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Author Topic: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)  (Read 4326 times)

HeavenHell

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My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« on: August 20, 2012, 07:09:21 PM »
So I grabbed my 7D mounted with a 70-200 f/4 IS and sat on stool on my sister's deck and waited for something to visit her feeders.  She mentioned that hummingbird's frequented them several times a day.

I didn't have much faith that I was going to see one and if I did that the photos would turn out any good.  Well, sure enough one visited after only about 20 minutes.  I took five photos.  Here are three that I was pretty happy with.  I know the composition isn't the greatest, but I think I did a pretty good job at freezing the action in two of them.







They are really pretty birds, aren't they?
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24-105 f/4L, 70-200 f/4L, 85 f1.8, 100 f/2.8 Macro, 50 f/1.4, 17-55 f/2.8, Tamron 90 f/2.8, 70-300 L

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My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« on: August 20, 2012, 07:09:21 PM »

rwmson

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2012, 07:29:05 AM »
Nothing wrong with that bottom shot!
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bjd

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2012, 12:33:27 PM »
So I grabbed my 7D mounted with a 70-200 f/4 IS and sat on stool on my sister's deck and waited for something to visit her feeders.  She mentioned that hummingbird's frequented them several times a day.

I didn't have much faith that I was going to see one and if I did that the photos would turn out any good.  Well, sure enough one visited after only about 20 minutes.  I took five photos.  Here are three that I was pretty happy with.  I know the composition isn't the greatest, but I think I did a pretty good job at freezing the action in two of them.

They are really pretty birds, aren't they?

Nice shots. How did you focus? I ask because I am trying to capture small birds in flight, on a 5D3. But I guess a
hummingbird will hover a while in some places, different to other small birds that just fly away. What exposure
time did you set to freeze the wings?

Cheers Brian

Kernuak

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2012, 05:37:05 PM »
So I grabbed my 7D mounted with a 70-200 f/4 IS and sat on stool on my sister's deck and waited for something to visit her feeders.  She mentioned that hummingbird's frequented them several times a day.

I didn't have much faith that I was going to see one and if I did that the photos would turn out any good.  Well, sure enough one visited after only about 20 minutes.  I took five photos.  Here are three that I was pretty happy with.  I know the composition isn't the greatest, but I think I did a pretty good job at freezing the action in two of them.

They are really pretty birds, aren't they?

Nice shots. How did you focus? I ask because I am trying to capture small birds in flight, on a 5D3. But I guess a
hummingbird will hover a while in some places, different to other small birds that just fly away. What exposure
time did you set to freeze the wings?

Cheers Brian
Actually, it's surprising how many birds do hover for short periods, it's only when you try to photograph them in feeding areas, that you notice it. That's one thing with photography, it can show behaviour you would otherwise miss. I've also photographed small birds flying backwards.
Canon 5D MkIII, 7D, 300mm L IS f/2.8 and a few other L's

HeavenHell

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2012, 07:38:46 PM »
Photo 1
Shutter speed: 1/800 sec
Aperature: f/4.5
ISO speed: 400

Photo 2
Shutter speed: 1/800 sec
Aperature: f/5.0
ISO speed: 400

Photo 3
Shutter speed: 1/500 sec
Aperature: f/4.5
ISO speed: 200
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nonac

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2012, 08:48:45 PM »
They are fun to shoot.  I've shot hundreds of pics of them this year.  Here is a tip for you to catch one in a natural environment. Find a flower that they like such as a basket of petunias and hang it close to the feeder.  Then when you get ready to shoot, mix up some of their food and put it in a spray bottle.  Lightly spray the inside of several of the flowers on the plant.  Trust me they will find the "nectar" that you added to the flowers.  It may take some patience but you can get some great shots this way. 

Thie pic I attached was with my 5d MkIII, 100-400L lens. Shot at 400mm, 1/640 sec @f/8.0, ISO 400. The picture is cropped to about half of its original size.
5d Mark III, 24mm f/1.4L II, 24-105 f/4L IS, 70-200 f/2.8L IS II, 100 f/2.8L IS macro, 135 f/2L, 3x 600EX-RT, ST-E3-RT, EF 1.4x III

HeavenHell

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2012, 08:59:14 PM »
Oh WOW nonac, that's a fantastic photo.
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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2012, 08:59:14 PM »

Ryan708

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2012, 09:39:55 PM »
yeah Im really thinking I want a 100-400
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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2012, 09:42:00 PM »
They are fun to shoot.  I've shot hundreds of pics of them this year.  Here is a tip for you to catch one in a natural environment. Find a flower that they like such as a basket of petunias and hang it close to the feeder.  Then when you get ready to shoot, mix up some of their food and put it in a spray bottle.  Lightly spray the inside of several of the flowers on the plant.  Trust me they will find the "nectar" that you added to the flowers.  It may take some patience but you can get some great shots this way. 

Thie pic I attached was with my 5d MkIII, 100-400L lens. Shot at 400mm, 1/640 sec @f/8.0, ISO 400. The picture is cropped to about half of its original size.

Mine is with a 5D3, 70-200 IS II at 200mm, 1/2000 sec F3.5, ISO1000..  It is cropped at around 1/6 the size (sorta.. it is very cropped)

What kind of autofocus do you use? I was using 9 point zone AF in AI Servo but it was hard most of my shots were out of focus, and the hummingbirds would move so fast...

All point AF was impossible, it was supposed to start with the single center point and start tracking from there.. but it would, just, not, pick up the bird...

I was also using the "case 5" AF.. for erratic subjects moving quickly in any direction.

nonac

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2012, 09:48:23 PM »
yeah Im really thinking I want a 100-400

I really like my 100-400 and have got some really good shots over the last couple of years since I bought it.  Some people don't like the push-pull zoom of the lens, but it doesn't bother me.
5d Mark III, 24mm f/1.4L II, 24-105 f/4L IS, 70-200 f/2.8L IS II, 100 f/2.8L IS macro, 135 f/2L, 3x 600EX-RT, ST-E3-RT, EF 1.4x III

nonac

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2012, 09:54:26 PM »
They are fun to shoot.  I've shot hundreds of pics of them this year.  Here is a tip for you to catch one in a natural environment. Find a flower that they like such as a basket of petunias and hang it close to the feeder.  Then when you get ready to shoot, mix up some of their food and put it in a spray bottle.  Lightly spray the inside of several of the flowers on the plant.  Trust me they will find the "nectar" that you added to the flowers.  It may take some patience but you can get some great shots this way. 

Thie pic I attached was with my 5d MkIII, 100-400L lens. Shot at 400mm, 1/640 sec @f/8.0, ISO 400. The picture is cropped to about half of its original size.

I use 9 point on most unless I can get them to hover in one spot for a few seconds.  On this particular picture I'm pretty sure that I had it on single point focused right on the eye.  One thing that makes them tough to get with the 9 point while they are in the air is that the autofocus sometimes gets confused because of those wings that are moving so fast.  It doesn't know what to focus on.  I've spent hours and hours shooting them and I have learned different things along the way.

Mine is with a 5D3, 70-200 IS II at 200mm, 1/2000 sec F3.5, ISO1000..  It is cropped at around 1/6 the size (sorta.. it is very cropped)

What kind of autofocus do you use? I was using 9 point zone AF in AI Servo but it was hard most of my shots were out of focus, and the hummingbirds would move so fast...

All point AF was impossible, it was supposed to start with the single center point and start tracking from there.. but it would, just, not, pick up the bird...

I was also using the "case 5" AF.. for erratic subjects moving quickly in any direction.
5d Mark III, 24mm f/1.4L II, 24-105 f/4L IS, 70-200 f/2.8L IS II, 100 f/2.8L IS macro, 135 f/2L, 3x 600EX-RT, ST-E3-RT, EF 1.4x III

DMITPHOTO

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2012, 09:58:14 PM »
Really like the 2nd and 3rd photo!! I'm shocked you caught those fast suckers at 1/800 lol  :P

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2012, 12:15:48 AM »
The 100-400mmL and the 300mm f/4 are excellent for small birds that will let you get close due to their short mfd and high magnification.  The 70-200mm f/4L is also excellent, but benefits from a TC.
One of the things that concerns me with a non push pull new 100-400mmL is they might do away with that short mfd.

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2012, 12:15:48 AM »

bjd

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2012, 11:21:37 PM »
Actually, it's surprising how many birds do hover for short periods, it's only when you try to photograph them in feeding areas, that you notice it. That's one thing with photography, it can show behaviour you would otherwise miss. I've also photographed small birds flying backwards.

I do relax sometimes by just sitting quietly about 3-4 meters from our feeders and observing what is going on.
Sad really!
Still most small birds are too fast and too erratic.

Please read my pleas for help in

AF just does not work for me on the 5D3 with these subjects.

Cheers Brian

Ewinter

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2012, 11:37:13 PM »
They are fun to shoot.  I've shot hundreds of pics of them this year.  Here is a tip for you to catch one in a natural environment. Find a flower that they like such as a basket of petunias and hang it close to the feeder.  Then when you get ready to shoot, mix up some of their food and put it in a spray bottle.  Lightly spray the inside of several of the flowers on the plant.  Trust me they will find the "nectar" that you added to the flowers.  It may take some patience but you can get some great shots this way. 

Thie pic I attached was with my 5d MkIII, 100-400L lens. Shot at 400mm, 1/640 sec @f/8.0, ISO 400. The picture is cropped to about half of its original size.

Mine is with a 5D3, 70-200 IS II at 200mm, 1/2000 sec F3.5, ISO1000..  It is cropped at around 1/6 the size (sorta.. it is very cropped)

What kind of autofocus do you use? I was using 9 point zone AF in AI Servo but it was hard most of my shots were out of focus, and the hummingbirds would move so fast...

All point AF was impossible, it was supposed to start with the single center point and start tracking from there.. but it would, just, not, pick up the bird...

I was also using the "case 5" AF.. for erratic subjects moving quickly in any direction.
You said it was really cropped? How big was the hummignbird relativ
e to the af point? It sounds like with a 70-200 on ff you just didn't have enough reach to allow the af to perform at it's best

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Re: My first attempt at stop action (hummingbirds)
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2012, 11:37:13 PM »