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Author Topic: 5D Mark III / 6D from India  (Read 29011 times)

bvukich

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2011, 09:54:36 PM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

The proximity sensor will probably disable the touchscreen when it is up to your face.  Much like phones do.  The screen already turns off when triggered by the proximity sensor.

That being said.  I want a touchscreen about as much as I want a swivel screen, which is not at all.

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #30 on: January 25, 2011, 09:54:36 PM »

Etienne

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #31 on: January 25, 2011, 11:11:02 PM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

Swivel screen and touch screen is fine with me. The 60D screen stays smudge free because I keep it turned in. Whenever I open it, it's clean and scratch free.


ronderick

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #32 on: January 26, 2011, 12:48:38 AM »
I would definitely want an articulating mirror.... which gives me the simple pleasure of simply reversing the LCD so there's no more wipe-your-nose-with-screen problem  ;D

As for touch screen, I won't mind if there's a way to disable this function w/o endangering any controls or comprimising weather/dust seal in any ways. Of course, adding a touch screen would no doubt raise the price tag of the camera...
Canon EOS 1D MKIV, EF 24-105mm F/4L, EF 70-200mm F/2.8L, TS-E 17mm F/4L, EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro
FujiFilm FinePix X100

DetlevCM

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #33 on: January 26, 2011, 01:07:38 AM »
There is one thing I'd find very bothersome with a touchscreen....

-> they tend to kill off buttons, and not everybody can use them well.

On my old laptop with a Synaptics touchpad I found that my index finger isn't good for a capacitive touch device - I can tap a touchpad without a response.... -> on a DSLR a touchscreen would only work as a gimmick, as nobody needs a potentially unresponsive interface with no feedback.

When you press a button you know you pressed it - when you tap the screen you - ehm, yes? You do NOT know whether the screen has registered it or not. And no, some shading, or colour overlay doesn't count, I don't need to look at a button to use it, on a screen I have to - unless it's covered by my finger.

My MP3 player let's me deduce one thing: Touch is nice for one function, and one function only - scrolling. On that note though, the scrollwheel on my 5D MK II is more responsive and more accurate than a touchscreen. Besides, considering the loading time per image, a touchscreen scroll wouldn't work unless the cameras mode of operation were redesigned.

And thanks for the correction above :)
Still makes the 5D iconic though - even if it wasn't the first digital FF.

Titanium

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #34 on: January 26, 2011, 02:01:36 AM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

The proximity sensor will probably disable the touchscreen when it is up to your face.  Much like phones do.  The screen already turns off when triggered by the proximity sensor.

That being said.  I want a touchscreen about as much as I want a swivel screen, which is not at all.

How do you compose your shots 1 inch above the surface of water? Or freezing mud? What above those overhead shots with arms fully stretched out? How do you deal with camera mounted on a fully extended monopod peeking through the side of the helicopter, on a speedboat, over the balcony from 60th floor of a tower or a moving car tracking another?
Truth is, unless you hook up an external LCD monitor, you can't do any of these shots without the flip-out screen.
But these are extreme examples. Personally, I find a fully articulate screen on my G11 a true blessing. I am sick and tired of squatting and standing like a spaz behind my camera mounted on a tripod because I'm 6'5". My neck starts hurting, my knees wanna pop-out. I compose ALL of my shots on a flip-out screen and it's a dream come true because I always look at the camera from the most comfortable position. I dictate its place, not the other way round. Last time I used a viewfinder was on my Minolta Dynax 9Xi in 1998. I learned photography in the early 90s and of course used a conventional viewfinder. Looking back - I really don't I miss it. It's a remnant of another era. You can't see the image as sensor sees it. No DOF preview without dimming. No colour balance preview. No this, not that. Sorry, I can't accept that in 2011.
Today, I use the viewfinder only if LCD gets too dim in a direct daylight...which almost never happens.
This is how I see it: people feared cars when horses were the only means of transportation. No one appreciated photography 120 years ago because it wasn't considered a true art. Nobody wanted sound in the era of silent films and LCD screens were unheard of in 35mm film cameras. Get used to a good thing mate, it's here to serve you and make your life easy. Good ahead and flame me now.

MCK

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #35 on: January 26, 2011, 03:31:25 AM »
thats a good one  ;D

DetlevCM

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #36 on: January 26, 2011, 03:39:28 AM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

The proximity sensor will probably disable the touchscreen when it is up to your face.  Much like phones do.  The screen already turns off when triggered by the proximity sensor.

That being said.  I want a touchscreen about as much as I want a swivel screen, which is not at all.

How do you compose your shots 1 inch above the surface of water? Or freezing mud? What above those overhead shots with arms fully stretched out? How do you deal with camera mounted on a fully extended monopod peeking through the side of the helicopter, on a speedboat, over the balcony from 60th floor of a tower or a moving car tracking another?
Truth is, unless you hook up an external LCD monitor, you can't do any of these shots without the flip-out screen.
But these are extreme examples. Personally, I find a fully articulate screen on my G11 a true blessing. I am sick and tired of squatting and standing like a spaz behind my camera mounted on a tripod because I'm 6'5". My neck starts hurting, my knees wanna pop-out. I compose ALL of my shots on a flip-out screen and it's a dream come true because I always look at the camera from the most comfortable position. I dictate its place, not the other way round. Last time I used a viewfinder was on my Minolta Dynax 9Xi in 1998. I learned photography in the early 90s and of course used a conventional viewfinder. Looking back - I really don't I miss it. It's a remnant of another era. You can't see the image as sensor sees it. No DOF preview without dimming. No colour balance preview. No this, not that. Sorry, I can't accept that in 2011.
Today, I use the viewfinder only if LCD gets too dim in a direct daylight...which almost never happens.
This is how I see it: people feared cars when horses were the only means of transportation. No one appreciated photography 120 years ago because it wasn't considered a true art. Nobody wanted sound in the era of silent films and LCD screens were unheard of in 35mm film cameras. Get used to a good thing mate, it's here to serve you and make your life easy. Good ahead and flame me now.

Actually, you can - you should know your camera good enough to estimate the filed of view.
With today's megapixel count you can easily frame a bit wider to allow you to level the image.

And it's not that difficult to do at all.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #36 on: January 26, 2011, 03:39:28 AM »

Titanium

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #37 on: January 26, 2011, 05:08:19 AM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

The proximity sensor will probably disable the touchscreen when it is up to your face.  Much like phones do.  The screen already turns off when triggered by the proximity sensor.

That being said.  I want a touchscreen about as much as I want a swivel screen, which is not at all.

How do you compose your shots 1 inch above the surface of water? Or freezing mud? What above those overhead shots with arms fully stretched out? How do you deal with camera mounted on a fully extended monopod peeking through the side of the helicopter, on a speedboat, over the balcony from 60th floor of a tower or a moving car tracking another?
Truth is, unless you hook up an external LCD monitor, you can't do any of these shots without the flip-out screen.
But these are extreme examples. Personally, I find a fully articulate screen on my G11 a true blessing. I am sick and tired of squatting and standing like a spaz behind my camera mounted on a tripod because I'm 6'5". My neck starts hurting, my knees wanna pop-out. I compose ALL of my shots on a flip-out screen and it's a dream come true because I always look at the camera from the most comfortable position. I dictate its place, not the other way round. Last time I used a viewfinder was on my Minolta Dynax 9Xi in 1998. I learned photography in the early 90s and of course used a conventional viewfinder. Looking back - I really don't I miss it. It's a remnant of another era. You can't see the image as sensor sees it. No DOF preview without dimming. No colour balance preview. No this, not that. Sorry, I can't accept that in 2011.
Today, I use the viewfinder only if LCD gets too dim in a direct daylight...which almost never happens.
This is how I see it: people feared cars when horses were the only means of transportation. No one appreciated photography 120 years ago because it wasn't considered a true art. Nobody wanted sound in the era of silent films and LCD screens were unheard of in 35mm film cameras. Get used to a good thing mate, it's here to serve you and make your life easy. Good ahead and flame me now.

Actually, you can - you should know your camera good enough to estimate the filed of view.
With today's megapixel count you can easily frame a bit wider to allow you to level the image.

And it's not that difficult to do at all.

I'm sure you can but why would you when there's technology that takes guesstimation out of the equation? I'll choose to control my composition versus shooting in the dark any day.

DetlevCM

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #38 on: January 26, 2011, 05:14:20 AM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

The proximity sensor will probably disable the touchscreen when it is up to your face.  Much like phones do.  The screen already turns off when triggered by the proximity sensor.

That being said.  I want a touchscreen about as much as I want a swivel screen, which is not at all.

How do you compose your shots 1 inch above the surface of water? Or freezing mud? What above those overhead shots with arms fully stretched out? How do you deal with camera mounted on a fully extended monopod peeking through the side of the helicopter, on a speedboat, over the balcony from 60th floor of a tower or a moving car tracking another?
Truth is, unless you hook up an external LCD monitor, you can't do any of these shots without the flip-out screen.
But these are extreme examples. Personally, I find a fully articulate screen on my G11 a true blessing. I am sick and tired of squatting and standing like a spaz behind my camera mounted on a tripod because I'm 6'5". My neck starts hurting, my knees wanna pop-out. I compose ALL of my shots on a flip-out screen and it's a dream come true because I always look at the camera from the most comfortable position. I dictate its place, not the other way round. Last time I used a viewfinder was on my Minolta Dynax 9Xi in 1998. I learned photography in the early 90s and of course used a conventional viewfinder. Looking back - I really don't I miss it. It's a remnant of another era. You can't see the image as sensor sees it. No DOF preview without dimming. No colour balance preview. No this, not that. Sorry, I can't accept that in 2011.
Today, I use the viewfinder only if LCD gets too dim in a direct daylight...which almost never happens.
This is how I see it: people feared cars when horses were the only means of transportation. No one appreciated photography 120 years ago because it wasn't considered a true art. Nobody wanted sound in the era of silent films and LCD screens were unheard of in 35mm film cameras. Get used to a good thing mate, it's here to serve you and make your life easy. Good ahead and flame me now.

Actually, you can - you should know your camera good enough to estimate the filed of view.
With today's megapixel count you can easily frame a bit wider to allow you to level the image.

And it's not that difficult to do at all.

I'm sure you can but why would you when there's technology that takes guesstimation out of the equation? I'll choose to control my composition versus shooting in the dark any day.

Maybe because I still like to think that there is still some art to photography - which makes some people better at it, an some worse.

It's the same reason I don't really like Photoshop, but at the same time appreciate its features.
The most editing I feel that should be done is CameraRAW (which offers the same options as film).

Titanium

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #39 on: January 26, 2011, 05:36:15 AM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

The proximity sensor will probably disable the touchscreen when it is up to your face.  Much like phones do.  The screen already turns off when triggered by the proximity sensor.

That being said.  I want a touchscreen about as much as I want a swivel screen, which is not at all.

How do you compose your shots 1 inch above the surface of water? Or freezing mud? What above those overhead shots with arms fully stretched out? How do you deal with camera mounted on a fully extended monopod peeking through the side of the helicopter, on a speedboat, over the balcony from 60th floor of a tower or a moving car tracking another?
Truth is, unless you hook up an external LCD monitor, you can't do any of these shots without the flip-out screen.
But these are extreme examples. Personally, I find a fully articulate screen on my G11 a true blessing. I am sick and tired of squatting and standing like a spaz behind my camera mounted on a tripod because I'm 6'5". My neck starts hurting, my knees wanna pop-out. I compose ALL of my shots on a flip-out screen and it's a dream come true because I always look at the camera from the most comfortable position. I dictate its place, not the other way round. Last time I used a viewfinder was on my Minolta Dynax 9Xi in 1998. I learned photography in the early 90s and of course used a conventional viewfinder. Looking back - I really don't I miss it. It's a remnant of another era. You can't see the image as sensor sees it. No DOF preview without dimming. No colour balance preview. No this, not that. Sorry, I can't accept that in 2011.
Today, I use the viewfinder only if LCD gets too dim in a direct daylight...which almost never happens.
This is how I see it: people feared cars when horses were the only means of transportation. No one appreciated photography 120 years ago because it wasn't considered a true art. Nobody wanted sound in the era of silent films and LCD screens were unheard of in 35mm film cameras. Get used to a good thing mate, it's here to serve you and make your life easy. Good ahead and flame me now.

Actually, you can - you should know your camera good enough to estimate the filed of view.
With today's megapixel count you can easily frame a bit wider to allow you to level the image.

And it's not that difficult to do at all.

I'm sure you can but why would you when there's technology that takes guesstimation out of the equation? I'll choose to control my composition versus shooting in the dark any day.

Maybe because I still like to think that there is still some art to photography - which makes some people better at it, an some worse.

It's the same reason I don't really like Photoshop, but at the same time appreciate its features.
The most editing I feel that should be done is CameraRAW (which offers the same options as film).

I see. So by this logic, those who use camera's viewfinder are true photographers and artists and those who compose their shots with LCD screen...are not? Fascinating. Old 8X10 view camera used by Ansel Adams in the previous century didn't have the viewfinder either. Entire back of the camera was an 8x10 screen and picture was reversed. This is how he composed his legendary shots. He must've been a hack too I guess.

As for your comment regarding Photoshop - I think you're completely off the mark.
Greatest photographers in history spent HOURS and sometimes DAYS in the darkroom printing that perfect print from one single negative. Ansel Adams, America's greatest landscape photographer ever, wrote volumes of books on how to selectively adjust the lighting during the printing process in order to bring out the detail in the shadows and in the highlights. See Amazon.com for his incredibly literature.
He used dodging and burning (same tools exist in Photoshop today) to control the exposure levels across the print. He developed an ingenious lighting matrix (a grid of bulbs) with ability to control the intensity of light coming from each bulb during the printing of enlargements and that's how the bright skies in his prints always retained the detail, likewise, in the shadows. Isn't that a precusor or today's HDR? He was always removing intruding elements that peeked inside his composition such as branches of trees branches by carefully rotating negatives and cropping the outer edges of his exposed frames. He died in 1982, way before the advent of digital photography and computer image processing. What do you think he would've thought of today's tools?
He experimented with various chemicals, development times, types of print media, all in order to enhance colours, mood, vibrance or tonal ranges, etc - that's a today's equivalent of brightness/contrast/levels/curves/colour balance in Photoshop. In fact, most of the image adjustment tools in Photoshop today are inspired directly by the chemical/optical processes in the darkroom. Legacy of great masters.
Do yourself a favour. Learn how to use Photoshop -seriously-, don't just appreciate its features and frown upon it. Put it to good use and your photography will benefit from it greatly.

Titanium

  • Guest
Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #40 on: January 26, 2011, 05:41:50 AM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

The proximity sensor will probably disable the touchscreen when it is up to your face.  Much like phones do.  The screen already turns off when triggered by the proximity sensor.

That being said.  I want a touchscreen about as much as I want a swivel screen, which is not at all.

How do you compose your shots 1 inch above the surface of water? Or freezing mud? What above those overhead shots with arms fully stretched out? How do you deal with camera mounted on a fully extended monopod peeking through the side of the helicopter, on a speedboat, over the balcony from 60th floor of a tower or a moving car tracking another?
Truth is, unless you hook up an external LCD monitor, you can't do any of these shots without the flip-out screen.
But these are extreme examples. Personally, I find a fully articulate screen on my G11 a true blessing. I am sick and tired of squatting and standing like a spaz behind my camera mounted on a tripod because I'm 6'5". My neck starts hurting, my knees wanna pop-out. I compose ALL of my shots on a flip-out screen and it's a dream come true because I always look at the camera from the most comfortable position. I dictate its place, not the other way round. Last time I used a viewfinder was on my Minolta Dynax 9Xi in 1998. I learned photography in the early 90s and of course used a conventional viewfinder. Looking back - I really don't I miss it. It's a remnant of another era. You can't see the image as sensor sees it. No DOF preview without dimming. No colour balance preview. No this, not that. Sorry, I can't accept that in 2011.
Today, I use the viewfinder only if LCD gets too dim in a direct daylight...which almost never happens.
This is how I see it: people feared cars when horses were the only means of transportation. No one appreciated photography 120 years ago because it wasn't considered a true art. Nobody wanted sound in the era of silent films and LCD screens were unheard of in 35mm film cameras. Get used to a good thing mate, it's here to serve you and make your life easy. Good ahead and flame me now.

Actually, you can - you should know your camera good enough to estimate the filed of view.
With today's megapixel count you can easily frame a bit wider to allow you to level the image.

And it's not that difficult to do at all.

I'm sure you can but why would you when there's technology that takes guesstimation out of the equation? I'll choose to control my composition versus shooting in the dark any day.

Maybe because I still like to think that there is still some art to photography - which makes some people better at it, an some worse.

It's the same reason I don't really like Photoshop, but at the same time appreciate its features.
The most editing I feel that should be done is CameraRAW (which offers the same options as film).

I see. So by this logic, those who use camera's viewfinder are true photographers and artists and those who compose their shots with LCD screen...are not? Fascinating. Old 8X10 view camera used by Ansel Adams in the previous century didn't have the viewfinder either. Entire back of the camera was an 8x10 screen and picture was reversed. This is how he composed his legendary shots. He must've been a hack too I guess.

As for your comment regarding Photoshop - I think you're completely off the mark.
Greatest photographers in history spent HOURS and sometimes DAYS in the darkroom printing that perfect print from one single negative. Ansel Adams, America's greatest landscape photographer ever, wrote volumes of books on how to selectively adjust the lighting during the printing process in order to bring out the detail in the shadows and in the highlights. See Amazon.com for his incredibly literature.
He used dodging and burning (same tools exist in Photoshop today) to control the exposure levels across the print. He developed an ingenious lighting matrix (a grid of bulbs) with ability to control the intensity of light coming from each bulb during the printing of enlargements and that's how the bright skies in his prints always retained the detail, likewise, in the shadows. Isn't that a precusor or today's HDR? He was always removing intruding elements that peeked inside his composition such as branches of trees branches by carefully rotating negatives and cropping the outer edges of his exposed frames. He died in 1982, way before the advent of digital photography and computer image processing. What do you think he would've thought of today's tools?
He experimented with various chemicals, development times, types of print media, all in order to enhance colours, mood, vibrance or tonal ranges, etc - that's a today's equivalent of brightness/contrast/levels/curves/colour balance in Photoshop. In fact, most of the image adjustment tools in Photoshop today are inspired directly by the chemical/optical processes in the darkroom. Legacy of great masters.
Do yourself a favour. Learn how to use Photoshop -seriously-, don't just appreciate its features and frown upon it. Put it to good use and your photography will benefit from it greatly.

Here are some of Ansel's famous quotes that I find very relevant in this debate:

"Dodging and burning are steps to take care of mistakes God made in establishing tonal relationships."

"The negative is comparable to the composer's score and the print to its performance. Each performance differs in subtle ways."  Ansel Adams


No difference today - take a RAW image with you digital camera. That's your score. Bring it into Photoshop and express your vision fully. That's your performance.


DetlevCM

  • Guest
Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #41 on: January 26, 2011, 05:47:40 AM »
Quote
The last thing I need is a touch screen.

I won't entirely dismiss a touch screen, but I do wonder how that would work. As it is, every time I look through the viewfinder I end up with smudges on the screen. I wonder how they'd prevent me from changing settings with my nose.  :)

Keep in mind too, that with phone touch screens, you have to have special gloves for the winter. Never say never, but I just have a hard time getting my head around the idea that this would be a good thing.

The proximity sensor will probably disable the touchscreen when it is up to your face.  Much like phones do.  The screen already turns off when triggered by the proximity sensor.

That being said.  I want a touchscreen about as much as I want a swivel screen, which is not at all.

How do you compose your shots 1 inch above the surface of water? Or freezing mud? What above those overhead shots with arms fully stretched out? How do you deal with camera mounted on a fully extended monopod peeking through the side of the helicopter, on a speedboat, over the balcony from 60th floor of a tower or a moving car tracking another?
Truth is, unless you hook up an external LCD monitor, you can't do any of these shots without the flip-out screen.
But these are extreme examples. Personally, I find a fully articulate screen on my G11 a true blessing. I am sick and tired of squatting and standing like a spaz behind my camera mounted on a tripod because I'm 6'5". My neck starts hurting, my knees wanna pop-out. I compose ALL of my shots on a flip-out screen and it's a dream come true because I always look at the camera from the most comfortable position. I dictate its place, not the other way round. Last time I used a viewfinder was on my Minolta Dynax 9Xi in 1998. I learned photography in the early 90s and of course used a conventional viewfinder. Looking back - I really don't I miss it. It's a remnant of another era. You can't see the image as sensor sees it. No DOF preview without dimming. No colour balance preview. No this, not that. Sorry, I can't accept that in 2011.
Today, I use the viewfinder only if LCD gets too dim in a direct daylight...which almost never happens.
This is how I see it: people feared cars when horses were the only means of transportation. No one appreciated photography 120 years ago because it wasn't considered a true art. Nobody wanted sound in the era of silent films and LCD screens were unheard of in 35mm film cameras. Get used to a good thing mate, it's here to serve you and make your life easy. Good ahead and flame me now.

Actually, you can - you should know your camera good enough to estimate the filed of view.
With today's megapixel count you can easily frame a bit wider to allow you to level the image.

And it's not that difficult to do at all.

I'm sure you can but why would you when there's technology that takes guesstimation out of the equation? I'll choose to control my composition versus shooting in the dark any day.

Maybe because I still like to think that there is still some art to photography - which makes some people better at it, an some worse.

It's the same reason I don't really like Photoshop, but at the same time appreciate its features.
The most editing I feel that should be done is CameraRAW (which offers the same options as film).

I see. So by this logic, those who use camera's viewfinder are true photographers and artists and those who compose their shots with LCD screen...are not? Fascinating. Old 8X10 view camera used by Ansel Adams in the previous century didn't have the viewfinder either. Entire back of the camera was an 8x10 screen and picture was reversed. This is how he composed his legendary shots. He must've been a hack too I guess.

As for your comment regarding Photoshop - I think you're completely off the mark.
Greatest photographers in history spent HOURS and sometimes DAYS in the darkroom printing that perfect print from one single negative. Ansel Adams, America's greatest landscape photographer ever, wrote volumes of books on how to selectively adjust the lighting during the printing process in order to bring out the detail in the shadows and in the highlights. See Amazon.com for his incredibly literature.
He used dodging and burning (same tools exist in Photoshop today) to control the exposure levels across the print. He developed an ingenious lighting matrix (a grid of bulbs) with ability to control the intensity of light coming from each bulb during the printing of enlargements and that's how the bright skies in his prints always retained the detail, likewise, in the shadows. Isn't that a precusor or today's HDR? He was always removing intruding elements that peeked inside his composition such as branches of trees branches by carefully rotating negatives and cropping the outer edges of his exposed frames. He died in 1982, way before the advent of digital photography and computer image processing. What do you think he would've thought of today's tools?
He experimented with various chemicals, development times, types of print media, all in order to enhance colours, mood, vibrance or tonal ranges, etc - that's a today's equivalent of brightness/contrast/levels/curves/colour balance in Photoshop. In fact, most of the image adjustment tools in Photoshop today are inspired directly by the chemical/optical processes in the darkroom. Legacy of great masters.
Do yourself a favour. Learn how to use Photoshop -seriously-, don't just appreciate its features and frown upon it. Put it to good use and your photography will benefit from it greatly.

That's why I said I believe the most one should edit is CameraRAW. No editing is impossible - but all that Photoshop "stuff". -> if I want a fake image I'll ask for a computer simulation.

And Photoshop - I don't have the patience to spend ages on an image - in CameraRAW I'm normally done with it in less than 1 minute. Yes, I do end up shooting the odd HDR - and that's a deviation from my "normal course" but not that many, and then I try to make them look as normal as possible.
Oh, and I don't have the time to spend on figuring out all the depths of Photoshop.

I still call an image that has taken a lot of editing, especially in Photoshop a fake image.

Canon 14-24

  • Guest
Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #42 on: January 26, 2011, 06:34:11 AM »
Likewise, I can still call an image that's been processed through photoshop or rendered in HDR to be photography.

I believe we've all heard this argument so many times, and honestly to each their own, it comes down to if you like what you do that is what matters.  Of the countless debates and discussions I've read on the issue these are some quotes I've pulled out from the discussions that put into context my overall opinion of it:

"I do expect that most people call Ansel Adams a photographer, even though his end product HAS been edited. Mathematically stitched panoramic images are also photographs; they just exceed the limitations of a particular lens."

There is a saying Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, what is cartoonish, over worked blurred chaff to one person maybe another's idea of perfection.

Keep doing what you like how you like it and wave a proverbial two fingered salute to the whinging wining crew that conform to their own warped sense of right and wrong.


Nope, do as you please. Vote on contests as you please. But don't expect others to follow your very narrow definition of photography. We're not all held to the limits of ethical photojournalism. Art holds a mirror to reality. Art is not reality.

Photography.... There is no right or wrong.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2011, 06:43:57 AM by Canon 14-24 »

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #42 on: January 26, 2011, 06:34:11 AM »

Titanium

  • Guest
Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #43 on: January 26, 2011, 06:49:35 AM »
Likewise, I can still call an image that's been processed through photoshop or rendered in HDR to be photography.

I believe we've all heard this argument so many times, and honestly to each their own, it comes down to if you like what you do that is what matters.  Of the countless debates and discussions I've read on the issue these are some quotes I've pulled out from the discussions that put into context my overall opinion of it:

"I do expect that most people call Ansel Adams a photographer, even though his end product HAS been edited. Mathematically stitched panoramic images are also photographs; they just exceed the limitations of a particular lens."

There is a saying Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, what is cartoonish, over worked blurred chaff to one person maybe another's idea of perfection.

Keep doing what you like how you like it and wave a proverbial two fingered salute to the whinging wining crew that conform to their own warped sense of right and wrong.


Nope, do as you please. Vote on contests as you please. But don't expect others to follow your very narrow definition of photography. We're not all held to the limits of ethical photojournalism. Art holds a mirror to reality. Art is not reality.

Photography.... There is no right or wrong.

Very well put. Art is highly subjective and as such can never be labelled as 'wrong' because of applied techniques. An image can work for you or not.

Flake

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #44 on: January 26, 2011, 08:02:36 AM »
Or you could buy one of these:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Inspire-Live-View-wireless-Remote-Control-Canon-DSLR-/130474093876?pt=UK_Photography_DigitalCamAccess_RL&hash=item1e60dcad34

(I hate the HTML hyperlink!)

Touchscreens are not much use when the camera is 10 Metres up on a pole, or when you have the camera set up looking at wildlife and you want to be out of the way.

There's no way that at the present time any camera maker will give us a detachable fully wireless LCD, but the technology obviously exists for them to do it if they wanted to.

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Re: 5D Mark III / 6D from India
« Reply #44 on: January 26, 2011, 08:02:36 AM »