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Author Topic: new to portraits  (Read 2428 times)

mr.ranger

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new to portraits
« on: March 06, 2012, 10:50:30 PM »
Hi every I'm new to portrait photography. I am usually a wild life person. can you give me some critique on my shots. I'm using a 60D with 60mm Macro lens.  ;D
« Last Edit: March 07, 2012, 12:32:47 AM by mr.ranger »

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new to portraits
« on: March 06, 2012, 10:50:30 PM »

mr.ranger

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Re: new to portraits
« Reply #1 on: March 06, 2012, 10:53:17 PM »
some more

Kernuak

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Re: new to portraits
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2012, 06:04:58 PM »
Well, from one wildlife photographer to another...
They all look nice and sharp, but the lighting is a bit harsh. I think with some work playing around with the ideas may improve them. Also, unlike wildilfe post processing work is pretty key with portraits, with a lot of cleaning and heavier processing.
In the first one, I find my eyes being drawn to the bright areas behind, particularly because of the pointed shape that looks a bit like an ear. Sometimes it's good to go in close, but I think you're caught between too tight and not tight enough with this one. Try a few different crops to see what works and what doesn't. Cropping tighter will help to remove the distracting elements too.
I like the lighting on the second one, the slight rim lighting on the hair works well. However, I think at this angle, the hair over her left eye doesn't quite work for me. It certainly works for some shots, but I think it's more with moody looks, than head on with a radiant smile.
I think the third one is my favourite, but the harsh lighting doesn't help it. Her nose is too bright and I'd like to see her eye less in shadow. Try playing with the sliders in Photoshop or Lightroom if you shot in RAW, as I think you could reduce the contrast, then you may need to do some dodging and burning in the TIFF. Compositionally though, I like it, although you could perhaps crop out the little bit of her other eye.
The last one I think is an "almost" shot. Again, playing around with the highlights and shadows to reduce the contrast will help a lot. I think cropping the edge of her eyes though has lost the impact the shot could have had.
Hopefully my comments help until a real portrait photographer comes along.
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mr.ranger

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Re: new to portraits
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2012, 08:55:50 PM »
thanks that helps a lot. i have to go back and play with it. i did shot in raw did processing in lightroom.

tbadowski

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Re: new to portraits
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2012, 09:53:07 PM »
Also on the last one, I think it's a good example of where you want the focus point on the eyes- that would also soften some of the skin texture etc. on the bridge of the nose

Orion

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Re: new to portraits
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2012, 09:59:03 PM »
Not much to critique on, since you have showed not much due to the close range . . and that the last one has the eyes out of focus and the nose ridge in focus ;) ( go a bit wider because the composition is ditracting, in the way you cut the wedges of the eyes, etc. . . . )

ALso the harsh light can be fixed immediately if you find a shaded spot OR have the sun be BEHIND the person (free rim light) so that they are not squinting AND the formation of angular shadows don't fall on the face . . . . you also don't want a bright white shiny nose with the rest of the face done correctly. . .

In one of the images, I can see that the hair ws probably being moved by the wind . . well that is a nice sign do take a wider image and get that beautiful flow. ALso try and use 80-100mm for close portraits and see what you like best.

Lastly, try not to cut the chin so close to the lips (depending on the shot). Also, try not to crop at the neck. With outdoor portraiture, the main thing is ambient light/shade and composition. . . . keep an eye out for the sun and your background. You can use a long lens and get further away to sort of make the background come together more, and it will have adifferent, more plesing effect on the skin tones. . .

 . . forgot to mention: try off camera flash and wide aperatures to make your subject pop up from the background
« Last Edit: March 08, 2012, 10:03:03 PM by Orion »

kattamaran

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Re: new to portraits
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2012, 05:31:31 AM »
howdy

i like the composition of the first two alot. the second two don't seem to work for me. Number one problem for my self are working compositions. i struggle alot with them. i like the the second shot very very much especially composition wise.
the two at the bottom aside from a bad composition struggle with the harsh light, as statded befor.
keep it up :-) i think you do it alot better then me.

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Re: new to portraits
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2012, 05:31:31 AM »