May 23, 2018, 01:13:44 PM

Author Topic: Bokeh with a 24-70  (Read 4892 times)

kat.hayes

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Re: Bokeh with a 24-70
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2018, 01:40:56 PM »
Do you get any lens distortion when shooting close to a subject with a 24-70 at any focal length?

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Re: Bokeh with a 24-70
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2018, 01:40:56 PM »

privatebydesign

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Re: Bokeh with a 24-70
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2018, 01:48:19 PM »
Any lens distortions are easily dealt with in post and are generally minor, what you can't deal with easily in post is projection distortion brought on by perspective.
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, DR, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

Talys

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Re: Bokeh with a 24-70
« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2018, 01:23:55 PM »
Do you get any lens distortion when shooting close to a subject with a 24-70 at any focal length?

Lens distortion, means if you take a straight on shot of a grid (like chicken wire or barred windows), whether those lines come out straight.  Pretty much every lens has a little, but like privatebydesign said, it's easily (and automatically) corrected in post.  It's tiny in EF24-70 and in the context of portraiture and most subjects, you'd never notice.

What you may be asking is about the "fisheye" effect.  The 24-70 is a rectilinear lens, meaning that at every focal length, straight lines will come out as straight lines, and there will be no intended barrel/pincushion effect.  This is as opposed to a curvilinear lens, which will give you that barreled look (and the 24-70 is definitely not that).

Even the 16-35 is not a curvilinear lens.  However, as you to wider angle focal lengths, perspective will appear more exagerated.  This means that objects closer will look larger and objects further will look smaller.  If you shoot something on an angle (for example, from the ground up or from an elevated position), this will exagerate a large enough subject.  For instance, if you shoot a person from above, with a wider focal length, they will look like they taper down.  This can be a desirable effect, for example, to present a more flattering perspective of who is heavy-set.  Conversely, a photo from the bottom up makes the head small and the lower body larger, which could give the right subject a super-hero pose.

And in a wide angle lens, if someone holds out their hand towards you at minimum focal distance, that hand will look much larger than if you did the same exercise from a more telephoto focal length.

But none of that is lens-dependent, as long as we're talking about rectilinear lenses.

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Re: Bokeh with a 24-70
« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2018, 01:23:55 PM »