June 24, 2018, 08:40:51 PM

Author Topic: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony  (Read 15907 times)

Talys

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #75 on: March 16, 2018, 10:10:17 AM »
Having a consistent UI is nice if you hand off the camera to someone else often.  Then you don't have to explain to people which button is for back-button focus, etc. and they don't have to go mucking around in the menus as much because the controls are as labeled. 

Sony should just assign the programmable buttons to the most used programmed setting (poll) and leave it as a default.

The Sony default button scheme is crazy, obscuring some of the best features and assigning unimportant features to a small number of custom buttons that are in the most accessible areas.  So yeah, I agree on reassigning the defaults for sure.

On the other hand, it's also a camera that is attractive to a pretty diverse group of people.  So, whether you want it to be a landscapes camera or a video rig or something for portraiture is gong to really change how it's configured.  An intelligent way for them to do it would be to have presets for landscapes, wildlife, video, portraiture, etc.

The other thing is, there are like, 50 menu options that you have to set  if you want your camera to work well.  Some of the default menu option choices are baffling to me.

Every time I've seen an A7/A9 demoed, a customer seems confused about something that works in an awkward way, and the salesperson tells them, well, they can reprogram that when they first configure the camera.


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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #75 on: March 16, 2018, 10:10:17 AM »

Calaverasgrande

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #76 on: June 12, 2018, 01:28:17 PM »
I'm not a huge brand loyalist. However I do really enjoy the Canon system. Having worked my way up from a T2i and kit lens to a 6D and a couple L lenses.
My sister who is a jewelry artist wants to get into doing her own product photography. Part of me really want's to recommend a Canon DSLR. For no other reason than I'd have an easier time showing her how to use it. And be better able to answer the inevitable frantic text messages if we both had similar cameras.
But there are all these nice Sony cameras, and the newer M4/3rd cameras from Fuji, Olympus etc are pretty damn capable. (though I'm still not buying the 50mp from a 16mp sensor using IBIS).
 
The Canon glass is for the most part still just as great. But the development of their cameras is lagging. Not just in the sensor and DR area. The way that the camera body is laid out harkens back to the 80's.
In fact, show a current DSLR to a millennial and they are likely to assume it's some grandpa's film camera.
The LCD display on the top, with it's weak illumination lamp hammers this home.
For Canon to expand it's base of users it needs to make a camera that isn't just more resolution. But more modern. The Sony A7 series just looks more like a thing that is made now (as does the new Hassleblad).

slclick

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #77 on: June 12, 2018, 02:00:42 PM »
I had my first opportunity to use a friends a6300 and found so many reasons why I love my Canons. First off was the lcd screen as I had to be in optimal light to see the image. The button/dial layout was awkward to me and the menu system was while not a Nikon like makes no sense, it easily could have been much simpler. Definitely not intuitive. The VF was brighter than my M5 and the focus points were great  but thats all I could see as a benefit.Not so big on the colors either, both indoors and out. I only used one low end lens and would like more time with adapted and better glass.
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Orangutan

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #78 on: June 12, 2018, 07:42:38 PM »
My sister who is a jewelry artist wants to get into doing her own product photography. Part of me really want's to recommend a Canon DSLR. For no other reason than I'd have an easier time showing her how to use it. And be better able to answer the inevitable frantic text messages if we both had similar cameras.
But there are all these nice Sony cameras, and the newer M4/3rd cameras from Fuji, Olympus etc are pretty damn capable. (though I'm still not buying the 50mp from a 16mp sensor using IBIS).

While I'm no expert, I do want to offer an observation as you consider what to recommend to your sister.  In the last few years, the main sensor differences are MP, high-ISO, and high-DR.  For jewelry shots, your sister will have 100% control of the environment: she'll shoot on-tripod under controlled lighting, so ISO and DR sensor improvements are worthless.  As others on the forum have written before, jewelry photography is more about skill than gear until you get to the point of using a TS lens.  My advice to you for your sister: buy a used/refurb body and lens, a basic/inexpensive set of continuous lighting, and a color card.  Then be prepared to spend many hours on the Internet reading-up on technique, and then more hours practicing.  As her skill develops she'll figure out what upgraded gear she needs.


Valvebounce

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #79 on: June 12, 2018, 08:06:22 PM »
Hi Orangutan.
I seem to recall product photography was discussed in great detail, with a very good argument being made on why to get a pro to do it for you (or at least someone who understands photography and lighting, like a brother!) if you want to actually sell the product, nothing hinders sales more than a poor photo!

Cheers, Graham.

My sister who is a jewelry artist wants to get into doing her own product photography. Part of me really want's to recommend a Canon DSLR. For no other reason than I'd have an easier time showing her how to use it. And be better able to answer the inevitable frantic text messages if we both had similar cameras.
But there are all these nice Sony cameras, and the newer M4/3rd cameras from Fuji, Olympus etc are pretty damn capable. (though I'm still not buying the 50mp from a 16mp sensor using IBIS).

While I'm no expert, I do want to offer an observation as you consider what to recommend to your sister.  In the last few years, the main sensor differences are MP, high-ISO, and high-DR.  For jewelry shots, your sister will have 100% control of the environment: she'll shoot on-tripod under controlled lighting, so ISO and DR sensor improvements are worthless.  As others on the forum have written before, jewelry photography is more about skill than gear until you get to the point of using a TS lens.  My advice to you for your sister: buy a used/refurb body and lens, a basic/inexpensive set of continuous lighting, and a color card.  Then be prepared to spend many hours on the Internet reading-up on technique, and then more hours practicing.  As her skill develops she'll figure out what upgraded gear she needs.
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Orangutan

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #80 on: June 12, 2018, 11:33:25 PM »
Hi Orangutan.
I seem to recall product photography was discussed in great detail, with a very good argument being made on why to get a pro to do it for you (or at least someone who understands photography and lighting, like a brother!) if you want to actually sell the product, nothing hinders sales more than a poor photo!

Cheers, Graham.

Yes, but "pros" have to start somewhere.  It may be foolish to rely on your own product photography without the skills, but if she's looking to build skills, she might as well practice on her own product.  I would hope that a working jewelry artist would be able to tell if her early photo work was crap.

Talys

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #81 on: June 13, 2018, 02:03:49 AM »
Hi Orangutan.
I seem to recall product photography was discussed in great detail, with a very good argument being made on why to get a pro to do it for you (or at least someone who understands photography and lighting, like a brother!) if you want to actually sell the product, nothing hinders sales more than a poor photo!

Cheers, Graham.

Yes, but "pros" have to start somewhere.  It may be foolish to rely on your own product photography without the skills, but if she's looking to build skills, she might as well practice on her own product.  I would hope that a working jewelry artist would be able to tell if her early photo work was crap.

I am absolutely with Orangutan. 

The key to "doing it yourself" is to not accept a photograph that isn't as good as what a professional charging you top dollar would produce.  To get there, all you need is some lighting, a roll of paper and time to learn -- and some good reading on lighting is helpful too.

If you have the will to generate good photographs, whether it's textiles or jewelry or automobiles, the subject isn't going anywhere, so given enough time, you can figure it out -- and then it will be a lot easier the next time.  Product photography also has the benefit to allowing those who are learning to (generally) use continuous lights instead of strobes/flashes for difficult shots -- and then move to strobes and fancier modifiers later on.  This is especially true of items like gemstones that reflect and refract light in all sorts of interesting ways.

The real argument against doing it yourself is that all the photography and lighting equipment, and in some cases, the space (if your subject is larger) is much more expensive than just having someone who does it for a living take care of it for you.  But then again, if it's your hobby, there is satisfaction to being able to produce it yourself!

And if all else fails, and you don't like your photos, you can hire someone to do it on location, observe what they do, and figure out what you did wrong :)

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #81 on: June 13, 2018, 02:03:49 AM »

Valvebounce

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #82 on: June 13, 2018, 09:12:51 AM »
Hi Folks.
Please don’t get me wrong, we all start out somewhere, my thought is that learning (and investing a sizeable chunk of cash in) a new skill might not be the best way to sell items for your main income?
I completely get the ‘I can do this’ attitude, there are a good many things around here that I have done with the ‘if they can do it so can I attitude.’
However, ‘I can build a gearbox and overdrive’ doesn’t seem to have given me much preparation for ‘I can skim and paint this bedroom wall!’ Apparently there are tricks of the trade I don’t know or the original (purple🤢) paint on the wall wouldn’t be blistering under the new emulsion paint!  ;D
Apparently not everything can be done by everybody, but my outlay is under £100 to discover I can’t do this well!

Cheers, Graham.

Hi Orangutan.
I seem to recall product photography was discussed in great detail, with a very good argument being made on why to get a pro to do it for you (or at least someone who understands photography and lighting, like a brother!) if you want to actually sell the product, nothing hinders sales more than a poor photo!

Cheers, Graham.

Yes, but "pros" have to start somewhere.  It may be foolish to rely on your own product photography without the skills, but if she's looking to build skills, she might as well practice on her own product.  I would hope that a working jewelry artist would be able to tell if her early photo work was crap.

I am absolutely with Orangutan. 

The key to "doing it yourself" is to not accept a photograph that isn't as good as what a professional charging you top dollar would produce.  To get there, all you need is some lighting, a roll of paper and time to learn -- and some good reading on lighting is helpful too.

If you have the will to generate good photographs, whether it's textiles or jewelry or automobiles, the subject isn't going anywhere, so given enough time, you can figure it out -- and then it will be a lot easier the next time.  Product photography also has the benefit to allowing those who are learning to (generally) use continuous lights instead of strobes/flashes for difficult shots -- and then move to strobes and fancier modifiers later on.  This is especially true of items like gemstones that reflect and refract light in all sorts of interesting ways.

The real argument against doing it yourself is that all the photography and lighting equipment, and in some cases, the space (if your subject is larger) is much more expensive than just having someone who does it for a living take care of it for you.  But then again, if it's your hobby, there is satisfaction to being able to produce it yourself!

And if all else fails, and you don't like your photos, you can hire someone to do it on location, observe what they do, and figure out what you did wrong :)
7DII+Grip, 1DsIII, 7D+Grip, 40D+Grip, EF 24-105 f4L EF-S 17-85, EF-S 10-22, EF 70-200 f2.8 L IS II, EF 1.4xIII, 2xIII, EF 100-400 f/4.5-5.6l IS II, Σ17-70 f2.8-4 C, EF 50mm f1.8, YN600EX-RT, YN-E3-RT, Filters, Remotes, Macro tubes, Tripods, heads etc!

1DsIII, 20D, 24-105, 17-85, Nifty 50 pre owned

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Re: Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony
« Reply #82 on: June 13, 2018, 09:12:51 AM »