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Author Topic: Macro shots.  (Read 2324 times)

Alumina

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Macro shots.
« on: June 12, 2012, 08:35:39 AM »
Hey Everyone! I'd like to show off my work a tiny bit. Anyone with tips and advice is welcome! (but don't be mean :( ) and please bear in mind that I'm only photographing since November 2011, and only had a macro lens since February this year. Everything is shot with a Rebel t3i and a 100mm f/2.8 USM lens (the 500dollar one)

This shot is one that I'm the most proud of :D
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

And I have lots more, but lets not make a huge topic here. I hope to get some feedback from you guys!

You can find more of my work here:
Deviantart
Flickr
My Website

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Macro shots.
« on: June 12, 2012, 08:35:39 AM »

Kernuak

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Re: Macro shots.
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2012, 09:33:19 AM »
Overall, you have a good eye for compostion. There will always be some difference of opinion, but generally, I think they all work. They also look sharp on the small versions, which is always the key to a good macro shot. One thing I will say though, is watch you don't overdo do it in post porocessing. One or two look a little oversharpened and some of the saturation is a little high. Sometimes you want the oversaturated look for artistic purposes, but often less is more, particularly in natural history. I find sometimes that a contrast boost (using curves) gives too much saturation and have to tone that down afterwards.
Canon 5D MkIII, 7D, 300mm L IS f/2.8 and a few other L's

Alumina

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Re: Macro shots.
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2012, 09:52:26 AM »
Overall, you have a good eye for compostion. There will always be some difference of opinion, but generally, I think they all work. They also look sharp on the small versions, which is always the key to a good macro shot. One thing I will say though, is watch you don't overdo do it in post porocessing. One or two look a little oversharpened and some of the saturation is a little high. Sometimes you want the oversaturated look for artistic purposes, but often less is more, particularly in natural history. I find sometimes that a contrast boost (using curves) gives too much saturation and have to tone that down afterwards.

Thank you! I tend to agree with you. I recently got a calibrated monitor and the amount of saturation etc is getting a bit to me. It didn't show it to me on my last monitor as it does on this one, so I'm definitely watching that. Sharpening I don't do though, so I can't do anything about that :P

Thank you so much for your feedback, really appreciate it!

pdirestajr

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Re: Macro shots.
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2012, 11:28:04 AM »
A trick to curves adjustments (if using PS) without affecting the colors is to set the curves layer blend mode to "luminosity".

If using LR or another editing program, you may have to adjust vibrance or saturation to compensate.
7D | 5DII | EOS-3 | Nikon F3 | Mamiya 645 Pro-TL

Pitbullo

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Re: Macro shots.
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2012, 06:25:24 AM »
They all look very good, and numer 4 is kind of similar to a shot I took today with almost identical gear, t2i (550D) and same lens as you. I bought the lens today, so I havent had too many tries yet, but your photos are very inspiring.

My shot:

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Re: Macro shots.
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2012, 06:25:24 AM »