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Author Topic: Starter Gear (newbie here)  (Read 5628 times)

recon photography

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Re: Starter Gear (newbie here)
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2012, 01:15:04 PM »
everything i have spent on training has essentially not been worth the money buy lenses and learn online there is endless information on the interwebs

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Re: Starter Gear (newbie here)
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2012, 01:15:04 PM »

Axilrod

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Re: Starter Gear (newbie here)
« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2012, 02:42:59 PM »
Yeah like the others said, I would try to focus on learning the camera and all the settings involved with DSLR's, it's totally different than shooting with a traditional camcorder.  I got a T2i right after they got released and it took a bit to learn Aperture, ISO, shutter speed, and essentially learning how to operate a camera with all manual controls.  These things have been around a while now, there are lots of DIY tutorials for shoulder rigs and things of that sort, but I'd focus on making these items a priority:

Camera - T4i looks great, but a used T3i or 60D would do just fine
Lenses - 18-135mm kit is a great lens to get you accustomed to focal lengths and learn what you like, but with it's variable aperture you may want to get the 50mm f/1.8 so you have something to shoot with in low light.
Battery Grip - An off-brand grip is just fine, I've never had problems with them.  The Rebel cameras are pretty tiny and the battery grip makes it feel a bit more solid (weight can be your friend with video).  Plus you get extended battery time.
Tripod- Simplest form of stabilization but very effective, handholding these cameras is a no-no (look into rolling shutter)
SD Cards - Make sure you get ones that are fast enough for video
Viewfinder or small monitor - They have some pretty cheap monitors out there, although I don't have much experience with them.  But a viewfinder to put on your LCD can be incredibly helpful for pulling focus and working in sunlight.  With the articulating screen it makes it even more helpful.  Here is a cheap option: http://www.amazon.com/Swi-View-LCDVF-Viewfinder-Canon-Cameras/dp/B004RG4MNE   
AudioThe built-in mics are pretty useless, so you need some type of external recorder for audio.  The Zoom H4N is somewhat standard nowadays, but if you're on a real budget the H1N would suffice for the time being ($100).   Sescom makes cables to hook up the Zoom into your camera so you don't have to worry about syncing up the audio in post. 
Slider - I know there are some cheap options out there, but sliders in general can really add a lot of professionalism to your videos.  I have a $3000 rig and even with that you'll never get shots as sexy as any slider, something about a camera gliding from left to right on a perfectly straight plane just looks awesome.  This isn't an essential piece, but definitely something to think about down the road. 

More than anything try not to worry about gear too much initially, just get out there and play around with your camera and you'll figure out what you need as time goes by.  Remember, your shutter speed is going to stay locked at 1/50 (50) if shooting 24fps and 1/60 (60) if shooting 30fps, so the only settings you really need to worry about are aperture and ISO. 

Also don't forget that there are tons of resources all over the web to help you learn DSLR video (this forum included).  DSLR Flim Noob and Dave Dugdale have some pretty good tutorials for beginners on Youtube.  Good luck man!
« Last Edit: June 12, 2012, 02:45:44 PM by Axilrod »
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VanWeddings

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Re: Starter Gear (newbie here)
« Reply #32 on: June 12, 2012, 04:05:45 PM »
i am a videographer. your needs for video will be different from stills. most people here are photographers and lots of things are the same for either, but there are some important differences.

1. because video demands a certain shutter speed, you WILL need an ND filter more than any other filter, a variable one if you can't be bothered to switch between a set all the time. forget UV filter, your ND will be protecting your glass and you don't want to stack filters too much. polarizers can double as a weak ND but you will need higher strength for outside shooting, which means ND.

i have the light craft workshop nd fader II and the singh ray vari nd. the lcw gets soft beyond 85mm but is fine for everything wider. the singh ray is fine even beyond 85mm but is a lot more expensive. get a 77mm or 82mm version so you only buy it once and use step up rings.

2. you WILL need a viewfinder to achieve good manual focus unless the t4i turns out to have godly auto focus. a cheap one off ebay will be fine for starting with.

3. the 50mm 1.8 is totally decent except for its crappy focus ring. you will be pulling manual focus in video so there are two ways to go. either get vintage manual focus lenses and adapters, or go for one of the samyang/rokinon manual lenses which have beautifully smooth focus rings.

the rest is up to you.

kdsand

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Re: Starter Gear (newbie here)
« Reply #33 on: June 12, 2012, 08:41:55 PM »
i am a videographer. your needs for video will be different from stills. most people here are photographers and lots of things are the same for either, but there are some important differences.

3. the 50mm 1.8 is totally decent except for its crappy focus ring. you will be pulling manual focus in video so there are two ways to go. either get vintage manual focus lenses and adapters, or go for one of the samyang/rokinon manual lenses which have beautifully smooth focus rings.

the rest is up to you.

Will the new 40 be a contender vs the nifty fifty for videos - looks like better build & has stm but $100 more and is 2.8..........
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VanWeddings

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Re: Starter Gear (newbie here)
« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2012, 11:40:55 PM »
Will the new 40 be a contender vs the nifty fifty for videos - looks like better build & has stm but $100 more and is 2.8..........

if the auto focus works well, the 40 will be useful. however it's still only 2.8 and 2.8 is not that shallow on a crop body. 1.8 though is quite shallow.

for video. a good vintage 50 1.4 plus adapter is cheaper and massively superior in terms of handling.

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Re: Starter Gear (newbie here)
« Reply #34 on: June 12, 2012, 11:40:55 PM »