May 27, 2018, 01:59:57 PM

Author Topic: Question for landscapers  (Read 3151 times)

timmy_650

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2018, 10:44:16 PM »
I really like the 24-105 for landscapes. But it matter what type of photos and time you have. I use to carry 17-35mm, 24-70mm f2.8, 70-200 f4 and sometimes 8-15mm. That was great but I was in good shape and unmarried. Now I am married and have a kid and not in as good shape. So Now I carry 24-105 and 17-35mm or a wide prime, on most of my adventures.  I have a hard time not recommending 24-105 bc of the price you can find it and the quaily you get out of it. 

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2018, 10:44:16 PM »

Mikehit

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2018, 03:50:57 AM »
Also bear in mind that perspective is a factor of distance from the object, not focal length. So if, the photos that jrvvn posted, you stood in position for the third photo and took the image using the 16-35 and the 70-200, then you could crop the 16-35 image to identical content of the 70-200 image. Of course, this all depends on how much you need to crop and how you intend to view the final image as to whether the image is good enough quality for you.

I didn't realise that the dark hedges was such a non-event other than as a photographic Mecca to take an image that you would not really see in real life.

Sporgon

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2018, 08:24:04 AM »
I didn't realise that the dark hedges was such a non-event other than as a photographic Mecca to take an image that you would not really see in real life.

Yes indeed, the images prove that the camera doesn't just bend the truth a little, it can completely distort reality, and makes a mockery of so much of the much debated 'ethics' of photography, where images are damned for being 'retouched' or altered after the capture, when focal length can alter the image just as much, as does altering the response curve. How often do we go a place and think "it's so small" compared with what you saw in a picture, or much less dramatic as in the Dark Hedges. Glen Affric in Scotland is another one where most of the iconic images are taken with a 200mm lens.

So surely the answer to the OP is get a 70-200, or a 70-300 etc. Can't see why people are suggesting a 24-70 given the context of the thread.

privatebydesign

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2018, 08:37:58 AM »
Yes once the specific requirement was pointed out with an illustration the 70-300 became the most obvious tool.

I have kept my laptop off limits while all this talk of 'compression' has been going on, at least I didn't have to be the one to point out, yet again, there is no such thing, it's just perspective, and then choose your framing.

Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, DR, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

Eclectik

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2018, 03:29:53 PM »
Yes, everything is a matter of perspective (the viewpoint you choose), but this is really cumbersome to simulate a 16-35 with a 70-200, and conversely... I find easier to use the 70-200 to shoot landscape. Photos are more "quiet", image is easier to compose (less disturbing elements). Pictures with UWA are often more striking, but a tele lens gives priority to background, rather than to foreground. Background does matter, in landscape.
A 70-200 is my easy second choice. Well, as always, a matter of taste...

ahsanford

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2018, 04:33:21 PM »
If you can always bring all your glass everywhere you go, get the 70-200 or even 70-300 (especially consider 70-300 if you are only shooting landscape narrow apertures).

The logic?  With two lenses you have 16 / 35 / 70 / 'long' well covered.  That's a pretty versatile spread for a landscaper.

However, if you can't always bring all your glass with you, a 24-70 / 24-105 is indispensable, IMHO.  I often can only take one lens, that's it, and it gets the job done.

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snoke

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2018, 07:00:06 PM »
Math has answer. Use size of red box. Find angle of view. Now you know mm for lens.

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2018, 07:00:06 PM »

Hector1970

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2018, 08:08:53 PM »
If you really want to compress the landscape I'd recommend a 800mm F5.6
An assistant to carry it would be helpful.
Enjoy whatever you buy. It will be a great lens.

Durf

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2018, 09:12:03 PM »
I have several lenses but often when I go on long hikes for serious landscape shooting I only take 2 lenses with me to keep my pack light, the:
Canon EF 16-35mm f/4L IS USM Lens
and the;
Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS II USM Lens.

These two lenses are actually both quite effective. I was hesitant about buying the 70-300mm over the 70-200mm, but glad I did, its quite light and a bit smaller compared to the 70-200 and is surprisingly sharp all through it's focal range. Some of the best landscape shots I ever got I captured with this cheaper 70-300 lens. This particular 70-300mm lens is an all around great lens for all types of photography.....and having the extra reach over the 70-200 is an added bonus.
....and of course, the 16-35 lens is in my opinion one of Canons best lenses they ever made for this wide angle range and sharpness, it's an awesome lens.

I've never really noticed the missing focal range of 36-69mm carrying just these two lenses only. One could always toss a cheap and tiny 50mm f/1.8 stm lens in their pack to fill the missing focal range void if they wanted but for me the missing gap is basically irrelevant.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2018, 09:25:43 PM by Durf »
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greger

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2018, 09:26:44 PM »
You didn’t say whether you shoot crop or full frame. When I bought my 40D it came with the 17-85 lens. My first lens purchase was the 50mm 1.8. I needed it when I went to Fort Langley, I needed the 1.8 aperature to shoot inside the buildings without flash. My next lens purchase was the 70-200 f4 IS USM I also purchased a 1.4 Extender at the same time. This was an excellent combination and I got many sharp shots of BIF. I blundered and bought a 2X Extender a couple of years later. I wasted my money. The pictures were too soft. Wanting the reach I bought the 100-400 vs 1 a few years before the vs 2 came out. I love my copy and am very happy. I like the push pull zoom feature and haven’t noticed any dust problem. Good luck in deciding which lens to purchase! As I now have 3 lens that have 67 mm Filter thread mount my next lens might be the 18-135 Nano to replace my aging 17-85 lens.
Canon 7D | EFS 17-85mm f/4-5.6 IS USM - EF 50mm f/1.8 Mark l - EF 100mm f/2.8 IS USM Macro - EF 70-200mm   f/4 L IS USM- EF 100-400    f4.5-5.6 IS USM - 1.4 ll and 2X ll Extenders

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Re: Question for landscapers
« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2018, 09:26:44 PM »