04:34:45 AM »

Talys

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #37 on: March 13, 2018, 11:37:27 AM »
A couple of questions from your experience; with the silent shooting, what sort of iq difference have you found? Distortion is pretty typical with the non-stacked sensors, so that one is a given at this stage. I've heard mixed reports here, but haven't seen anything negative other than distortion on moving subjects in my use

Even on slowly moving subjects, though, silent shooting creates distortion -- and it's pretty trippy distortion :)  When I was fooling around with it, a trellis with vines on it gently swaying in the wind looked messed up on the silent-shoot version versus the non-silent.

Keep in mind that I was trying to photograph hummingbirds, and I do want to capture them in motion.  As I mentioned, I think it would be a nice tool for things like events where you're trying to be quiet, less so, when you're trying to be sneaky trying to capture animals in the moment :D

With the f8 focusing, have you tried turning the exposure simulation off while shooting? You lose the wysiwyg but it seems to focus fine otherwise on mine? I believe that was the work around - it has it's own draw backs sure but that might help your situation/be worth a try

I'm sure that you mean Live View  Display, Setting Effect On/Off, right?  When there's a lot of light, like outdoors, f/11 it isn't terrible anyways.

But the situation that I usually need it in is where it's not so bright, and I'm using flashes and strobes.  Imagine a room that's lit with a couple of 60W bulbs, for example.  In this case, what happens at f/8 is that autofocus works with minimal hunting.  In most cases, f/8 AF sounds like "tick".  In f/11, every single time the camera goes from defocused to focused, you can hear the AF motor go "tick-tick-tock" as it moves past the in-focus point, and then back to best focus.

The live View Display Setting Effect is absolutely critical for flash photography anyways, because otherwise, you either have an overexposed image... or you have no idea what you're photographing :D   It's a good implementation, IMO.

IBIS seems to be best suited for lenses without built in lens stabilisation I've found - I think it defers to the in-built lens one when it is aware of it (at least, that's what it does on my adapted lenses). With the sigma arts, it seems to work a treat so far

Can't comment on the rest as haven't been using native glass as a rule, apart from agreeing about eye- af, and the crop mode (super useful with the sigma 35mm art in video, makes it a 35 and 50mm in one)

I see.  I did not know this, thanks!

I'd put weather sealing on the canon 'pro' side, but I having lost a 6d to weather, I'd be hesitant to use either in a rain storm without cover. Not sure if that is a factor for what you're doing.

My biggest problem with the weather sealing, to be honest, is that the battery compartment has zero weather sealing (it's quite obvious if you flip open the door).  I use a blackrapid, so my camera is almost always upside down, so you can imagine my concern...

I do not know what the weather sealing situation is with the grip (since the battery door isn't exposed).  However, I would worry that water would travel down the grip, to a crevice, and through the door.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 11:40:20 AM by Talys »

Isaacheus

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #38 on: March 13, 2018, 03:54:06 PM »
A couple of questions from your experience; with the silent shooting, what sort of iq difference have you found? Distortion is pretty typical with the non-stacked sensors, so that one is a given at this stage. I've heard mixed reports here, but haven't seen anything negative other than distortion on moving subjects in my use

Even on slowly moving subjects, though, silent shooting creates distortion -- and it's pretty trippy distortion :)  When I was fooling around with it, a trellis with vines on it gently swaying in the wind looked messed up on the silent-shoot version versus the non-silent.

Keep in mind that I was trying to photograph hummingbirds, and I do want to capture them in motion.  As I mentioned, I think it would be a nice tool for things like events where you're trying to be quiet, less so, when you're trying to be sneaky trying to capture animals in the moment :D

With the f8 focusing, have you tried turning the exposure simulation off while shooting? You lose the wysiwyg but it seems to focus fine otherwise on mine? I believe that was the work around - it has it's own draw backs sure but that might help your situation/be worth a try

I'm sure that you mean Live View  Display, Setting Effect On/Off, right?  When there's a lot of light, like outdoors, f/11 it isn't terrible anyways.

But the situation that I usually need it in is where it's not so bright, and I'm using flashes and strobes.  Imagine a room that's lit with a couple of 60W bulbs, for example.  In this case, what happens at f/8 is that autofocus works with minimal hunting.  In most cases, f/8 AF sounds like "tick".  In f/11, every single time the camera goes from defocused to focused, you can hear the AF motor go "tick-tick-tock" as it moves past the in-focus point, and then back to best focus.

The live View Display Setting Effect is absolutely critical for flash photography anyways, because otherwise, you either have an overexposed image... or you have no idea what you're photographing :D   It's a good implementation, IMO.

IBIS seems to be best suited for lenses without built in lens stabilisation I've found - I think it defers to the in-built lens one when it is aware of it (at least, that's what it does on my adapted lenses). With the sigma arts, it seems to work a treat so far

Can't comment on the rest as haven't been using native glass as a rule, apart from agreeing about eye- af, and the crop mode (super useful with the sigma 35mm art in video, makes it a 35 and 50mm in one)

I see.  I did not know this, thanks!

I'd put weather sealing on the canon 'pro' side, but I having lost a 6d to weather, I'd be hesitant to use either in a rain storm without cover. Not sure if that is a factor for what you're doing.

My biggest problem with the weather sealing, to be honest, is that the battery compartment has zero weather sealing (it's quite obvious if you flip open the door).  I use a blackrapid, so my camera is almost always upside down, so you can imagine my concern...

I do not know what the weather sealing situation is with the grip (since the battery door isn't exposed).  However, I would worry that water would travel down the grip, to a crevice, and through the door.

Huh weird, I've found that slower moving objects seem to come up OK in my experience, so I wonder if it's more affected by certain shutter speeds? It's great for landscapes and timelapse, which is where most of my shooting is done. I guess the a9 is where they want you to be at for true silent shooting and action though

On the af point, I think part of the trouble is that it tries to focus with the lens stopped down, rather than opening the aperture up to get focus first, at least with one of the exposure simulations on: turning it off means that it will focus wide open and then stop down to the wanted aperture on shooting. Whether this is useful to you, or even the issue with focus and strobes,  I'm not sure. All I can remember is that it's one of the settings I leave on, as I don't typically use strobes/flash.

The weather sealing at the bottom seems to be the issue yeah; I'm normally on a tripod, so not such an issue there hopefully. Looking for a good cover (for both the sony and Canon) to minimise the risk overall. Can't really justify a 5dmk4 or 1dx2 just for the sake of a cover vs weather sealing

I've always wondered about the crevices on battery grips and sealing, interested to know if anyone has had any issues with Canon ones?

Talys

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #39 on: March 15, 2018, 12:46:23 AM »
Huh weird, I've found that slower moving objects seem to come up OK in my experience, so I wonder if it's more affected by certain shutter speeds? It's great for landscapes and timelapse, which is where most of my shooting is done. I guess the a9 is where they want you to be at for true silent shooting and action though

I have a sequence of 13 photos of a very large dog as it swims across a lake and then leaps into action.  It was taken with an A7R3  using center + expanding and shot at 8fps in Hi mode.  Shutter speed I think is 1/2500.

The photos while the dog is swimming towards me are relatively sharp, though not perfectly so.  At 1500 - 2000 long edge resolutions, I think they're clear enough.  However, as the dog moves into rapid action and splashes water around, the AF system gets confused, and sometimes focuses on the water droplets instead of the dog! 

Now, I know that I could have selected one of the "lock on the subject" modes, but I hate doing this, because it basically screws me over with quickly taking a picture of something else interesting that pops up.  Plus, being used to tracking subjects with center point AF, I'm quite comfortable with keeping camera pointed where the subject is.

Out of the 13 shots, 5 are pre-action and fine.  Of the remaining 8, only 3 are sharp enough to share; the rest are either just out of focus, or, the camera is focusing on the water droplets in the air.  Perhaps I'll post them up so that others can see.

On the af point, I think part of the trouble is that it tries to focus with the lens stopped down, rather than opening the aperture up to get focus first, at least with one of the exposure simulations on: turning it off means that it will focus wide open and then stop down to the wanted aperture on shooting. Whether this is useful to you, or even the issue with focus and strobes,  I'm not sure. All I can remember is that it's one of the settings I leave on, as I don't typically use strobes/flash.

I'm sure you mean Live View/Setting Effect On/Off.  It does not seem to improve things, but frankly, the camera is unusable with Effect On (WYSIWYG) when you're using flash, because if you're correctly exposed to see stuff, the flash will just wash everythign out.  If you have it configured for the flash, you won't see anything at all through the VF :D

Setting Effect to OFF, which make the VF always bright, does not appear to help.[/quote]

The weather sealing at the bottom seems to be the issue yeah; I'm normally on a tripod, so not such an issue there hopefully. Looking for a good cover (for both the sony and Canon) to minimise the risk overall. Can't really justify a 5dmk4 or 1dx2 just for the sake of a cover vs weather sealing

I've always wondered about the crevices on battery grips and sealing, interested to know if anyone has had any issues with Canon ones?

The crevices on the battery grips and base have no impact on a canon.  I think they exist to help grip the tripod plate to the base.

TBH, the weather sealing isn't a huge deal for me, because I don't shoot very often when it's raining, certainly not more than if it's a little drizzle.  But still, I'd much rather have a camera that's weather sealed than not.  Sometimes a little water or moisture is just unavoidable.

By the way, here's one of the sharper images of the dog.


Isaacheus

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #40 on: March 18, 2018, 05:47:08 AM »
Huh weird, I've found that slower moving objects seem to come up OK in my experience, so I wonder if it's more affected by certain shutter speeds? It's great for landscapes and timelapse, which is where most of my shooting is done. I guess the a9 is where they want you to be at for true silent shooting and action though

I have a sequence of 13 photos of a very large dog as it swims across a lake and then leaps into action.  It was taken with an A7R3  using center + expanding and shot at 8fps in Hi mode.  Shutter speed I think is 1/2500.

The photos while the dog is swimming towards me are relatively sharp, though not perfectly so.  At 1500 - 2000 long edge resolutions, I think they're clear enough.  However, as the dog moves into rapid action and splashes water around, the AF system gets confused, and sometimes focuses on the water droplets instead of the dog! 

Now, I know that I could have selected one of the "lock on the subject" modes, but I hate doing this, because it basically screws me over with quickly taking a picture of something else interesting that pops up.  Plus, being used to tracking subjects with center point AF, I'm quite comfortable with keeping camera pointed where the subject is.

Out of the 13 shots, 5 are pre-action and fine.  Of the remaining 8, only 3 are sharp enough to share; the rest are either just out of focus, or, the camera is focusing on the water droplets in the air.  Perhaps I'll post them up so that others can see.

On the af point, I think part of the trouble is that it tries to focus with the lens stopped down, rather than opening the aperture up to get focus first, at least with one of the exposure simulations on: turning it off means that it will focus wide open and then stop down to the wanted aperture on shooting. Whether this is useful to you, or even the issue with focus and strobes,  I'm not sure. All I can remember is that it's one of the settings I leave on, as I don't typically use strobes/flash.

I'm sure you mean Live View/Setting Effect On/Off.  It does not seem to improve things, but frankly, the camera is unusable with Effect On (WYSIWYG) when you're using flash, because if you're correctly exposed to see stuff, the flash will just wash everythign out.  If you have it configured for the flash, you won't see anything at all through the VF :D

Setting Effect to OFF, which make the VF always bright, does not appear to help.

The weather sealing at the bottom seems to be the issue yeah; I'm normally on a tripod, so not such an issue there hopefully. Looking for a good cover (for both the sony and Canon) to minimise the risk overall. Can't really justify a 5dmk4 or 1dx2 just for the sake of a cover vs weather sealing

I've always wondered about the crevices on battery grips and sealing, interested to know if anyone has had any issues with Canon ones?

The crevices on the battery grips and base have no impact on a canon.  I think they exist to help grip the tripod plate to the base.

TBH, the weather sealing isn't a huge deal for me, because I don't shoot very often when it's raining, certainly not more than if it's a little drizzle.  But still, I'd much rather have a camera that's weather sealed than not.  Sometimes a little water or moisture is just unavoidable.

By the way, here's one of the sharper images of the dog.
[/quote]

Nice shot of the dog.
Pity you've had a bit of trouble with the af though - I assume you've been using native glass if you're shooting at 8 fps too.

I haven't played around with the lock on af yet for the same reason you have.

And I think you're right about the view finder effect setting, I would have hoped that would help the situation but looks like it's an area where it could be improved.


Talys

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #41 on: March 18, 2018, 07:48:45 PM »
@isaacheus - yes, it was the native 100-400.

malarcky

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #42 on: April 06, 2018, 02:01:13 PM »
I always see people automatically go to the value scenario for some reason. I find that it distracts from the intent of the people who ask question about the gear. If someone wants to know if they would be happier with a different lens, most posters include the value aspect as the focus of their response. I think that the respondents should establish the ground rules for the implied intent of the OP before assuming that cost has to be a factor in this decision.

I bought a EF 100-400mm II because I wanted the best IQ I could get. I know that 400mm isn't offered in the EF-S line of lenses, but I was looking at images captured from this lens and knew I'd have to save for it because it is very expensive. I can't tell you how satisfied I am with the purchase, as I can see the reason this lens costs what it does. Every single time I review captures using this lens, there is a satisfaction that can't be bought. It's priceless. The same goes for the 70-200mm f/2.8 II. 

I am a hobby photographer that wants the best quality IQ I can get, and the satisfaction of reviewing the captures that just stand out as stunning is a priceless feeling. The feeling I get when I load up my gear, knowing that these lenses are top of the line, and realizing that I didn't try to save a couple hundred bucks for a lesser IQ result, makes it worthwhile each time. I may have spent a crazy amount of money as opposed to being more value conscious purchaser, but I am smiling ear to ear every time I pull the card out for reviewing the captures of the day.

The other thing that occured to me when I decided to drop that kind of cabbage on a lens was the resale value. I figure that I can sell these high quality lenses for a lot more than the less expensive ones. That is a comforting feeling as well.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #42 on: April 06, 2018, 02:01:13 PM »

Duct_Taper

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #43 on: May 08, 2018, 03:02:08 PM »
Update for anyone who was interested - I ended up picking up a used 80D (came with a 10-18 STM too).  It was too good a deal to pass up and I decided budget-wise I was going to be waiting a while to justify a FF body... especially when what I really want to spend that money on is lenses (100-400 II, I'm looking at you).

So far so good - DPAF truly is a whole different ball game from the live view experience on the T6s.  Well worth the price of admission.

I'm still getting my settings all dialed in but glad I went ahead with the upgrade!

stevelee

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Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #44 on: May 08, 2018, 04:42:52 PM »
Update for anyone who was interested - I ended up picking up a used 80D (came with a 10-18 STM too).  It was too good a deal to pass up and I decided budget-wise I was going to be waiting a while to justify a FF body... especially when what I really want to spend that money on is lenses (100-400 II, I'm looking at you).

So far so good - DPAF truly is a whole different ball game from the live view experience on the T6s.  Well worth the price of admission.

I'm still getting my settings all dialed in but glad I went ahead with the upgrade!

Congratulations. I came very close to buying an 80D to upgrade from my T3i. Everything I read and my limited experience with an 80D suggested that it is a great camera. I finally decided to wait for the 6D2 instead, and don't regret that. I just got the 100-400 II. I have now disposed of my disposable income, but am very happy with that purchase, too. I've read in more than one place that it is likely the best zoom telephoto ever. I would not be surprised if that is true.

I have the 10-22mm for my Rebel. I was shooting interiors for some realtors at the time, and it did a fine job. The 10-18mm came out later, and I likely would have bought it instead had it been out when I needed it. It is smaller and reviews say it is as sharp. And I had 18-22mm covered by the kit lens.

I still don't have anything wider than 24mm for my 6D2, so if I had a sudden need for UWA, I'd get out the Rebel and the T3i. If I had a little notice and I were going to make a little money off the shoot, I'd buy the 16-35mm f/4 for the 6D2. That covers the same range as the 10-22 does for Rebels.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Looking for upgrade recommendations from T6s
« Reply #44 on: May 08, 2018, 04:42:52 PM »