June 20, 2018, 01:24:47 PM

Author Topic: Elinchrom announces the ELB 500 TTL: The world’s most powerful portable TTL flash system  (Read 7941 times)

hne

  • EOS 80D
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...and here are the flash curves and colour rendering indices of the ELB 500 TTL:
https://www.hansvaneijsden.com/elb-500-ttl-experience-new-elinchrom-flash/
Preferred gear: 5D IV, 35/1.4L, 85/1.4L IS, 70-200/2.8L IS, Elinchrom RX
Backup: 5D II, 17-40/4L, 85/1.8, 100-400/4.5-5.6L, Yongnuo + 622

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Viggo

  • Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II
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It’s as easy as demonstrated in the link on the previous page. Put a HS light and a HSS light on the same power and watch the HS shot be brighter, that means you get less light out of HSS than HS on the same power setting.

An example is with my B1 and a white BD I had to use full power and keep it really close when using HSS. My Bron lamp with the same type of BD I can use about power 5.0 instead of 10, also considering the Bron at 10.0 is 800Ws vs B1 at 500Ws.
1dx mkII, 35 L II, Zeiss 50 f2 mp, 85 L IS, Broncolor Siros 800 L.

Quackator

  • EOS M5
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Here's a full-power test between ELB 500 TTL and ELB 400 at 1/8000s: https://aifo.se/blogg/elinchrom-elb-500-ttl-test-bts/

Seems to me you get at least an extra stop using HS on the ELB 400 compared to HSS on the ELB 500 TTL.

Yeah, seems so, if you aren't aware of the gradual fall-off from bottom
brightest (and in this image subject closest) to top darkest.

A systematic procedure mistake.

Try that on a flat grey card and the world looks totally different.

This test is useless.

Viggo

  • Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II
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Here's a full-power test between ELB 500 TTL and ELB 400 at 1/8000s: https://aifo.se/blogg/elinchrom-elb-500-ttl-test-bts/

Seems to me you get at least an extra stop using HS on the ELB 400 compared to HSS on the ELB 500 TTL.

Yeah, seems so, if you aren't aware of the gradual fall-off from bottom
brightest (and in this image subject closest) to top darkest.

A systematic procedure mistake.

Try that on a flat grey card and the world looks totally different.

This test is useless.

Well, there will always a bit of gradation with HS, but tell me how often do you light and even background with HS where it could be an issue? I’ve used mine quite a bit, and normally shoot people, often in portrait mode and outside where ambient is the even light and my lamp is the key light. This will never be an issue for me, and the difference in power output is worth it.

Besides, at least my B1 also had gradation. It got much worse when Profoto decided to add HSS to the lower settings without it working like it did on the higher power setting.

So either method is compromise. And what is best for you can only you decide. For me HS is the winner.
1dx mkII, 35 L II, Zeiss 50 f2 mp, 85 L IS, Broncolor Siros 800 L.

Talys

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Here's a full-power test between ELB 500 TTL and ELB 400 at 1/8000s: https://aifo.se/blogg/elinchrom-elb-500-ttl-test-bts/

Seems to me you get at least an extra stop using HS on the ELB 400 compared to HSS on the ELB 500 TTL.

Yeah, seems so, if you aren't aware of the gradual fall-off from bottom
brightest (and in this image subject closest) to top darkest.

A systematic procedure mistake.

Try that on a flat grey card and the world looks totally different.

This test is useless.

Well, there will always a bit of gradation with HS, but tell me how often do you light and even background with HS where it could be an issue? I’ve used mine quite a bit, and normally shoot people, often in portrait mode and outside where ambient is the even light and my lamp is the key light. This will never be an issue for me, and the difference in power output is worth it.

Besides, at least my B1 also had gradation. It got much worse when Profoto decided to add HSS to the lower settings without it working like it did on the higher power setting.

So either method is compromise. And what is best for you can only you decide. For me HS is the winner.

With most portraits, the falloff is a plus, since you want the head area brightest, and unless you're showcasing the fashion, the rest of the person gradually darkening a bit is a plus.

I think that HS is a winner on paper, but I don't think that many people care in actual practice. 

The downside is, if you get used to shooting it, and you swap in lighting with speedlights, you're back to HSS, and your expectations may be a little different.

Quackator

  • EOS M5
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HSS works by extending flash duration and HS works by chopping it.

Not quite. Both try to make the flash emit light for as long as the shutter blades travel.

The light time needed is always one third stop longer than the max x-sync speed.

The shutter blades always travel at the same speed, no matter if you shoot at
30 seconds or 1/8000 seconds exposure time. The difference is the gap between
the two. At X-sync, the gap is exactly as wide as the frame.

One stop shorter, and the gap is only half as wide, so half the flash light
does not reach the sensor but instead is wasted on the shutter blades.

This counts for both HSS and Hypersync (and it's copies).

Select another stop shorter, and the shutter gap is halfed again,
and again the light is burnt on the shutter blades but does not
reach the sensor.  And so on. No matter if you use HSS or Hypersync,
both burn the majority of light onto the shutter blades. Period.

The Elinchrom marketing claim is badly misleading, to say the least.

When you turn on HSS you lose a stop, give or take.

The same counts for Hypersync. Simply activating either of the two means
that the flash starts emitting light before the shutter blades start, and still
lights a small time after the shutter has closed again.

This extra preroll and postroll time cannot be used for the exposure, for
both techniques.

On top of that every stop shorter in shutter speed halves the gap between
shutter blades compared to a longer stop and thus kills another stop.

Both HSS and Hypersync are workarounds that will die when global shutters
become available for flash sync as well.

HS (or SuperSync, HyperSync, ...)
(...)
The shorter shutter speed you use with HS, the smaller the part of the flash output curve you use.

No. You don't chop anything out. The flash fires free until the minimum discharge
voltage of the capacitor is reached and the plasma in the flash tube dies.

HSS and HS give exactly the same possibilities of stopping fast motion, since they
both make a flash behave like a continuous light source.

That is correct.

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