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Author Topic: Flash in animal eyes  (Read 3431 times)

rpt

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Flash in animal eyes
« on: July 27, 2012, 11:56:05 PM »
This is my dog. I took the picture this morning with a fill in flash. The eyes stand out as yellow. I have no idea what to do about it. Any advise is welcome. I have done red eye reduction for human eyes but this has got me stumped... Here is the picture:

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Flash in animal eyes
« on: July 27, 2012, 11:56:05 PM »

Kernuak

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2012, 05:08:50 AM »
I don't know of any post processing you can do, short of cloning from somewhere else, but using off camera flash should avoid the problem.
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rpt

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2012, 10:22:18 PM »
I don't know of any post processing you can do, short of cloning from somewhere else, but using off camera flash should avoid the problem.
Thanks. That makes sense. Duh! Should have figured that myself  :)

SandyP

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2012, 06:05:52 AM »
Yes, the big reason you see this is because it's so direct. If it were on a slightly different angle from pointing straight into the eyes, you wouldn't get this.

When shooting people with glasses on you run into similar type problems of seeing reflections in peoples glasses. You can solve that problem (and this one, which is really the same sort of thing) by getting the flash(es) off center.

Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2012, 11:57:17 AM »
You can substitute the yellow for another color in photoshop, but I'd just take another photo with indirect light.  Its only worth the effort to photoshop something like this when you have a photo that cannot be redone.

rpt

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2012, 09:01:25 PM »
Thanks guys. I will take another with her looking at a different angle. As I just have one 600EX and no ST-E3, the flash needs to stay on camera... Any other ideas? In the good old days one would have a long flash cord and have a second person hold the flash...

Ew

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2012, 09:42:27 PM »
Try bouncing the flash.
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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2012, 09:42:27 PM »

rpt

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2012, 10:43:24 PM »
Try bouncing the flash.
The shot was taken in the garden so I could not do that... Thanks.

wickidwombat

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2012, 11:56:34 PM »
Try bouncing the flash.
The shot was taken in the garden so I could not do that... Thanks.

get someone to hold a piece of white paper, cardboard hell a white pillow case or even aluminium foil from the kitchen above the flash and angle it at the dog then bounce off that
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briansquibb

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #9 on: July 31, 2012, 12:48:21 AM »
Have to use the flash off body, a flash bracket works.

Some animals such as sheep and goats are even harder due to the construction of their eyes


wtlloyd

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #10 on: July 31, 2012, 02:09:34 AM »
Lightroom or Photoshop - select the pupil (the color is caused by the light bouncing off the retina inside the eye) and feather your selection slightly to taste. Reduce the saturation and luminosity.

dr croubie

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #11 on: July 31, 2012, 02:34:44 AM »
In the good old days one would have a long flash cord and have a second person hold the flash...


You can these days, too
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drjlo

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2012, 02:41:03 AM »
I was surprised by this strong reflection since the flash was behind and side to the rabbit's eye..


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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #12 on: July 31, 2012, 02:41:03 AM »

Ellen Schmidtee

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #13 on: July 31, 2012, 03:48:30 AM »
I was surprised by this strong reflection since the flash was behind and side to the rabbit's eye.

Cats have a night vision aid in the form of - for the lack of a better word - bio-mirror behind their retina, which doubles the amount of light reaching the retina. The light bouncing back causes the cat's eye to glow in the dark.

Possibly, rabbits have the same night vision aid, causing their eyes to glow.

As the glow looks red, maybe the does bounce off blood vessels behind the retina, and the eyes glow because of larger pupil - my impression is the whole eye glows.

Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #14 on: July 31, 2012, 11:27:41 AM »
Thanks guys. I will take another with her looking at a different angle. As I just have one 600EX and no ST-E3, the flash needs to stay on camera... Any other ideas? In the good old days one would have a long flash cord and have a second person hold the flash...

Many people do exactly this.  You can buy a cord and hold or mount the flash away from the camera.
The real thing is expensive, but knock offs exist for those who are occasional users, or do not mind tossing them if the wear out.
Example:  http://www.ebay.com/itm/3M-Cable-OC-E3-TTL-Off-Camera-Flash-Remote-Cord-For-Canon-Speedlite-EOS-580EX-II-/180941382301?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a20f2629d

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Re: Flash in animal eyes
« Reply #14 on: July 31, 2012, 11:27:41 AM »