December 21, 2014, 10:45:02 PM

Author Topic: What to tell a newbie?  (Read 4555 times)

hhelmbold

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 119
    • View Profile
What to tell a newbie?
« on: August 14, 2012, 01:39:35 PM »
Today I came to a realization that Canon is indeed behind in the current camera market. I LOVE Canon products and LOVE my 1D X, but I also give training to new and upcoming photographers. I get a lot of questions on what camera to buy and what is the best camera and of course I know the best camera is the one you have in your hands, but how do you currently advise a new photographer to buy Canon if they just cannot deliver?

For example... I have someone who wants a camera to use when going overseas for travelling and holiday purposes (Powershot G1X will work here) and not sure if they will get serious about photography. But they also go away to a game farm frequently and wants to get a bit closer to the birds and wildlife. (SLR territory) Video is a nice to have feature seeing that it will also be a family camera.

Now newbies don't have a clue about ISO and shutterspeed and aperture and focal length etc - they want to push the button and get a great shot. Of course they will be disappointed and then they want to learn more on how to get the better shot.

Comparing Cameras AND availability just showed me once again that Canon has seriously dropped the ball. For what this student want the EOS 600D would be sufficient, but why force him to buy a Canon because I like Canon if the D3200 is clearly the better choice? I am comparing with the EOS 600D, because Canon had to recall the EOS 650D, once again, and it is not available - so in my opinion that isn't even a contender for someone who is burning to buy a camera.

I advised about 3 or 4 people in the last week to buy Nikon, and it really hurt! I still love my Canon gear, but Canon left a deep scar with the delays of the 1D X, the delays in the 5D III and now the EOS 650.

My only way of staying positive is believing they have something big up their sleeves... a game changer. Canon was the first to release a full frame DSLR and this made A LOT of Nikon users switch to Canon and they got a big market share there. Canon will have to bring out another miracle like the full frame DSLR - or they will lose all that ground they built up with it...

canon rumors FORUM

What to tell a newbie?
« on: August 14, 2012, 01:39:35 PM »

Z

  • EOS M2
  • ****
  • Posts: 189
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2012, 02:04:39 PM »
I advised about 3 or 4 people in the last week to buy Nikon, and it really hurt! I still love my Canon gear, but Canon left a deep scar with the delays of the 1D X, the delays in the 5D III and now the EOS 650.

Why did it hurt? Brand loyalty won't improve anyone's photographs. On the other hand I would say there is no clear winner between the 650D and the D3200. The D3200 has more pixels and better DR (the standard 'Nikon advantage' these days) but just 1 of its 11 AF points is a cross-type versus all 9 of the Canon's. Plus a flippy-outy screen and pseudo-video autofocus might be important to a beginner.

Maybe in future you could forego any sense of guilt by telling them that the two/three/four obvious choices are the 650D, D3200 and whatever else, and that they should go to a camera store who will allow them to play with each of these cameras for a bit, to see what fits them best. For a newbie the feel of a camera will be more important than the megapixels or dynamic range - and they might just prefer shooting with the Pentax after all.

Tcapp

  • Canon 7D MK II
  • *****
  • Posts: 510
    • View Profile
    • Timothy Capp Photography
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2012, 02:52:41 PM »
Today I came to a realization that Canon is indeed behind in the current camera market. I LOVE Canon products and LOVE my 1D X, but I also give training to new and upcoming photographers. I get a lot of questions on what camera to buy and what is the best camera and of course I know the best camera is the one you have in your hands, but how do you currently advise a new photographer to buy Canon if they just cannot deliver?

For example... I have someone who wants a camera to use when going overseas for travelling and holiday purposes (Powershot G1X will work here) and not sure if they will get serious about photography. But they also go away to a game farm frequently and wants to get a bit closer to the birds and wildlife. (SLR territory) Video is a nice to have feature seeing that it will also be a family camera.

Now newbies don't have a clue about ISO and shutterspeed and aperture and focal length etc - they want to push the button and get a great shot. Of course they will be disappointed and then they want to learn more on how to get the better shot.

Comparing Cameras AND availability just showed me once again that Canon has seriously dropped the ball. For what this student want the EOS 600D would be sufficient, but why force him to buy a Canon because I like Canon if the D3200 is clearly the better choice? I am comparing with the EOS 600D, because Canon had to recall the EOS 650D, once again, and it is not available - so in my opinion that isn't even a contender for someone who is burning to buy a camera.

I advised about 3 or 4 people in the last week to buy Nikon, and it really hurt! I still love my Canon gear, but Canon left a deep scar with the delays of the 1D X, the delays in the 5D III and now the EOS 650.

My only way of staying positive is believing they have something big up their sleeves... a game changer. Canon was the first to release a full frame DSLR and this made A LOT of Nikon users switch to Canon and they got a big market share there. Canon will have to bring out another miracle like the full frame DSLR - or they will lose all that ground they built up with it...

Sigh... Why does everyone always get so caught up on just the camera bodies. The lenses are a huge consideration when buying into a system, not just the body. Sure, the nikon body might have more resolution or more dynamic range, but what it doesn't have is that awesome canon glass.
5DIII, 5DII, 7D, 50 1.4, 85 1.4, 70-200 2.8 IS L, 70-200 2.8 IS L II, 2x TC III, 15 Fisheye 2.8, 100 Macro 2.8, 24 1.4 L
http://www.TimothyCapp.com
Follow me on facebook! https://www.facebook.com/pages/Timothy-Capp-Photography/94664798952

Halfrack

  • Canon 7D MK II
  • *****
  • Posts: 495
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2012, 03:08:32 PM »
Lots of us get these questions.  I push folks to Roger (LR) to 'try before you buy'.

What's funny is the number of folks that need to understand the give and take between the types of cameras around.  These '12 packages for xyz' on sites tend to be too general - if they work to being with.  This really is where the local camera store could do a lot of education, but their margins are thin and when you have someone asking for your time, but shopping online, it sucks.
"Me owning a lens shop is kind of like having an alcoholic bar tender." - Roger Cicala

Razor2012

  • 5D Mark III
  • ******
  • Posts: 635
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2012, 03:25:05 PM »
Today I came to a realization that Canon is indeed behind in the current camera market. I LOVE Canon products and LOVE my 1D X, but I also give training to new and upcoming photographers. I get a lot of questions on what camera to buy and what is the best camera and of course I know the best camera is the one you have in your hands, but how do you currently advise a new photographer to buy Canon if they just cannot deliver?

For example... I have someone who wants a camera to use when going overseas for travelling and holiday purposes (Powershot G1X will work here) and not sure if they will get serious about photography. But they also go away to a game farm frequently and wants to get a bit closer to the birds and wildlife. (SLR territory) Video is a nice to have feature seeing that it will also be a family camera.

Now newbies don't have a clue about ISO and shutterspeed and aperture and focal length etc - they want to push the button and get a great shot. Of course they will be disappointed and then they want to learn more on how to get the better shot.

Comparing Cameras AND availability just showed me once again that Canon has seriously dropped the ball. For what this student want the EOS 600D would be sufficient, but why force him to buy a Canon because I like Canon if the D3200 is clearly the better choice? I am comparing with the EOS 600D, because Canon had to recall the EOS 650D, once again, and it is not available - so in my opinion that isn't even a contender for someone who is burning to buy a camera.

I advised about 3 or 4 people in the last week to buy Nikon, and it really hurt! I still love my Canon gear, but Canon left a deep scar with the delays of the 1D X, the delays in the 5D III and now the EOS 650.

My only way of staying positive is believing they have something big up their sleeves... a game changer. Canon was the first to release a full frame DSLR and this made A LOT of Nikon users switch to Canon and they got a big market share there. Canon will have to bring out another miracle like the full frame DSLR - or they will lose all that ground they built up with it...

People just getting into photography should be learning the basics about taking pictures and using their cameras not about the politics.  They can decide for themselves later on which gear best suits them.  That's a decision only they can make.
5D MKIII w grip, 70-200 2.8L IS II, 24-70 2.8L II, 16-35 2.8L II, 100 2.8L IS macro, 600EX-RT

nebugeater

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 84
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2012, 03:33:51 PM »
I am just an amature myself but I still get asked by people that I know what they should get to get started. 

My answer is almost always start with something recent but used.  Get a decent body and one good lens.  See where it goes from there.  IF you are not developing an interest you can get out for about what you spent to get in.  If as you devlope you learn a bit about what your interest is and what you want to shoot then you are not sunk in high $$ equipment and can make a change.  The people that ask what do I need often cannot even say what they want to do other than take better pictures than my P&S.  IMO there is nothing wrong with that aproach but there is no reason to go broke finding out if it is really something you want or just thuink you want.

crasher8

  • Guest
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2012, 03:37:02 PM »
It's true, no one has taken a decent photograph until the last batch of Nikons were released.

I take better images with my 40 year old rangefinder than I did with my 300D. Why? Because I invested in my education. Anyone busting into photography might want to   consider a simple body and a prime, shooting on manual and taking a course. You don't give a Maserati to a 15 year old with a permit do you?

canon rumors FORUM

Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #6 on: August 14, 2012, 03:37:02 PM »

preppyak

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 807
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #7 on: August 14, 2012, 03:48:49 PM »
Sigh... Why does everyone always get so caught up on just the camera bodies. The lenses are a huge consideration when buying into a system, not just the body. Sure, the nikon body might have more resolution or more dynamic range, but what it doesn't have is that awesome canon glass.
Yep, does Nikon have the 100-400L or 400mm f/5.6 as cheap options for if he gets into wildlife photography? Maybe he needs something like a G1X for travel, and a DSLR with a tele lens wildlife. Canon suits him quite nicely there, and better than Nikon's offerings. Whether the D3200 is better or not is irrelevant if his only option is the Nikon 300mm or $5000+ lenses.

If you're a teacher, you should be taking the broad view of things. Sure, I'd tell a landscape photographer to go Nikon, because their future is the D800 and the 14-24. For wildlife, Canon would easily be the winner for me. For someone with a video heavy focus, I might point them to Panasonic. For someone wanting to do a bit of everything, I still think Canon is a great option because they have great variety

RLPhoto

  • Canon EF 300mm f/2.8L IS II
  • ********
  • Posts: 3544
  • Gear doesn't matter, Just a Matter of Convenience.
    • View Profile
    • My Portfolio
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #8 on: August 14, 2012, 03:49:31 PM »
Canon is behind on sensor tech. But that's not why Im here in the canon camp.

Its the Ub3r Primes canon has with no nikon equivalents in price, speed or quality. 8)

24L II

50L

85L II

135L

« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 03:51:07 PM by RLPhoto »

LSV

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 80
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #9 on: August 14, 2012, 04:11:21 PM »
Very easy, tell them there are great beginner's DSLR cameras under every brand.  Chances are they'll stick with the same brand as the Point and Shoot cameras that they currently have.

Razor2012

  • 5D Mark III
  • ******
  • Posts: 635
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #10 on: August 14, 2012, 04:34:21 PM »
Canon is behind on sensor tech. But that's not why Im here in the canon camp.

Its the Ub3r Primes canon has with no nikon equivalents in price, speed or quality. 8)

24L II

50L

85L II

135L

and the 70-200 2.8II!  ;) 8)
5D MKIII w grip, 70-200 2.8L IS II, 24-70 2.8L II, 16-35 2.8L II, 100 2.8L IS macro, 600EX-RT

Dylan777

  • Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *********
  • Posts: 4369
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2012, 04:51:12 PM »
Canon is behind on sensor tech. But that's not why Im here in the canon camp.

Its the Ub3r Primes canon has with no nikon equivalents in price, speed or quality. 8)

24L II

50L

85L II

135L

and the 70-200 2.8II!  ;) 8)

and 24-70 mrk II  ;D
Bodies: 1DX -- 5D III
Zooms: 16-35L f4 IS -- 24-70L II -- 70-200L f2.8 IS II
Primes: 40mm -- 85L II -- 135L -- 200L f2 IS -- 400L f2.8 IS II

Razor2012

  • 5D Mark III
  • ******
  • Posts: 635
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2012, 06:18:51 PM »
Canon is behind on sensor tech. But that's not why Im here in the canon camp.

Its the Ub3r Primes canon has with no nikon equivalents in price, speed or quality. 8)

24L II

50L

85L II

135L

and the 70-200 2.8II!  ;) 8)

and 24-70 mrk II  ;D

Yes that one too.  I hope that baby lives up to the specs.
5D MKIII w grip, 70-200 2.8L IS II, 24-70 2.8L II, 16-35 2.8L II, 100 2.8L IS macro, 600EX-RT

canon rumors FORUM

Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #12 on: August 14, 2012, 06:18:51 PM »

hhelmbold

  • Rebel T5i
  • ****
  • Posts: 119
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2012, 01:50:13 AM »
Wow - this got a lot more feedback than I expected  ;D

I can't quote on everyones comments else I will create one extra page with a lot of duplicate content hehehe...

Why did it hurt? Brand loyalty won't improve anyone's photographs.

No it doesn't and I did mention that in my original post, but you get loyal to a brand because it offers you something that no other brand can, maybe not technical, even an emotional connection can keep you loyal. And you are all correct about the glass... But everyone here is talking out of experience. And personal experience hardly ever motivates a beginner on a tight budget. They do not look at future glass investments or care about learning more about photography first (I am talking about the average 35 year+ home user here) they want to buy a camera now with as little money as possible but that can do as much as possible. My experience is that you can tell them camera A is the best camera for you and they will still buy camera F because they got a good deal and the salesman told them it is as good as camera A.

It all comes down to personal choice...

But overall I am saying that Canon is missing a crucial market here. Just about all the replies here is about the amazing glass Canon offers - but for a newbie buying a great lens only comes much later... after they invested in one or two camera bodies first. They might even buy a flash before considering a better lens. And from experience we know you should almost buy the CANON lens first, but in reality people don't think like that.

I also agree 100% that the D3200 isn't necessarily better than the EOS 650D... but it is on the shelf. I think that beats any camera on paper


Hillsilly

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 799
    • View Profile
Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2012, 03:00:05 AM »
Now newbies don't have a clue about ISO and shutterspeed and aperture and focal length etc - they want to push the button and get a great shot. Of course they will be disappointed and then they want to learn more on how to get the better shot.

I think you've answered your own question.  If people are interested enough to take one of your courses and learn more about photography, it shouldn't really matter what camera body they start with.  What's more important is buying into a system that gives flexibility and options.  Because, as newcomers, they're probably not going to know initially where their long term interests really lie.  I've come across some new Nikon buyers who are now a bit disillusioned that Nikon only offers some lenses in top dollar format.  Canon offers more choices at varying price levels - especially at the longer end.  And to my sister who chose some D5000 thing and now wants to start shooting sports on a budget, ha ha, I told you so.
Camera Obscura

canon rumors FORUM

Re: What to tell a newbie?
« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2012, 03:00:05 AM »