June 19, 2018, 10:13:31 PM

Author Topic: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro  (Read 5244 times)

keithcooper

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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2018, 04:34:34 AM »
It's expensive and for special purposes. I'd never have the use for one of them, and can't afford one anyway.

But far out, every time I see it, I desperately want to get one. It's gorgeous, and exploring tilt-shift at that focal length would be so much fun.

Well, there's this I made with a 5x4 camera from eBay and a few bits of scrap - far more movements than with the TS-E.  It's what I used to really understand movements

http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/canon-mpp-view-camera-adapter/


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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2018, 04:34:34 AM »

JoseB

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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2018, 09:24:20 AM »
Somewhere in time, I remember to read about a back someone created that allow a FF DSLR to slide and take for example a mosaic of 4 (or more) photos and later, in postprocessing, stitch it to make an huge resolution photo.
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keithcooper

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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2018, 09:34:38 AM »
Somewhere in time, I remember to read about a back someone created that allow a FF DSLR to slide and take for example a mosaic of 4 (or more) photos and later, in postprocessing, stitch it to make an huge resolution photo.
Yes, you can do that with the MPP adapter shown above

There are commercial versions of the plate I made that do this.  Given the simplicity of the device I made it shouldn't be too difficult.

This is one area where the depth of the mirror box of a DSLR limits the use of shorter FL lenses and tilt  - the MPP camera I used would be very useful with a mirrorless larger format camera.

There are also a whole range of much more expensive adapter options once you start looking...

ethanz

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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2018, 10:39:41 AM »
Hopefully GCHQ doesn't see you around with that thing. It looks suspicious!
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aceflibble

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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2018, 10:40:01 AM »
Stereo photography, or 3D ?
Nothing that fancy, just one for the studio kit and one in the travel kit.

Quite intentional I'm afraid...
I only had the lens for a relatively short period, and Karen won't let me publish any pics of her :-)

To be honest, it's also a lens I'd just never think of using for portraits, all that sharpness...  I'd much rather have the Canon 135/2 (if I did such work)  Any use of tilt just looks too gimmicky for my tastes, but YMMV, and if you got that much spare cash why not ;-)
Shame, but ah well.

As for use, it's for studio when that kind of sharpness is absolutely required; often archival fashion where the clothing itself needs to have every detail rendered with maximum clarity, as the files get viewed 1:1. Also of course, you can always smooth out sharpness, but you can't sharpen details which aren't captured in the first place. The 135mm f/2L is a lens I had to ditch several years ago because it wasn't holding up to clients' demands.
The tilt comes in useful for getting everything in as close to perfect focus as possible, regardless of the shooting angle requested—again, archival fashion demands this frequently—and shift has been useful a few times when I've been asked to shoot from a low angle, but clients didn't like the usual distorted perspective that gives; even just 1mm of shift is enough to correct that, with a person. It's also come in useful as a quick way to shoot multiple frames for stitching. That's all with the older 45mm and 90mm; I'm hoping the 135mm can take those uses further. (Ideally I'd have 105mm, but for some reason Canon seems allergic to the idea of making a new 100mm.) As it stands I still have to bust out large format on occasion, with a 150mm equivalent, and it'd be far easier to simply have another lens I could slap on the 5DS R.

YuengLinger

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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2018, 04:17:47 PM »
Shame there's no portrait examples, 'cause that's where this lens is most interesting. Had a play with the 90mm for portraits and product and it's definitely superb for the latter—I have ordered two for that purpose—but 90mm is just a little too short for a tight headshot. Been trying to get hold of the 135 to test, but it seems like they're snapped up the moment they land on these shores.

To be honest, it's also a lens I'd just never think of using for portraits, all that sharpness...  I'd much rather have the Canon 135/2 (if I did such work)  Any use of tilt just looks too gimmicky for my tastes, but YMMV, and if you got that much spare cash why not ;-)

Canon marketing, not seeing it as "gimmicky," says:

"The following thoughts connect both the TS-E 90mm f/2.8L Macro lens, and the stunning TS-E 135mm f/4L Macro lens.  The longer focal length of the latter is the primary distinction between them, although some may desire the faster f/2.8 maximum aperture of the 90mm lens.

Portraits
This may be the biggest potential application to consider for a tilt-shift lens. Aside from being superbly sharp 90mm and 135mm lenses, the ability to use shift to alter the plane of what’s in sharpest focus — either expanding the range of sharpness, or conversely using “reverse tilt” and narrowing it to a small sliver of the subject — gives these lenses visual control which simply cannot be duplicated by conventional portrait-length telephoto lenses. "

( http://learn.usa.canon.com/resources/articles/2017/tilt-shift-lenses-applications.shtml )

135mm does seem to be compositionally too tight to take advantage of the benefits and effects of tilt-shift, but having never used any tilt-shift, I'd really like to see a comparison to a slightly wider focal length for portraiture.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 04:20:57 PM by YuengLinger »

keithcooper

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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2018, 05:29:38 PM »
Shame there's no portrait examples, 'cause that's where this lens is most interesting. Had a play with the 90mm for portraits and product and it's definitely superb for the latter—I have ordered two for that purpose—but 90mm is just a little too short for a tight headshot. Been trying to get hold of the 135 to test, but it seems like they're snapped up the moment they land on these shores.

To be honest, it's also a lens I'd just never think of using for portraits, all that sharpness...  I'd much rather have the Canon 135/2 (if I did such work)  Any use of tilt just looks too gimmicky for my tastes, but YMMV, and if you got that much spare cash why not ;-)

Canon marketing, not seeing it as "gimmicky," says:

"The following thoughts connect both the TS-E 90mm f/2.8L Macro lens, and the stunning TS-E 135mm f/4L Macro lens.  The longer focal length of the latter is the primary distinction between them, although some may desire the faster f/2.8 maximum aperture of the 90mm lens.

Portraits
This may be the biggest potential application to consider for a tilt-shift lens. Aside from being superbly sharp 90mm and 135mm lenses, the ability to use shift to alter the plane of what’s in sharpest focus — either expanding the range of sharpness, or conversely using “reverse tilt” and narrowing it to a small sliver of the subject — gives these lenses visual control which simply cannot be duplicated by conventional portrait-length telephoto lenses. "

( http://learn.usa.canon.com/resources/articles/2017/tilt-shift-lenses-applications.shtml )

135mm does seem to be compositionally too tight to take advantage of the benefits and effects of tilt-shift, but having never used any tilt-shift, I'd really like to see a comparison to a slightly wider focal length for portraiture.

Yes, I can see a few uses that might not look too awful -  but I'm afraid people pics are unlikely to become part of my reviews ;-)

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Re: Northlight reviews the TS-E 135mm F4L Macro
« Reply #21 on: March 08, 2018, 05:29:38 PM »