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Author Topic: Your Mark III and settings.  (Read 1889 times)

idratherplaytennis

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Your Mark III and settings.
« on: March 29, 2012, 01:09:33 PM »
So, I have a question. I've recently purchased and acquired my 5D Mark III and have moved on up in a massive leap of camera scale, both in price and quality and technological advancements. That and I've read more posts than I care to about people beating both sides of the stick of "It's GREAT!" and "It SUCKS!" and would like to know from those who have actually taken the time of day to read the manual or already know what they're doing, to know what settings you personally have taken to clarify your images if you felt it was needed.

Now, please don't take this as an "I'm wanting to ask and not read the manual myself" excuse- I actually intend to do so while I'm on a trip in Vegas this weekend all of Friday, Saturday and sometime Sunday, to leave the camera at home, take the manual and in my off gambling time (when I've lost more than I care to :P which may be constant and frequent) read up on the whole thing. My other thing is, yes- I tried to do a search but never found something that relevant without tons of Mark III/D800 flame comparisons etc.. so I felt pretty justified trying to create a helpful thread. Those disclaimers said, something I've found of use is what follows:

I found that specifically, at least with my kit lens and the one or less hour of shooting I did (without checking on a computer, mind you, just zooming in on the LCD), I found that the central auto focus did better when I changed the AF mode from Single Point AF (Possibly the default? I don't remember what it was before messing with it) to Single Point Spot AF. This seemed to help net some sharper images from what I could tell zoomed in, but I still have a lot of other settings to alter to suit my preferences and a load of new things to learn. For instance I never knew I could (and apparently I could do this on my 20D..) focus with the AF button on the back and set up the shutter button to only fire the shutter. Need to read up on how to do this- mainly because it makes so much more sense to me.

My only hopes in this topic are to shed some light on what some of those hidden gems are that some might not know about, specifically the crowd who are jumping into the more professional series of bodies from the prosumer cropped bodies which were less customizable (if that makes sense??). Basically (to clarify): What settings did you immediately set after prior Mark II knowledge or reading the manual or other experince when you picked up your Mark III and began to shoot with it to test it out?

I also intend to come back and post anything else I find useful like the Spot AF later when I have a little more time to. Cheers to all the useful commenters  ;D and Boo to all the haters  >:( (but I still love you, hehe, cause they complete the yang to the yins and often make for some amusing to read topics)

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Your Mark III and settings.
« on: March 29, 2012, 01:09:33 PM »

facedodge

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Re: Your Mark III and settings.
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2012, 01:52:14 PM »
I wouldn't read the manual without having the camera nearby. Like reading a dictionary without being able to change settings and testing them out.

drjlo

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Re: Your Mark III and settings.
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2012, 02:36:51 PM »
I have left the "Drive" mode to silent one shot, where it will likely stay.  I did try various continuous shooting settings and am sad to report that SanDisk Ultra Class 10 SD card could not keep up with continuous high speed setting in RAW, basically freezing the camera for awhile (red light on) after about 6 bursts.  No problem when using reasonable JPEGS. 

Are people having much better luck with burst rate with CF cards?  Which one?  Thanks.

BTW, I really miss 2 things on the 5D III.
1.  No way to assign flash exposure compensation to programmable buttons.  Strange since Rebel bodies lets you do this. 

2.  I wish the view magnification button stayed on the right upper side.  I used to be able to adjust the lens with left hand, press magnification button with right hand for manual focus before pressing shutter.  Now I have to take my left hand off the lens focus ring to press the mag button on the lefts side.  Bummer!

Bosman

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Re: Your Mark III and settings.
« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2012, 06:17:38 PM »
I have left the "Drive" mode to silent one shot, where it will likely stay.  I did try various continuous shooting settings and am sad to report that SanDisk Ultra Class 10 SD card could not keep up with continuous high speed setting in RAW, basically freezing the camera for awhile (red light on) after about 6 bursts.  No problem when using reasonable JPEGS. 

Are people having much better luck with burst rate with CF cards?  Which one?  Thanks.

BTW, I really miss 2 things on the 5D III.
1.  No way to assign flash exposure compensation to programmable buttons.  Strange since Rebel bodies lets you do this. 

2.  I wish the view magnification button stayed on the right upper side.  I used to be able to adjust the lens with left hand, press magnification button with right hand for manual focus before pressing shutter.  Now I have to take my left hand off the lens focus ring to press the mag button on the lefts side.  Bummer!

Actually you can assign diff flash exposure amounts to each C1,C2, and C3. I have it at 0 on the C3, -2/3 on C2, -1/3 on C1.

The mag buttons you will get used to but it is much nicer to do one handed if you want. Some people are assingning their set button in the middle of the wheel to zoom.

Sd cards aren't at the same speeds as the Cf cards but the fastest out there is the Lexar 1000x CF. It is 150mb/s. The one you use is prob 30mb/s. I'd guess one that is 60mb/s or higher is preferred. The raw files are friggen huge. Think about it if the files are 24mg and you shoot burst sec you should only get about 7. Make sense? UDMA7 is the latest highest standard for CF cards and The 5dm3 supports the speed.
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wickidwombat

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Re: Your Mark III and settings.
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2012, 06:26:30 PM »
Are people having much better luck with burst rate with CF cards?  Which one?  Thanks.

BTW, I really miss 2 things on the 5D III.
1.  No way to assign flash exposure compensation to programmable buttons.  Strange since Rebel bodies lets you do this. 


I am using these SD cards
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/230748591036?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649

and these compact flash

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Transcend-Compact-Flash-CF-Memory-Card-32GB-400X-UDMA-/270744164272?pt=AU_Electronics_Memory_Cards&hash=item3f099c17b0

burst rate is fine with either no problems so far
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Drizzt321

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Re: Your Mark III and settings.
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2012, 08:56:40 PM »
Sd cards aren't at the same speeds as the Cf cards but the fastest out there is the Lexar 1000x CF. It is 150mb/s. The one you use is prob 30mb/s. I'd guess one that is 60mb/s or higher is preferred. The raw files are friggen huge. Think about it if the files are 24mg and you shoot burst sec you should only get about 7. Make sense? UDMA7 is the latest highest standard for CF cards and The 5dm3 supports the speed.

The problem with that Lexar card is it likely requires the UHS-1 (I think that's it) support, and the 5d3 doesn't support that for some reason. Only supports up to class 10, which I think will mean they will top out at 30-50 MB/s if I recall correctly.
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Re: Your Mark III and settings.
« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2012, 08:56:40 PM »