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Author Topic: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L  (Read 4510 times)

castillophotodesign

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« Last Edit: September 12, 2012, 09:41:16 PM by castillophotodesign »
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Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« on: August 29, 2012, 07:53:16 AM »

Fotofanten

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2012, 08:55:29 AM »
Hi Castillo. That's a very nice portrait. I love low key in general. The more ink the better :) She looks like a kind, loving person.

Couple of thoughts:
- the hand: to me at least, it's a bit distracting, and I would consider omitting it from the composition altogether.

- the lighting: I really like the subtleness of the lighting. I can barely tell if you used a kicker light and a background / separation light. You have chosen broad lighting, by lighting the side of her face that is showing the most. I would consider moving the key light to the other side to see if that had a more dramatic / slimming effect on the models face. Let's face it, all women love that which is slimming. Lastly, to nitpick even more, I don't care much for the tiny dash of light that is on the right side (her left side) of her mouth.

- the processing: does not look overprocessed, which is good. I would consider fiddling around a bit with the white balance though, to see if she lookes even better with a slightly cooler color temperature.

- the background: there is a dark vertical line there, but it does not really bother me. Maybe it even adds some interest. Studio portraits that are too perfect tend to be boring, so don't take my advice too seriously :)
« Last Edit: August 29, 2012, 08:58:44 AM by Fotofanten »
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castillophotodesign

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2012, 09:59:16 AM »
Hi Castillo. That's a very nice portrait. I love low key in general. The more ink the better :) She looks like a kind, loving person.

Couple of thoughts:
- the hand: to me at least, it's a bit distracting, and I would consider omitting it from the composition altogether.

- the lighting: I really like the subtleness of the lighting. I can barely tell if you used a kicker light and a background / separation light. You have chosen broad lighting, by lighting the side of her face that is showing the most. I would consider moving the key light to the other side to see if that had a more dramatic / slimming effect on the models face. Let's face it, all women love that which is slimming. Lastly, to nitpick even more, I don't care much for the tiny dash of light that is on the right side (her left side) of her mouth.

- the processing: does not look overprocessed, which is good. I would consider fiddling around a bit with the white balance though, to see if she lookes even better with a slightly cooler color temperature.

- the background: there is a dark vertical line there, but it does not really bother me. Maybe it even adds some interest. Studio portraits that are too perfect tend to be boring, so don't take my advice too seriously :)

Thank you so much for your input! i agree pretty much with everything that you said. I did this portrait for my 1st portraiture class in my photography program. All your observations made me realize that i need to pay even more attention to detail. your advice is very welcomed

Canon 5D Mark III & Canon EOS M
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awinphoto

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2012, 12:03:46 PM »
Looks like a good first whack on posing...  If you have the time, today and or tonight, creativelive.com is having a free webinar/seminar that should be looping through the night with a very good posing/glamour photographer...  perhaps you can take a peek and learn a bit as far as hands, etc...  Different people will give different suggestions... some will say "tummy away from the light for more slimming poses", which you did, however other will say to use short lighting (you did broad lighting on the face) gives more flattering facial portraits...  Also, the lighting technique you used was a semi rembrandt (triangle under the far side cheek)... While executed good, it doesn't quite do her justice...  It's generally seen as a harder, more serious and stand-offish setup... It's good if you want to convey that message, but otherwise...  The dark outfit slims her but also loses any shape in her figure which doesn't help either.  For my suggestions is for my own personal taste so take it with a pinch of salt...   If you want to keep lighting where it is, add a second fill light or bring your reflector camera right closer to outside frame to reduce the contrast in the rembrandt.  I would move the light more camera axis but slight off camera left giveing a mix of hollywood/butterfly lighting, but add refector below camera view filling shadows under nose and reducing contrast...  If light spills on the background, move subject forward or background back to create separation...  a longer lens then can be used...   Have her hand instead of resting on her hip, have is snake behind the small of her back which will hide the hand but also add curvature to back waist line and chest line...  curvature overall looks best for women...  If you want to keep it super low key the figure would look black vs a dark brown background which would give some hint to her figure... but to take it to the next level, add a kicker light 130 degrees camera right (or super big reflector if you have no more lights) that just lights her back... feel free to add flags or whatever so the light just hits her back but doesn't cause flare in the lens or spill on the front of her body....  This light will give just a glimmer of light accenting her body off and away from the background.  This shows her shape even more.  You can even ask her to kick out her hip slightly camera right and have her arm on that side lay against her hip giving more view of the curves...  Just some hints on where to go from here....  Very good start and with a few refinements you can become very very good.   
« Last Edit: August 29, 2012, 12:07:42 PM by awinphoto »
Canon 5d III, Canon 24-105L, Canon 17-40L, Canon 70-200 F4L, Canon 100L 2.8, Canon 85 1.8, 430EX 2's and a lot of bumps along the road to get to where I am.

castillophotodesign

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2012, 04:02:04 PM »
Looks like a good first whack on posing...  If you have the time, today and or tonight, creativelive.com is having a free webinar/seminar that should be looping through the night with a very good posing/glamour photographer...  perhaps you can take a peek and learn a bit as far as hands, etc...  Different people will give different suggestions... some will say "tummy away from the light for more slimming poses", which you did, however other will say to use short lighting (you did broad lighting on the face) gives more flattering facial portraits...  Also, the lighting technique you used was a semi rembrandt (triangle under the far side cheek)... While executed good, it doesn't quite do her justice...  It's generally seen as a harder, more serious and stand-offish setup... It's good if you want to convey that message, but otherwise...  The dark outfit slims her but also loses any shape in her figure which doesn't help either.  For my suggestions is for my own personal taste so take it with a pinch of salt...   If you want to keep lighting where it is, add a second fill light or bring your reflector camera right closer to outside frame to reduce the contrast in the rembrandt.  I would move the light more camera axis but slight off camera left giveing a mix of hollywood/butterfly lighting, but add refector below camera view filling shadows under nose and reducing contrast...  If light spills on the background, move subject forward or background back to create separation...  a longer lens then can be used...   Have her hand instead of resting on her hip, have is snake behind the small of her back which will hide the hand but also add curvature to back waist line and chest line...  curvature overall looks best for women...  If you want to keep it super low key the figure would look black vs a dark brown background which would give some hint to her figure... but to take it to the next level, add a kicker light 130 degrees camera right (or super big reflector if you have no more lights) that just lights her back... feel free to add flags or whatever so the light just hits her back but doesn't cause flare in the lens or spill on the front of her body....  This light will give just a glimmer of light accenting her body off and away from the background.  This shows her shape even more.  You can even ask her to kick out her hip slightly camera right and have her arm on that side lay against her hip giving more view of the curves...  Just some hints on where to go from here....  Very good start and with a few refinements you can become very very good.

thank you for your feedback and for giving me that link on creative live.com. I watched a lot of it and i leaned a couple tricks and techniques that I'm sure will be helpful in the future. 
Canon 5D Mark III & Canon EOS M
100mm Macro F2.8L, 70-200mm F2.8L IS II, 24-70 F2.8L II, Canon 100-400L, Canon 16-35 F2.8 L II, TC 1.4X, TC 2X

castillophotodesign

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2012, 04:03:57 PM »
I just published my new website where you can see my images in high resolution. Please take a look if you have the time

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awinphoto

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2012, 04:53:23 PM »
Looks like a good first whack on posing...  If you have the time, today and or tonight, creativelive.com is having a free webinar/seminar that should be looping through the night with a very good posing/glamour photographer...  perhaps you can take a peek and learn a bit as far as hands, etc...  Different people will give different suggestions... some will say "tummy away from the light for more slimming poses", which you did, however other will say to use short lighting (you did broad lighting on the face) gives more flattering facial portraits...  Also, the lighting technique you used was a semi rembrandt (triangle under the far side cheek)... While executed good, it doesn't quite do her justice...  It's generally seen as a harder, more serious and stand-offish setup... It's good if you want to convey that message, but otherwise...  The dark outfit slims her but also loses any shape in her figure which doesn't help either.  For my suggestions is for my own personal taste so take it with a pinch of salt...   If you want to keep lighting where it is, add a second fill light or bring your reflector camera right closer to outside frame to reduce the contrast in the rembrandt.  I would move the light more camera axis but slight off camera left giveing a mix of hollywood/butterfly lighting, but add refector below camera view filling shadows under nose and reducing contrast...  If light spills on the background, move subject forward or background back to create separation...  a longer lens then can be used...   Have her hand instead of resting on her hip, have is snake behind the small of her back which will hide the hand but also add curvature to back waist line and chest line...  curvature overall looks best for women...  If you want to keep it super low key the figure would look black vs a dark brown background which would give some hint to her figure... but to take it to the next level, add a kicker light 130 degrees camera right (or super big reflector if you have no more lights) that just lights her back... feel free to add flags or whatever so the light just hits her back but doesn't cause flare in the lens or spill on the front of her body....  This light will give just a glimmer of light accenting her body off and away from the background.  This shows her shape even more.  You can even ask her to kick out her hip slightly camera right and have her arm on that side lay against her hip giving more view of the curves...  Just some hints on where to go from here....  Very good start and with a few refinements you can become very very good.

thank you for your feedback and for giving me that link on creative live.com. I watched a lot of it and i leaned a couple tricks and techniques that I'm sure will be helpful in the future.

I'm glad you were able to catch the creativelive link...  also remember creativelive has new presenters every week seemingly and they are all free (while live)...  Looked at your website...  nice work..  I like your product work, very clean and simple.  Keep working with you portraits... I think you have a good eye but need to refine it a bit here and there to get exceptional.
Canon 5d III, Canon 24-105L, Canon 17-40L, Canon 70-200 F4L, Canon 100L 2.8, Canon 85 1.8, 430EX 2's and a lot of bumps along the road to get to where I am.

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2012, 04:53:23 PM »

castillophotodesign

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2012, 05:03:35 PM »
Looks like a good first whack on posing...  If you have the time, today and or tonight, creativelive.com is having a free webinar/seminar that should be looping through the night with a very good posing/glamour photographer...  perhaps you can take a peek and learn a bit as far as hands, etc...  Different people will give different suggestions... some will say "tummy away from the light for more slimming poses", which you did, however other will say to use short lighting (you did broad lighting on the face) gives more flattering facial portraits...  Also, the lighting technique you used was a semi rembrandt (triangle under the far side cheek)... While executed good, it doesn't quite do her justice...  It's generally seen as a harder, more serious and stand-offish setup... It's good if you want to convey that message, but otherwise...  The dark outfit slims her but also loses any shape in her figure which doesn't help either.  For my suggestions is for my own personal taste so take it with a pinch of salt...   If you want to keep lighting where it is, add a second fill light or bring your reflector camera right closer to outside frame to reduce the contrast in the rembrandt.  I would move the light more camera axis but slight off camera left giveing a mix of hollywood/butterfly lighting, but add refector below camera view filling shadows under nose and reducing contrast...  If light spills on the background, move subject forward or background back to create separation...  a longer lens then can be used...   Have her hand instead of resting on her hip, have is snake behind the small of her back which will hide the hand but also add curvature to back waist line and chest line...  curvature overall looks best for women...  If you want to keep it super low key the figure would look black vs a dark brown background which would give some hint to her figure... but to take it to the next level, add a kicker light 130 degrees camera right (or super big reflector if you have no more lights) that just lights her back... feel free to add flags or whatever so the light just hits her back but doesn't cause flare in the lens or spill on the front of her body....  This light will give just a glimmer of light accenting her body off and away from the background.  This shows her shape even more.  You can even ask her to kick out her hip slightly camera right and have her arm on that side lay against her hip giving more view of the curves...  Just some hints on where to go from here....  Very good start and with a few refinements you can become very very good.

thank you for your feedback and for giving me that link on creative live.com. I watched a lot of it and i leaned a couple tricks and techniques that I'm sure will be helpful in the future.

I'm glad you were able to catch the creativelive link...  also remember creativelive has new presenters every week seemingly and they are all free (while live)...  Looked at your website...  nice work..  I like your product work, very clean and simple.  Keep working with you portraits... I think you have a good eye but need to refine it a bit here and there to get exceptional.

Thank you so much! I know i need to build up my portfolio more. Specially for portraiture, its always been harder for me to photograph people, so I didnt do it as often. Now that I started my portraiture class I'm doing it more often and I should should be getting better portraits that i cant post in my site... Most of the ones I have were from a while ago and i didnt know the things I know now, just gotta get out there, shot more, and keep practicing
Canon 5D Mark III & Canon EOS M
100mm Macro F2.8L, 70-200mm F2.8L IS II, 24-70 F2.8L II, Canon 100-400L, Canon 16-35 F2.8 L II, TC 1.4X, TC 2X

awinphoto

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2012, 10:21:23 AM »
Looks like a good first whack on posing...  If you have the time, today and or tonight, creativelive.com is having a free webinar/seminar that should be looping through the night with a very good posing/glamour photographer...  perhaps you can take a peek and learn a bit as far as hands, etc...  Different people will give different suggestions... some will say "tummy away from the light for more slimming poses", which you did, however other will say to use short lighting (you did broad lighting on the face) gives more flattering facial portraits...  Also, the lighting technique you used was a semi rembrandt (triangle under the far side cheek)... While executed good, it doesn't quite do her justice...  It's generally seen as a harder, more serious and stand-offish setup... It's good if you want to convey that message, but otherwise...  The dark outfit slims her but also loses any shape in her figure which doesn't help either.  For my suggestions is for my own personal taste so take it with a pinch of salt...   If you want to keep lighting where it is, add a second fill light or bring your reflector camera right closer to outside frame to reduce the contrast in the rembrandt.  I would move the light more camera axis but slight off camera left giveing a mix of hollywood/butterfly lighting, but add refector below camera view filling shadows under nose and reducing contrast...  If light spills on the background, move subject forward or background back to create separation...  a longer lens then can be used...   Have her hand instead of resting on her hip, have is snake behind the small of her back which will hide the hand but also add curvature to back waist line and chest line...  curvature overall looks best for women...  If you want to keep it super low key the figure would look black vs a dark brown background which would give some hint to her figure... but to take it to the next level, add a kicker light 130 degrees camera right (or super big reflector if you have no more lights) that just lights her back... feel free to add flags or whatever so the light just hits her back but doesn't cause flare in the lens or spill on the front of her body....  This light will give just a glimmer of light accenting her body off and away from the background.  This shows her shape even more.  You can even ask her to kick out her hip slightly camera right and have her arm on that side lay against her hip giving more view of the curves...  Just some hints on where to go from here....  Very good start and with a few refinements you can become very very good.

thank you for your feedback and for giving me that link on creative live.com. I watched a lot of it and i leaned a couple tricks and techniques that I'm sure will be helpful in the future.

I'm glad you were able to catch the creativelive link...  also remember creativelive has new presenters every week seemingly and they are all free (while live)...  Looked at your website...  nice work..  I like your product work, very clean and simple.  Keep working with you portraits... I think you have a good eye but need to refine it a bit here and there to get exceptional.

Thank you so much! I know i need to build up my portfolio more. Specially for portraiture, its always been harder for me to photograph people, so I didnt do it as often. Now that I started my portraiture class I'm doing it more often and I should should be getting better portraits that i cant post in my site... Most of the ones I have were from a while ago and i didnt know the things I know now, just gotta get out there, shot more, and keep practicing

What school are you attending?  To be honest, i'm just like you where portraiture hasn't been my strong suit, but as the economy changes and the current situation we are in with companies cutting advertising budgets and such trying to keep in the black, we have been doing more portraiture and so I've been refining and restructuring my business to accommodate...   While I was at school, i would have thought it would be silly, but I would hesitate putting class assignments and such in your portfolio...  Not saying they aren't good, but, in hindsight you are shooting to appease an instructor and meet criteria for what they expect, but really your portfolio needs to be what you want to appease your prospective clientele and suit your tastes, not a teacher...  By all means do what you have to do to get great grades and advance in school, but from a person who has been in your shoes, While shooting for assignments, shoot an entirely different but related shoot (same model, location, etc), but do it for you... arrange lights the way you like them, tinker, experiment, fine what suits your tastes and find your brand and your look..  something where someone would want to hire you over uncle bob, shoot the heck out of those scenes, post those to your site.   

Brooks -2004
Canon 5d III, Canon 24-105L, Canon 17-40L, Canon 70-200 F4L, Canon 100L 2.8, Canon 85 1.8, 430EX 2's and a lot of bumps along the road to get to where I am.

castillophotodesign

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2012, 11:16:23 AM »
Looks like a good first whack on posing...  If you have the time, today and or tonight, creativelive.com is having a free webinar/seminar that should be looping through the night with a very good posing/glamour photographer...  perhaps you can take a peek and learn a bit as far as hands, etc...  Different people will give different suggestions... some will say "tummy away from the light for more slimming poses", which you did, however other will say to use short lighting (you did broad lighting on the face) gives more flattering facial portraits...  Also, the lighting technique you used was a semi rembrandt (triangle under the far side cheek)... While executed good, it doesn't quite do her justice...  It's generally seen as a harder, more serious and stand-offish setup... It's good if you want to convey that message, but otherwise...  The dark outfit slims her but also loses any shape in her figure which doesn't help either.  For my suggestions is for my own personal taste so take it with a pinch of salt...   If you want to keep lighting where it is, add a second fill light or bring your reflector camera right closer to outside frame to reduce the contrast in the rembrandt.  I would move the light more camera axis but slight off camera left giveing a mix of hollywood/butterfly lighting, but add refector below camera view filling shadows under nose and reducing contrast...  If light spills on the background, move subject forward or background back to create separation...  a longer lens then can be used...   Have her hand instead of resting on her hip, have is snake behind the small of her back which will hide the hand but also add curvature to back waist line and chest line...  curvature overall looks best for women...  If you want to keep it super low key the figure would look black vs a dark brown background which would give some hint to her figure... but to take it to the next level, add a kicker light 130 degrees camera right (or super big reflector if you have no more lights) that just lights her back... feel free to add flags or whatever so the light just hits her back but doesn't cause flare in the lens or spill on the front of her body....  This light will give just a glimmer of light accenting her body off and away from the background.  This shows her shape even more.  You can even ask her to kick out her hip slightly camera right and have her arm on that side lay against her hip giving more view of the curves...  Just some hints on where to go from here....  Very good start and with a few refinements you can become very very good.

thank you for your feedback and for giving me that link on creative live.com. I watched a lot of it and i leaned a couple tricks and techniques that I'm sure will be helpful in the future.

I'm glad you were able to catch the creativelive link...  also remember creativelive has new presenters every week seemingly and they are all free (while live)...  Looked at your website...  nice work..  I like your product work, very clean and simple.  Keep working with you portraits... I think you have a good eye but need to refine it a bit here and there to get exceptional.

Thank you so much! I know i need to build up my portfolio more. Specially for portraiture, its always been harder for me to photograph people, so I didnt do it as often. Now that I started my portraiture class I'm doing it more often and I should should be getting better portraits that i cant post in my site... Most of the ones I have were from a while ago and i didnt know the things I know now, just gotta get out there, shot more, and keep practicing

What school are you attending?  To be honest, i'm just like you where portraiture hasn't been my strong suit, but as the economy changes and the current situation we are in with companies cutting advertising budgets and such trying to keep in the black, we have been doing more portraiture and so I've been refining and restructuring my business to accommodate...   While I was at school, i would have thought it would be silly, but I would hesitate putting class assignments and such in your portfolio...  Not saying they aren't good, but, in hindsight you are shooting to appease an instructor and meet criteria for what they expect, but really your portfolio needs to be what you want to appease your prospective clientele and suit your tastes, not a teacher...  By all means do what you have to do to get great grades and advance in school, but from a person who has been in your shoes, While shooting for assignments, shoot an entirely different but related shoot (same model, location, etc), but do it for you... arrange lights the way you like them, tinker, experiment, fine what suits your tastes and find your brand and your look..  something where someone would want to hire you over uncle bob, shoot the heck out of those scenes, post those to your site.   

Brooks -2004

You are totally right, I definitely have to try to find my own look and I definitely plan to shoot more so i can build up my website. As of now I dont have a tone of work, so I am very limited to what i can choose to put in my site. I have been constantly acquiring new skills and knowledge, so whenever y look back at my photos y see a lot of things i would do differently... specially on portraiture and Studio work... the website has only been up for a day... i consider this to be the beginning of many more great things to come ;) I put the website together so that i dont have to direct people to a flickr page and to have a page that is mine and i can have my pictures the way I want to. I know its not perfect, its going to take a lot of time and work to keep building my portfolio to a more professional level, but i look forward to it.

PS. I study at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale

Canon 5D Mark III & Canon EOS M
100mm Macro F2.8L, 70-200mm F2.8L IS II, 24-70 F2.8L II, Canon 100-400L, Canon 16-35 F2.8 L II, TC 1.4X, TC 2X

awinphoto

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2012, 11:40:19 AM »
Looks like a good first whack on posing...  If you have the time, today and or tonight, creativelive.com is having a free webinar/seminar that should be looping through the night with a very good posing/glamour photographer...  perhaps you can take a peek and learn a bit as far as hands, etc...  Different people will give different suggestions... some will say "tummy away from the light for more slimming poses", which you did, however other will say to use short lighting (you did broad lighting on the face) gives more flattering facial portraits...  Also, the lighting technique you used was a semi rembrandt (triangle under the far side cheek)... While executed good, it doesn't quite do her justice...  It's generally seen as a harder, more serious and stand-offish setup... It's good if you want to convey that message, but otherwise...  The dark outfit slims her but also loses any shape in her figure which doesn't help either.  For my suggestions is for my own personal taste so take it with a pinch of salt...   If you want to keep lighting where it is, add a second fill light or bring your reflector camera right closer to outside frame to reduce the contrast in the rembrandt.  I would move the light more camera axis but slight off camera left giveing a mix of hollywood/butterfly lighting, but add refector below camera view filling shadows under nose and reducing contrast...  If light spills on the background, move subject forward or background back to create separation...  a longer lens then can be used...   Have her hand instead of resting on her hip, have is snake behind the small of her back which will hide the hand but also add curvature to back waist line and chest line...  curvature overall looks best for women...  If you want to keep it super low key the figure would look black vs a dark brown background which would give some hint to her figure... but to take it to the next level, add a kicker light 130 degrees camera right (or super big reflector if you have no more lights) that just lights her back... feel free to add flags or whatever so the light just hits her back but doesn't cause flare in the lens or spill on the front of her body....  This light will give just a glimmer of light accenting her body off and away from the background.  This shows her shape even more.  You can even ask her to kick out her hip slightly camera right and have her arm on that side lay against her hip giving more view of the curves...  Just some hints on where to go from here....  Very good start and with a few refinements you can become very very good.

thank you for your feedback and for giving me that link on creative live.com. I watched a lot of it and i leaned a couple tricks and techniques that I'm sure will be helpful in the future.

I'm glad you were able to catch the creativelive link...  also remember creativelive has new presenters every week seemingly and they are all free (while live)...  Looked at your website...  nice work..  I like your product work, very clean and simple.  Keep working with you portraits... I think you have a good eye but need to refine it a bit here and there to get exceptional.

Thank you so much! I know i need to build up my portfolio more. Specially for portraiture, its always been harder for me to photograph people, so I didnt do it as often. Now that I started my portraiture class I'm doing it more often and I should should be getting better portraits that i cant post in my site... Most of the ones I have were from a while ago and i didnt know the things I know now, just gotta get out there, shot more, and keep practicing

What school are you attending?  To be honest, i'm just like you where portraiture hasn't been my strong suit, but as the economy changes and the current situation we are in with companies cutting advertising budgets and such trying to keep in the black, we have been doing more portraiture and so I've been refining and restructuring my business to accommodate...   While I was at school, i would have thought it would be silly, but I would hesitate putting class assignments and such in your portfolio...  Not saying they aren't good, but, in hindsight you are shooting to appease an instructor and meet criteria for what they expect, but really your portfolio needs to be what you want to appease your prospective clientele and suit your tastes, not a teacher...  By all means do what you have to do to get great grades and advance in school, but from a person who has been in your shoes, While shooting for assignments, shoot an entirely different but related shoot (same model, location, etc), but do it for you... arrange lights the way you like them, tinker, experiment, fine what suits your tastes and find your brand and your look..  something where someone would want to hire you over uncle bob, shoot the heck out of those scenes, post those to your site.   

Brooks -2004

You are totally right, I definitely have to try to find my own look and I definitely plan to shoot more so i can build up my website. As of now I dont have a tone of work, so I am very limited to what i can choose to put in my site. I have been constantly acquiring new skills and knowledge, so whenever y look back at my photos y see a lot of things i would do differently... specially on portraiture and Studio work... the website has only been up for a day... i consider this to be the beginning of many more great things to come ;) I put the website together so that i dont have to direct people to a flickr page and to have a page that is mine and i can have my pictures the way I want to. I know its not perfect, its going to take a lot of time and work to keep building my portfolio to a more professional level, but i look forward to it.

PS. I study at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale

Cool... I've known a few people who went to the art institute but from other cities.  I cant speak about your school per se, but with my school, they had model books where prospective models wanting photos for their portfolio would put their info and pic in these books and we would use them for our assignments, most of the time free of charge for exchange of prints after the shoot.  Does your school have anything like that?  That could be a good place to start...  Pro models or up and coming models may be very easy to pose and get the look you are looking for, and generally know how to get in "that pose" that you are looking to get more than friends and or other students.  Or if all else fails you can try posting an ad on Craigslist for a model search and be open and forthcoming and explain you are a student and i'm sure there would be lots of people wanting free photos and such and that could help you get more practice in and develop your look.  I think you've got a nice collection of photos on your website...  I've been meaning to update my website but with work being the way it has been, honestly i'm lucky to update my business's facebook page let alone website..  Feel free to drop me a line as you get more photos and if you have questions or such...  I would love to see how your work progresses.   :D
Canon 5d III, Canon 24-105L, Canon 17-40L, Canon 70-200 F4L, Canon 100L 2.8, Canon 85 1.8, 430EX 2's and a lot of bumps along the road to get to where I am.

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Re: Low Key Portrait - 5D III & 100L
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2012, 11:40:19 AM »