September 18, 2014, 05:50:19 PM

Author Topic: MIT researchers find a way to make glass that’s anti-fogging, self-cleaning and  (Read 1248 times)

KarstenReis

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An interesting article. I think the possibilities are pretty remarkable. Wasn't sure if this was the place to post but I figured it was the most relevant.

http://www.mit.edu/newsoffice/2012/glare-dust-and-fog-free-glass-0426.html

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Caps18

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I wonder hhow optically clear it is, and if you can make a lens out of it.
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JerryKnight

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I was really confused when I first saw this announcement from MIT on all the tech blogs, because multiple companies have been making "nano-coating" anti-wetting material (ie. NeverWet) for a while, so how is this MIT project any different? Maybe they are modifying the glass itself, instead of adding a layer to it. I haven't looked closely at the details, if they're even available.

I haven't seen any numbers, but it seems like the nano-coatings can quickly make the glass slightly hazy, depending on the coating thickness (which is related to the desired durability of the coating). I doubt you'd want to put it on any optical glass, but maybe MIT's glass is different.

Definitely want it on my car's windshield though. Heck, coat the whole car with the stuff. They've already coated cell phones and circuit boards, and it seems to work reasonably well.

EDIT:

FTA: "While some earlier work has treated solar panels with hydrophobic coatings, the new multifunctional surfaces created by the MIT team are even more effective at repelling water, keeping the panels clean longer, the researchers say. In addition, existing hydrophobic coatings do not prevent reflective losses, giving the new system yet another advantage."

So there you have it. MIT's glass is different than coatings, and it will probably be well suited for optics because of the reduction of reflections.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2012, 11:56:49 AM by JerryKnight »

Mt Spokane Photography

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Its likely time to apply for a new government research grant.  Thats when announcements like this are made.  Typically, they get a three or five year grant, so every 3-5 years we see another breakthru.  Research dollars is what its all about, its not about a usable process.
 
In short, don't expect a product soon.
 
Some Harvard research projects have been making fantastic claims and have been sucking in reasearch money for many years, black silicone is a example. It was announced by Harvard back in 1999,  the photos of the surface look very similar, maybe they just recycle them?
 
 
1999 - http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/1999/12.09/silicon.html
 
2001 - http://www.news.harvard.edu/gazette/2001/10.11/01-silicon.html
 
2008 - http://dcuser.net/others/black-silicon-may-lead-to-new-photo-sensors.html
 
2011  http://sionyx.com/2011/11/sionyx-imaging-awarded-3m-program-from-dod/
 
They are still pulling in big dollar government research grants.
 
 

prestonpalmer

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This is great!  Ive seen some other 3M glass that was similar.  Its funny how we see this technology then it just vanishes!  Lets hope this stuff makes its way to the consumer side!

helpful

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Sounds to me like the emperor who had no clothes! If such a kind of glass really existed, would it be able to refract light? Anti-fogging, self-cleaning, etc., seems like it is just a mist with no refractive properties. Really, I don't know why I'm responding to this post... just happened to pop up in front of me at the wrong time. :)

Like the second poster mentioned, it may be impossible to make a lens out of it. If it really exists, then perhaps it would be a great window glass, to shoot photos through. But it might not refract sufficiently to actually make a lens out of it.
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Mt Spokane Photography

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Sounds to me like the emperor who had no clothes! If such a kind of glass really existed, would it be able to refract light? Anti-fogging, self-cleaning, etc., seems like it is just a mist with no refractive properties. Really, I don't know why I'm responding to this post... just happened to pop up in front of me at the wrong time. :)

Like the second poster mentioned, it may be impossible to make a lens out of it. If it really exists, then perhaps it would be a great window glass, to shoot photos through. But it might not refract sufficiently to actually make a lens out of it.

Thats phase 4, there will be 3 phases of million Dollar government grants required before they get to that point. 
 
I'm all in favor of supporting research, but its a shame that Schools like Harvard make fantastic claims in order to get research money.  They have people actually expecting a product to happen, but that is a pretty unusual event.

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