June 18, 2018, 03:41:57 AM

Author Topic: 5D Mk4, 6D Mk2, 7D Mk2, 80D and 5D Mk 3 compared for Wildlife photography  (Read 5062 times)

Talys

  • EOS-1D X Mark II
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  • Canon 6DII
Grant,

Thanks very much for the article!  I really enjoyed reading it. There is a minor typo in the ranking of DPAF for stills,  where you refer to the 5D Mark 6 :)

The detail you go into with respect to things like exposure and autofocus is great.

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jd7

  • EOS 7D Mark II
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  • Posts: 512
I'd like to add my thanks too Grant. I've only had time to skim read your article so far but I've already found some interesting things in it and I will read it properly as soon as I have a chance. I do like reading about your hands on experience with the various cameras and the way you set them up - plus there are some fantastic photos.

I noted your comments about the lack of an AF joystick on the 6DII and 80D. That alone was almost enough to make me to spring for a 5DIV (not that that is the 5DIV's only advantage of course), but I ended up going with the 6DII. One thing I've recently been trying is tapping the M.Fn button once and then you using the wheel near the shutter button and the rear dial to set the AF point - an idea I picked up from another CR member (thanks @tomscott!). It's a little annoying having to tap the M.Fn button first, but otherwise it is reasonably quick (although I need to develop the muscle memory for it yet) and I think it's a bit more comfortable than getting my thumb down to the eight way controller. Have you ever tried that AF point selection method?

Lastly, at the risk of going off topic, I noted a couple of photos in your post were taken with the 24-70 f/4L IS. Any reason you use it rather than a 24-70 f/2.8L II? I have the f/4L IS and I do think it's a good lens (especially for long hikes and other travel), and I have a couple of primes in that focal range for when I want faster apertures. Even so though, I get tempted by the 24-70 f/2.8L II from time to time. Just curious why you use the f/4 L IS, given the reputation of the 2.8L II. Given the other lenses you are carrying, it cannot be size/weight! :)
« Last Edit: May 20, 2018, 10:29:20 PM by jd7 »
6DII | 24-70 4L IS | 70-200 2.8L IS II | Sigma 35 1.4 Art | Sigma 50 1.4 Art | Sigma 85 1.4 EX | 1.4x mk II

Grant Atkinson

  • EOS M5
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  • Posts: 171
I'd like to add my thanks too Grant. I've only had time to skim read your article so far but I've already found some interesting things in it and I will read it properly as soon as I have a chance. I do like reading about your hands on experience with the various cameras and the way you set them up - plus there are some fantastic photos.

I noted your comments about the lack of an AF joystick on the 6DII and 80D. That alone was almost enough to make me to spring for a 5DIV (not that that is the 5DIV's only advantage of course), but I ended up going with the 6DII. One thing I've recently been trying is tapping the M.Fn button once and then you using the wheel near the shutter button and the rear dial to set the AF point - an idea I picked up from another CR member (thanks @tomscott!). It's a little annoying having to tap the M.Fn button first, but otherwise it is reasonably quick (although I need to develop the muscle memory for it yet) and I think it's a bit more comfortable than getting my thumb down to the eight way controller. Have you ever tried that AF point selection method?

Lastly, at the risk of going off topic, I noted a couple of photos in your post were taken with the 24-70 f/4L IS. Any reason you use it rather than a 24-70 f/2.8L II? I have the f/4L IS and I do think it's a good lens (especially for long hikes and other travel), and I have a couple of primes in that focal range for when I want faster apertures. Even so though, I get tempted by the 24-70 f/2.8L II from time to time. Just curious why you use the f/4 L IS, given the reputation of the 2.8L II. Given the other lenses you are carrying, it cannot be size/weight! :)
Hi JD, thanks for the feedback, always appreciated.   I do know about the dial turning method of moving the focus point around on the 6D Mark 2 and the 80D, and in fact you can do it on any Canon camera with two dials, but i find it very awkward to remember to use that method on one body then have a different method (on the 1DX, 5D4, 7D2 etc) when I pick up one of those bodies, specially when shooting them side by side which I do often :-).  Sometimes it can also happen that you don't press the M.Fn button far enough to activate it (by accident) and then I end up spinning the aperture the wrong way  :)
About the 24-70f4L IS, you nailed the reason that I carry it - although it is precisely because of the other lenses that i carry and how heavy they are, that i have to try cut weight somewhere - normally on any given trip i will take ONE big tele (400DO f4 IS ii OR 500f4 IS ii) and a mid range zoom (100-400 IS ii OR 70-200 f2.8 IS ii) and then just one wide angle.  I would like the extra sharpness of the f2.8 version of the 24-70 but I am happy enough with the results that i get from the f4 IS.  So for now it is doing the job.   :)
Cheers
Grant

Grant Atkinson

  • EOS M5
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  • Posts: 171
Grant,

Thanks very much for the article!  I really enjoyed reading it. There is a minor typo in the ranking of DPAF for stills,  where you refer to the 5D Mark 6 :)

The detail you go into with respect to things like exposure and autofocus is great.
Hey Talys
Thanks so much for the feedback, i really appreciate it. And thank for telling me about the typo with 5D Mark 6, don't we wish that was for real  :). Zim actually pointed that out to me with two other typos, and i spent ages trying to find the 5D Mark 6 one but couldnt - but not i can fix it.
Autofocus is one of the biggest performance features for us, so I do tend to go on a bit about it  :).  As are controls that can be activated with minimal chance of messing up other settings inadvertantly etc
I have also been enjoying your recent posts on the forum here with interesting detail about the Sony shooting experience.
Cheers
Grant

Grant Atkinson

  • EOS M5
  • ****
  • Posts: 171
I'd like to add my thanks too Grant. I've only had time to skim read your article so far but I've already found some interesting things in it and I will read it properly as soon as I have a chance. I do like reading about your hands on experience with the various cameras and the way you set them up - plus there are some fantastic photos.

I noted your comments about the lack of an AF joystick on the 6DII and 80D. That alone was almost enough to make me to spring for a 5DIV (not that that is the 5DIV's only advantage of course), but I ended up going with the 6DII. One thing I've recently been trying is tapping the M.Fn button once and then you using the wheel near the shutter button and the rear dial to set the AF point - an idea I picked up from another CR member (thanks @tomscott!). It's a little annoying having to tap the M.Fn button first, but otherwise it is reasonably quick (although I need to develop the muscle memory for it yet) and I think it's a bit more comfortable than getting my thumb down to the eight way controller. Have you ever tried that AF point selection method?

Lastly, at the risk of going off topic, I noted a couple of photos in your post were taken with the 24-70 f/4L IS. Any reason you use it rather than a 24-70 f/2.8L II? I have the f/4L IS and I do think it's a good lens (especially for long hikes and other travel), and I have a couple of primes in that focal range for when I want faster apertures. Even so though, I get tempted by the 24-70 f/2.8L II from time to time. Just curious why you use the f/4 L IS, given the reputation of the 2.8L II. Given the other lenses you are carrying, it cannot be size/weight! :)
You and Tom Scott bringing up the dial method of changing the focus point reminded me that was the only way to change the focus point position in the viewfinder grid on the EOS 1D Mark 2 and EOS 1D Mark 2 N, as they where not fitted with dedicated AF multi-controllers.  The rear command dial moved the AF point vertically and the front dial (beside the shutter) moved it horizontally if i recall properly.  The EOS 10D used the same method but the dedicated AF multi-controllers came out on the 1D Mark 3, and the 20D bodies and made it easier..I thought.  When using that system of changing the AF point with a command dial on those cameras with many focus points, i found it can save time to reduce the number of points in the viewfinder so that there are not so many to step across so long as you still have enough coverage  :)
Cheers
Grant

Ah-Keong

  • EOS Rebel T7i
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  • Posts: 118
Thanks for the great comparison review!~  :P
Canon 7D Mark II | Canon EF-S 10-18mm | Sigma DC 18-35mm ART | EF 70-200mm f/2,8L | 100mm Makro-Planar ZE
Canon Speedlite 430EX III-RT | 600EX-RT

Grant Atkinson

  • EOS M5
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Thanks for the great comparison review!~  :P
You are welcome Ah Keong :)

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tomscott

  • EOS 5DS R
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    • Tom Scott | Photography
As usual the 6DMKII is the dark horse in actual application from people that know what they are doing.

For £1175 it cant be beaten.

Great review  :)
5DIV 6DII 5DIII STOLEN 7DII 70D 17-55mm F2.8 16-35mm F2.8 II L 24-70mm F2.8 L 24-105mm F4 L 70-200mm F2.8 II L 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 II L 2x II 1.4X III 580EX

Grant Atkinson

  • EOS M5
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As usual the 6DMKII is the dark horse in actual application from people that know what they are doing.

For £1175 it cant be beaten.

Great review  :)
Thanks for the feedback Tom Scott, and yes, the 6D represents a very good value in that group of cameras  :)

Durf

  • EOS Rebel T7i
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    • Durf's Journal - Photography Art
As usual the 6DMKII is the dark horse in actual application from people that know what they are doing.

For £1175 it cant be beaten.

Great review  :)
Thanks for the feedback Tom Scott, and yes, the 6D represents a very good value in that group of cameras  :)

I serious think the 6D2 is the most under-rated camera of 2017. I've been shooting with it for 9+ months now with outstanding results and haven't had an issue with it yet. I occasional have to bracket some extreme landscape scenes for the dynamic range but I probably would have to anyways with just about any other camera.

I use my 80D mostly for wildlife (birds and moving objects with my long lenses) and actually used your 80D video Grant that you did about a year ago to adjust my settings for wildlife shooting with the 80D.....it works great!
6D2 | 80D | T6i | 16-35mm f/4L | 50mm f/1.8 STM | Tamron SP 45mm & 85mm f/1.8  | 100mm f2.8L Macro | 70-300mm IS USM ii | Sigma 150-600mm | 
Pentax K1000 | Vintage Glass: Takumar-Pentax-Helios |
www.DurfsJournal.com

tomscott

  • EOS 5DS R
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    • Tom Scott | Photography
As usual the 6DMKII is the dark horse in actual application from people that know what they are doing.

For £1175 it cant be beaten.

Great review  :)
Thanks for the feedback Tom Scott, and yes, the 6D represents a very good value in that group of cameras  :)

I serious think the 6D2 is the most under-rated camera of 2017. I've been shooting with it for 9+ months now with outstanding results and haven't had an issue with it yet. I occasional have to bracket some extreme landscape scenes for the dynamic range but I probably would have to anyways with just about any other camera.

I use my 80D mostly for wildlife (birds and moving objects with my long lenses) and actually used your 80D video Grant that you did about a year ago to adjust my settings for wildlife shooting with the 80D.....it works great!

+1 I was a very early adopter coming from the 5DMKIII and although its not perfect for all tasks it certainly is a very good performer.
5DIV 6DII 5DIII STOLEN 7DII 70D 17-55mm F2.8 16-35mm F2.8 II L 24-70mm F2.8 L 24-105mm F4 L 70-200mm F2.8 II L 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 II L 2x II 1.4X III 580EX

Durf

  • EOS Rebel T7i
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    • Durf's Journal - Photography Art
As usual the 6DMKII is the dark horse in actual application from people that know what they are doing.

For £1175 it cant be beaten.

Great review  :)
Thanks for the feedback Tom Scott, and yes, the 6D represents a very good value in that group of cameras  :)

I serious think the 6D2 is the most under-rated camera of 2017. I've been shooting with it for 9+ months now with outstanding results and haven't had an issue with it yet. I occasional have to bracket some extreme landscape scenes for the dynamic range but I probably would have to anyways with just about any other camera.

I use my 80D mostly for wildlife (birds and moving objects with my long lenses) and actually used your 80D video Grant that you did about a year ago to adjust my settings for wildlife shooting with the 80D.....it works great!

+1 I was a very early adopter coming from the 5DMKIII and although its not perfect for all tasks it certainly is a very good performer.

Yes, I agree it's not perfect but no camera is; I'm VERY satisfied with it though. Just like any tool one needs to learn how to use it and figure out its strengths and weaknesses to get the most out of it.....

I'm glad Grant included the 6D2 in this testing and comparison article, he shows it's potential as a worthy foe and perhaps not the best but quite capable of even casual to somewhat moderate FF wildlife photography ;)
6D2 | 80D | T6i | 16-35mm f/4L | 50mm f/1.8 STM | Tamron SP 45mm & 85mm f/1.8  | 100mm f2.8L Macro | 70-300mm IS USM ii | Sigma 150-600mm | 
Pentax K1000 | Vintage Glass: Takumar-Pentax-Helios |
www.DurfsJournal.com

Grant Atkinson

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Hi Durf
We also like shooting the 6D Mark 2 and the 80D together, they are so similar in their controls and feel, that it is seamless to switch between them.  We where really glad that the 6D Mark 2 came out when it did, in terms of this comparison it offers users more choices, and that is always good.  Also the 6D Mark 2 is plenty good enough for wildlife photography - the cameras image quality in low light is far superior to the wildlife cameras that we where using not that long ago - the 1D Mark 4, even the 5D Mark 3, and the 6D Mk2 autofocus is good enough.  Buffer is big enough, just..and frame rate is just fast enough, and once you take the price into consideration then it really stands up well in the comparison.
Also happy to hear that the autofocus video was helpful in setting up the 80D which is also a solid performer in its class  :)

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scottkinfw

  • EOS 5DS R
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  • Wildlife photography is my passion
    • www.kasden.smug.com
Just posted a side by side comparison of what it is like to use the 5D Mk4, the 6D Mk2, the 7D Mk2, the 80D and the 5D Mk 3 for wildlife photography: https://www.grantatkinson.com/blog/6d-mark-ii-5d-mark-iv-7d-mark-ii-or-80d-which-mid-range-canon-dslr-for-wildlife-photography
The aim of the post is not to declare an overall winner but rather to share what my wife and i perceive to be the different cameras strengths and weaknesses, for our kind of wildlife photography.  With that group of cameras, the 5D Mk4, 7D Mk2 and 5D Mk3 are all similar in their control layout, in their viewfinder autofocus, their dedicated AF multi-controllers, and their grip size.  The 6D Mark 2 and 80D are smaller in the hand, and have reduced size and controls, but make a strong case for themselves with their swivel-tilt screens and their image quality.

We get asked questions often by Canon users about these five cameras, so are hoping that the post provides some useful information.
Cheers
Grant

Hey Grant, thank you for all the work you put in to the articles!

I read both with particular interest in the 5DSR. 

So Grant, how much do you use the 5DSR when you shoot vs. The other bodies, and when do you prefer to use it?  I'm thinking that the 5DSR2 might be my next body.

By the way, how is the day to day in South Africa with that drought?

Thanks again.

Scott
Cameras: 1DXII,5D III, 5D II.  Lenses    24-70 2.8L II IS, 70-200 f4L IS, 70-200 f2.8L IS II, EF 400 5.6L, 300 2.8 IS II, Samyang 14 mm 2.8.   Flashes: 600EX-RT X 2, ST-E3-RT, 580 EX II.
Plus lots of stuff that just didn't work for me

Durf

  • EOS Rebel T7i
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    • Durf's Journal - Photography Art
Hi Durf
We also like shooting the 6D Mark 2 and the 80D together, they are so similar in their controls and feel, that it is seamless to switch between them.  We where really glad that the 6D Mark 2 came out when it did, in terms of this comparison it offers users more choices, and that is always good.  Also the 6D Mark 2 is plenty good enough for wildlife photography - the cameras image quality in low light is far superior to the wildlife cameras that we where using not that long ago - the 1D Mark 4, even the 5D Mark 3, and the 6D Mk2 autofocus is good enough.  Buffer is big enough, just..and frame rate is just fast enough, and once you take the price into consideration then it really stands up well in the comparison.
Also happy to hear that the autofocus video was helpful in setting up the 80D which is also a solid performer in its class  :)

Yes Grant, these two camera's pair up nicely, I really enjoy owning and using both these camera's together. For what I do they work out great for me and I have no desire to buy something else because the internet says I need a better camera! haha
....and if one broke I'd highly likely replace it with the same camera.
6D2 | 80D | T6i | 16-35mm f/4L | 50mm f/1.8 STM | Tamron SP 45mm & 85mm f/1.8  | 100mm f2.8L Macro | 70-300mm IS USM ii | Sigma 150-600mm | 
Pentax K1000 | Vintage Glass: Takumar-Pentax-Helios |
www.DurfsJournal.com

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