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Author Topic: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.  (Read 10073 times)

Z

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #30 on: July 04, 2012, 10:51:54 AM »
It's very easy to criticise these photos from the armchair. Clearly the photog did not have enough time to make decent looking images and has limited experience on posing people (the 'dive' shot, anyone?  ???).

I feel sorry for him for the results of this shoot. He was probably rushed off his feet and stressed by people who have unrealistic expectations when someone more experienced/established (somebody mentioned Joe McNally) would probably have answered back along the lines of "Hang on... you're not going to get a portrait from me within 60 seconds."

The photographer probably decided it was better to have tripe than to have nothing. Hopefully he will learn from this assignment and it won't ruin his career too much.

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #30 on: July 04, 2012, 10:51:54 AM »

Razor2012

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #31 on: July 04, 2012, 11:51:43 AM »
ROFL that is terrible tis like a trainwreck, I cant look away!

his white seamless paper is a bit tatty

now why would they not have just got a real pro like joe mcnally to do this
I mean this is what a guy like him does, I doubt there is anyone on the planet that
could do a better job of this sort of shoot than joe


Agreed, This is laudable of fauxtography.

I could have done better with a rebel, 50mm, and a couple of whiteboards. >:(

I think if strapped a camera to my arse and wasnt looking I could have done better than that :P

Lol, that would make a good SNL skit.
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n0iZe

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #32 on: July 04, 2012, 03:31:32 PM »


WTF? i kept scrolling waiting for the rest of the picture to load until i realised that was it.
 :-[

now I know what you meant...picture of the year?  :o

I could've done better than this with my iPad 2.
I would even have been able to do an underwater shot with it, which the "photographer" couldn't do with whatever equipment he used.

Really embarrassing.

wickidwombat

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #33 on: July 04, 2012, 09:05:06 PM »
It's very easy to criticise these photos from the armchair. Clearly the photog did not have enough time to make decent looking images and has limited experience on posing people (the 'dive' shot, anyone?  ???).

I feel sorry for him for the results of this shoot. He was probably rushed off his feet and stressed by people who have unrealistic expectations when someone more experienced/established (somebody mentioned Joe McNally) would probably have answered back along the lines of "Hang on... you're not going to get a portrait from me within 60 seconds."

The photographer probably decided it was better to have tripe than to have nothing. Hopefully he will learn from this assignment and it won't ruin his career too much.

The athletes could have got better shots of them selves using iphones at arms length making facebook faces

and yes I would think that to present something as important as your national olympic team you may as well send the hat round and drum up enough coin to pay a real proffessional like joe mcnally to do it properly, shoot it all in a stadium.

I would rather have claimed i had a memory card failure and lost all the photos than actually post those on the internet regardless of time constraints
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Razor2012

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #35 on: July 06, 2012, 11:00:51 AM »
There is a follow-up article here.

http://m.watoday.com.au/olympics/news-london-2012/finally-the-web-draws-the-line-at-the-worlds-ugliest-photograph-of-michael-phelps-20120706-21l23.html

That actually explains quite abit.  I'm sure there were alot more 'bad' photos out there that we haven't seen.  I do feel for the guy though.
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iaind

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #36 on: July 06, 2012, 04:09:21 PM »
If the American athletes are despondent after their photo sessions can he do the Chinese Olympic Squad next
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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #36 on: July 06, 2012, 04:09:21 PM »

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #37 on: July 06, 2012, 11:27:41 PM »

picturesbyme

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #38 on: July 07, 2012, 09:16:47 AM »
The photographer explains his actions here.

http://www.petapixel.com/2012/07/06/photographer-joe-klamar-explains-his-controversial-olympic-portraits/

Preparation is key.

No. Just making excuses. (should have said that wasn't my day, sorry I messed up)
As one of the comments said it in that article: "Stop making excuses for this ...!"

Look at his "red carpet work"... even with the time issue those are just as bad snapshots as these.
How he got the job or the award for that photo is beyond me...




 

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #39 on: July 07, 2012, 11:31:11 AM »
I think it is interesting that they keep talking about 100 athletes in 3 days. There are many of us out there that shoot individual/team photos that eclipse that number in an afternoon.  He said he had a days notice...so he should have dropped everything, researched and gotten prepared. He wasn't asked to shoot the local baseball league...this was the Olympic team...you drop everything...immediately. And take every piece of gear you have. When I go on a shoot for team sports, I am bring 5 strobes (I use 2) and 3 small flashes, 3 bodies and every lens I have in addition to light modifiers, remotes, etc.  and I get asked why I bring so much gear to "take a picture"...and my reply is because "it's the gear I don't realize I need till I get there". It is more work lugging that stuff but better to have the gear and be prepared than to make excuses. 

It is easy to sit back and say "I could have done better"...but stop and think about everything involved from the environment to the other photogs, to dealing with the athletes, the stress, among other things. I can only imagine that sick feeling this poor guy has. But I bet you he will never go into a situation unprepared again. That's if this episode doesn't ruin him.
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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #40 on: July 07, 2012, 11:37:54 AM »
In recent years, there has been an increasing opinion by the masses, that anyone can get shots as good as professionals, if they have the right gear. This has been one of the drivers towards the slashing of budgets by (or for) photo editors. Yes, the recession has played its part, but how many previous recessions have resulted in photo editors trying to do things on the cheap? The digital age has certainly played its part in the exposure of photography, allowing people to take photographs with good gear to an extent that wasn't previously possible, but this has led to a number of myths and misconceptions. Perhaps this incident will act as a wake up call to photo editors and to organisers of such shoots, that the results achieved are important and to get good results, you have to have the proper planning and expertise. You may not have to have formal qualifications to get memorable photographs on a regular basis (as opposed to one-offs), but you certainly need to gain experience through hard work and practice and above all overall talent. Hopefully, it will make those in charge of budgets, that it is in their interests to pay for the level of photography that is needed, you get what you pay for and ultimately quality is what sells. If you have better imagery than your competitor magazines (for example), then provided the content is what the potential customers want, then you have an advantage.
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zim

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #41 on: July 07, 2012, 12:10:57 PM »
http://blogs.afp.com/correspondent/?post/2012/07/05/Pixels-and-piety%3A-Photographing-Olympic-icons

Some people posting comments on the Web seemed to get it. “I am not a professional photographer,” ‘jhydrazi’, began somewhat apologetically on reddit.com. “But these images are not bad… In fact, they have a quality that makes them feel real. REAL.”

hahahahahahahahahahahaha...........

“This is a whole other millennium,” said another comment, rather dramatically. “We don’t have to accept the airbrushed, Photoshopped concept of beauty any more. Photographers and art directors have done that forever, and lots of us would rather see what actually happened in front of the lens.”

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.........

I love the interweb

Aparently you're all wrong these are good honest pics, it's the subjects that are ugly  :o :o :o

Kernuak

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #42 on: July 07, 2012, 01:11:17 PM »
http://blogs.afp.com/correspondent/?post/2012/07/05/Pixels-and-piety%3A-Photographing-Olympic-icons

Some people posting comments on the Web seemed to get it. “I am not a professional photographer,” ‘jhydrazi’, began somewhat apologetically on reddit.com. “But these images are not bad… In fact, they have a quality that makes them feel real. REAL.”

hahahahahahahahahahahaha...........

“This is a whole other millennium,” said another comment, rather dramatically. “We don’t have to accept the airbrushed, Photoshopped concept of beauty any more. Photographers and art directors have done that forever, and lots of us would rather see what actually happened in front of the lens.”

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.........

I love the interweb

Aparently you're all wrong these are good honest pics, it's the subjects that are ugly  :o :o :o
And therein lies the problem. The public have become so used to seeing airbrushed photos, they think that is the only way that decent photos are produced. I've had a few people ask me (or someone where my photos were for sale) what I did to them to get the results. The fact is, call me old fashioned, but I like to get things right in camera as much as possible, rather than spend hours fixing what I got wrong. The heavy manipulation will ultimately damage photography as an art form if we aren't careful. There's nothing wrong with manipulation in the right circumstances, but in my opinion it should be declared and sold as digital art, not photography. There are moves now to declare when portraits have been airbrushed, but it's slow in being adopted from what I can see.
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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #42 on: July 07, 2012, 01:11:17 PM »

distant.star

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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #43 on: July 07, 2012, 01:23:12 PM »


.

There may be hope yet.

Wednesday I was shooting the local parade and a remembrance event. I kept bumping heads with another photographer. I didn't know him -- all I knew was he had a Nikon D3 and a lens as long as three Philly cheesesteaks. We were both on the same shots, same POV, etc.

The next day I saw his pictures on the Web site of the local newspaper. They were outstanding. I had no idea that publication actually used a real photographer. After some research I learned he did mostly sports shooting for them, so I'd never seen his work before.

Nice to know at least one newspaper is using a real photographer. Maybe the idea will spread!



In recent years, there has been an increasing opinion by the masses, that anyone can get shots as good as professionals, if they have the right gear. This has been one of the drivers towards the slashing of budgets by (or for) photo editors. Yes, the recession has played its part, but how many previous recessions have resulted in photo editors trying to do things on the cheap? The digital age has certainly played its part in the exposure of photography, allowing people to take photographs with good gear to an extent that wasn't previously possible, but this has led to a number of myths and misconceptions. Perhaps this incident will act as a wake up call to photo editors and to organisers of such shoots, that the results achieved are important and to get good results, you have to have the proper planning and expertise. You may not have to have formal qualifications to get memorable photographs on a regular basis (as opposed to one-offs), but you certainly need to gain experience through hard work and practice and above all overall talent. Hopefully, it will make those in charge of budgets, that it is in their interests to pay for the level of photography that is needed, you get what you pay for and ultimately quality is what sells. If you have better imagery than your competitor magazines (for example), then provided the content is what the potential customers want, then you have an advantage.
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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #44 on: July 07, 2012, 01:53:33 PM »
It's very easy to criticise these photos from the armchair. Clearly the photog did not have enough time to make decent looking images and has limited experience on posing people (the 'dive' shot, anyone?  ???).

I feel sorry for him for the results of this shoot. He was probably rushed off his feet and stressed by people who have unrealistic expectations when someone more experienced/established (somebody mentioned Joe McNally) would probably have answered back along the lines of "Hang on... you're not going to get a portrait from me within 60 seconds."

The photographer probably decided it was better to have tripe than to have nothing. Hopefully he will learn from this assignment and it won't ruin his career too much.
Rushed or not, if you are a real pro you create the time to make a good image. I don't agree that this person was rushed at all. This guy just don't know how to create a good portrait. Every image has serious lighting or composition flaws. Very poor.
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Re: Fauxtographer Ruins Olympic photos.
« Reply #44 on: July 07, 2012, 01:53:33 PM »