Archive for: cinema eos

Canon EOS C500 Cinema Camera Firmware v1.0.4.1.00 Now Available

Canon EOS C500 Cinema Camera Firmware v1.0.4.1.00 Now Available

Canon has released a firmware update for the EOS C500/C500 PL Cinema EOS Cameras.

EOS C500 Cinema EOS Camera & EOS C500PL Cinema EOS Camera

  1. When using the Magnify focus assist function, the ability to move the magnified viewing area around the LCD has been added.
  2. Maximum ISO setting has been increased to ISO 80,000.
  3. Cinema Gamut mode and DCI-P3+ mode have been added to provide expanded color gamut options in RAW capture.
  4. 4096×1080-pixel RAW format resolution has been added.
  5. A Key Lock menu setting has been added which now makes it possible to lock all operations, including the START/STOP button.
  6. Using the optional Canon WFT-E6 Wireless File Transmitter, the camera’s remote-control application allows up to two users to access the same unit via a Wi-Fi link providing simultaneous and independent control of camera operation and metadata input.
  7. Canon Log LUT support has been made possible for HD/SD SDI terminal output.
  8. ACESproxy output from monitor terminal has been added.
  9. [ND]/[ND-] have been added as functions that can be allocated to any assignable button.

EOS C500 Digital Cinema Camera only

  1. Ability to assign the two control dials (body and grip) to operate either Iris or ISO sensitivity independently has been added.
  2. Peripheral Illumination Correction Data has been added for seven (7) Canon Cinema lenses (EF mount) and eleven (11) Canon EF Lenses.

Cinema lenses (EF-mount) and Canon EF Lenses which benefit from the new firmware update:

The seven (7) supported Canon Cinema Lenses (EF-mount) are:

  • CN-E15.5-47mm T2.8 L S
  • CN-E30-105mm T2.8 L S
  • CN-E14mm T3.1 L F
  • CN-E24mm T1.5 L F
  • CN-E50mm T1.3 L F
  • CN-E85mm T1.3 L F
  • CN-E135mm T2.2 L F

Please note this firmware version does not include the CN-E35mm T1.5 L F.

The eleven (11) supported Canon EF Lenses are:

  • EF-S18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
  • EF500mm f/4L IS II USM
  • EF600mm f/4L IS II USM
  • EF28mm f/2.8 IS USM
  • EF24mm f/2.8 IS USM
  • EF40mm f/2.8 STM
  • EF24-70mm f/4L IS USM
  • EF35mm f/2 IS USM
  • EF-S18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM
  • EF24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
  • EF200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x

Firmware Version 1.0.4.1.00 is for Cinema EOS C500 and EOS C500 PL cameras with Firmware Version 1.0.0.1.00 through 1.0.3.100. If your camera’s firmware is already Version 1.0.4.1.00, it is not necessary to update the firmware. Once the camera is updated to the latest firmware version, it cannot be restored to a previous version.

Download:
Download Firmware Version 1.0.4.1.00 for EOS C500.
Download Firmware Version 1.0.4.1.00 for EOS C500 PL.

The Instruction Manual provides more information on the new features and benefits available in this firmware update.
Download the new version of the Instruction Manual for the EOS C500.
Download the new version of the Instruction Manual for the EOS C500 PL.

Two Lenses Coming for CP+? [CR2]

Two Lenses Coming for CP+? [CR2]

CP+ 2014 Camera & Photo Imaging Show
We’re told that Canon could possibly announce and show two new lenses at the CP+ 2014 show in Tokyo, Japan. The show runs from February 13, 2014 until February 16, 2014.

They will not be Cinema EOS lenses. New lenses for videographers will be held for NAB 2014 in Las Vegas, along with some new Cinema EOS camera(s).

It’s speculated that one lens will be an “L” and the other a consumer non-L prime. As with all lens announcements, things are very loose and rarely have a media event attached to them.

There is also a possibility of a development announcement on a camera body we’re told.

Hope to hear more soon…

cr

Thinking Out Loud: EOS 7D Mark II Thoughts

Thinking Out Loud: EOS 7D Mark II Thoughts

A pro APS-C camera possible?
Earlier today we posted that there would be no Canon EOS 7D Mark II, we also have noticed this has appeared in a few other places on the web.

This got me thinking today whether or not it was possible that Canon would abandon this segment of the APS-C camera lineup. I came to the conclusion that they will not. It would simple not be a smart decision, however there could still be some truth to the “no 7D Mark II” statements passed around today.

What I do think is a possibility is that the camera will not be called the 7D Mark II, and be called something else. We have previously been told that a successor would have new and innovative video features. Perhaps we’re going to see something along the lines of an EOS 7D C? Canon is fully behind Cinema EOS and will continue to develop that product line.

The other possibility is perhaps Canon just doesn’t like the “7D” name and will simply rename it.

I, and others think Nikon will be releasing a replacement to the D300s and it only makes sense that Canon would do the same and replace the 7D. It’s possible that Canon is waiting for Nikon to play their hand first.

I’m looking forward to finding out what Canon has planned in 2014…..

cr

Canon’s Cinema EOS System Captures Comet ISON from Space

Canon’s Cinema EOS System Captures Comet ISON from Space

TOKYO, Japan, December 2, 2013—Canon Inc. announced today that an ultra-high-sensitivity 4K camera was used to successfully capture video of the comet ISON from the International Space Station at approximately 7:08 p.m. JST on November 23, 2013. Canon technology contributed to this world’s-first achievement as video production equipment from Canon’s Cinema EOS System was used to record the astronomical phenomenon.

Discovered in September 2012, ISON was unique in that, among the many large comets that have passed through the solar system in recent years, none had traveled so close to the sun. Accordingly, expectations were high that the “sungrazing” ISON would provide earthbound stargazers with a rare performance that would not likely be repeated anytime soon. After the video was shot, however, the comet is believed to have largely broken up and evaporated, meaning that it will no longer be visible in the night sky.

The footage of the comet ISON was shot from the vantage point of outer space, which is not subject to atmospheric fluctuation, enabling the capture of clear video images that would not have been possible if shot from Earth. As a result, the video will likely prove of high value to the scientific community.

The Canon video production equipment taken on the mission, all from the company’s Cinema EOS System lineup of professional digital cinematography products, comprised the EOS C500 PL professional cinema camera (launched in October 2012) and two EF Cinema Lenses: the CN-E15.5-47mm T2.8 L SP (launched in December 2012) and the CN-E30-105mm T2.8 L SP (launched in October 2012). All three support 4K image resolution and the EOS C500 PL makes possible exceptional high-sensitivity imaging performance that facilitates the capture of usable footage even in low-light conditions.

The actual EOS C500 PL used on board the International Space Station underwent special modifications to further boost sensitivity and to enable the camera to withstand the rigors of shooting in space.

Just Touching the Surface of Dual Pixel Technology? [CR1]

Just Touching the Surface of Dual Pixel Technology? [CR1]

Dual Pixel technology more than just AF?
NL reports that they’ve been told to expect even more new features from Canon’s Dual Pixel technology other than autofocus. Currently the tech appears in the EOS 70D and will also appear in an upgraded EOS C100. Will the C300 get a similar upgrade?

Apparently dual pixel design will need the latest generation of processing (DIGIC 6/7?) technology to realize its full potential. The benefits of this alongside new CODECS will be seen in the next Cinema EOS cameras and possibly in new high end DSLRs.

The video and stills segments of the professional lineup will get upgrades in 2014. Cinema EOS will get it first, and possibly be shown in April at NAB 2014 in Las Vegas. DSLRs will get it in the second half of the year and will most likely be shown at Photokina 2014 in Cologne, Germany.

Source: [NL]

cr

From InterBEE: Interview With the Head of Cinema EOS

Newsshooter talks C100 Dual Pixel CMOS AF with Canon’s Mr Onda
Dan Cheung sits down with the head of Canon’s Cinema EOS product line to talk about the C100 dual pixel CMOS AF upgrade that was recently announced.

Mr Onda clarifies that the update to the Cinema EOS C100 is firmware and a “service adjustment”, as it and the EOS C300 already have Dual Pixel CMOS AF capabilities at the hardware level.

They also talk about lenses and RAW video and why they think the “lower range” cameras don’t need the RAW video capabilities that the C500 has. It’s also fun to watch Mr Onda discuss Magic Lantern and the actual hardware capabilities of their cameras like the EOS 5D Mark III.

An interesting point is Mr Onda says they plan to introduce STM technology into “L” lenses. Although he mentions that developing an L lens takes a lot longer to do than the current STM lenses.

Source: [Teradek]

cr

The Blackmagic Production Camera 4K

The Blackmagic Production Camera 4K

An EF mount 4K cinema camera
For the second year in a row, the biggest buzz from the show has come from Blackmagic Design (you’re a close second Freefly).

Last year they launched a 2.5K cinema camera that has been plagued with availability issues. People that have got their hands on one seem to genuinely like the camera. Although there are still a lot of people that have been frustrated by their inability to get one.

This year Blackmagic Design launched two new cameras, a compact cinema camera for $995 and the very exciting 4K camera for under $4000. The camera itself has a Super 35 sensor and has a global shutter, which eliminates the rolling shutter frustration.

From Blackmagic Design
“Shoot Ultra HD TV or 4K feature films with the new Blackmagic Production Camera 4K. You get a large Super 35 size sensor with professional global shutter combined with precision EF mount optics, high quality visually lossless compressed CinemaDNG RAW and Apple ProRes 422 (HQ)™ file recording for a complete self contained solution. The built in touchscreen lets you monitor, change settings and enter metadata directly on the camera!”

I spent a half an hour or so with Blackmagic Design along with my friend Mitch from Planet5D. It was a good talk and has changed my view of Blackmagic Design and how successful I think they can be.

First up, the production issues of the first camera. The company feels those are behind them, they’ve learned a lot from the issues. The first camera had issues with sensor production, one of the only a handful of parts inside the camera that Blackmagic Design doesn’t manufacture themselves. For the last year, they have had an abundance of camera bodies without sensors inside them. The new sensor comes from a new supplier and they’ve made sure they are going to be able to meet demand. Blackmagic Design wouldn’t tell us who that manufacturer was at the time of writing this, as they don’t feel it matters to consumers where the sensor comes from. As long as they can produce them, and the camera gives good results, who cares? I agree with that point, but I do appreciate the passion of camera lovers.

That being said, the speculation is the sensor is made by CMOSIS , as it shares some physical similarities to the Leica M sensor. CMOSIS also makes a Super35 sensor that is in the Apertus camera.

The camera will only be available in EF mount, as the distance to the sensor prevents a PL mount version of the camera. The image circle is also too big for Micro 4/3 lenses.

The camera is slated for release in July, so there should be decent stock of them in August if what were told today about product was true.

This may not be the only cinema camera you own, but it’s shaping up to be one a lot of people with add to the kit. At under $4000, it’s almost a no brainer. One may appear in my camera bag, so I can continue to make bad movies, but at 4K resolution!

Thanks for your time Blackmagic Design.

Visit Blackmagic Design | Preorder the Blackmagic Production Camera 4K $3995

cr

Save $1000 on the Canon EOS C100

Save $1000 on the Canon EOS C100

From B&H Photo
There is an instant savings of $1000 off the Canon EOS C100 cinema camera. The price is good until April 11, 2013.

Canon EOS C100 at B&H Photo $5499 (save $1000)

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Canon U.S.A. Announces Free Firmware And Application Software Upgrades For Select Cinema EOS System Cameras

Canon U.S.A. Announces Free Firmware And Application Software Upgrades For Select Cinema EOS System Cameras

MELVILLE, N.Y., April 3, 2013 – Canon U.S.A., Inc. a leader in digital imaging solutions, announced today new firmware and application software upgrades for the Company’s Cinema EOS System lineup of cameras. New ACES compatibility software for the Cinema EOS C500 and Cinema EOS C500 PL Digital Cameras will be available as a free download expected in June 2013. Additional Cinema EOS firmware upgrades, including a new 1,440 x 1,080 pixel recording mode at 35Mbps for the Cinema EOS C300 and Cinema EOS C300 PL Digital Cameras, are expected to be available as free downloads starting in October 2013, all from thewww.usa.canon.com.

In response to strong demand from professionals working in the fields of motion picture, commercial and television production, the firmware and application software upgrades will offer enhanced color management efficiency and camera functionality, contributing to improved video production workflow efficiency.

ACES Compatibility for Greater Production Workflow Efficiency (EOS C500/EOS C500 PL)

Cinema EOS C500 and Cinema EOS C500 PL camera users will be able to download a new version of Canon’s Cinema RAW Development Software for working with 4K RAW data. The new version provides support for the Academy Color Encoding System (ACES) color management standard, as defined by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) and standardized by the Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers (SMPTE). Compatibility with ACES helps make efficient workflows possible, enabling color management using a uniform color space – even when handling video captured using multiple cameras with different color characteristics.

Automatic Functions (EOS C300) and New Recording Mode (EOS C300/EOS C300 PL)

A new firmware upgrade for the Cinema EOS C300 Digital Camera adds Push Auto Iris and One-Shot Autofocus (AF), two outstanding automatic functions incorporated in the Cinema EOS C100 Digital Camera (released in November 2012). These functions enable users to automatically adjust lens aperture and focusing through a simple one-touch operation, which can be particularly useful for cinematographers and videographers shooting without the support of an assistant.

In addition, a firmware upgrade for the Cinema EOS C300 and Cinema EOS C300 PL Digital Cameras adds a 1,440 x 1,080 pixel recording mode at 35Mbps, a resolution widely used in terrestrial digital television broadcasting. This new mode will expand the versatility of the XF codec and can be a useful addition for broadcast applications where the reduced bandwidth requires less transmission time while still maintaining a high level of image quality.

Shifting Display Location during Magnified Focus Assist (EOS C100, EOS C300/EOS C300 PL, EOS C500/EOS C500 PL)

Firmware upgrades for the EOS C500 and EOS C500 PL, EOS C300, EOS C300 PL, and EOS C100 Digital Camera models enable the Magnified Focus Assist function’s magnified view area within the viewfinder and LCD monitor to be shifted to locations other than the center of the screen, allowing users to confirm focus across the entire display area.

About ACES

Professionals in the cinema, television and other high-quality digital production industries commonly make use of multiple cameras when shooting video. As these cameras employ different sensors, each offers varying color characteristics. In addition, users can select from a diverse range of camera settings during image capture, such as aperture, focus position, frame rate and recording format, and because of this, images shot for a single scene can produce different results in terms of color and gradation, depending on the camera used.

Furthermore, when inputting, editing and outputting video, professionals may use various displays, each with its own color space, resulting in differences in how colors appear depending on the device used, even when viewing the same footage. For example, the viewfinder of a camera used during filming, the PC display used to edit the images, and the projector or television for viewing the video each offer varying color characteristics, causing the colors in the video to appear differently.

Therefore, color management takes a great deal of time and effort to correct for camera- and display monitor-related color differences.

ACES is a color management architecture developed by AMPAS, and standardized by SMPTE, that aims to improve efficiency among complex color management workflows by delivering uniform color expression through a standardized color space used during the video production workflow. Through compatibility with ACES, video captured using different cameras and settings can be aligned with the ACES color space, which offers a wide color range and high dynamic range. ACES provides an archive-ready file format, and also delivers high workflow efficiency by allowing users to confirm images with the same appearance even when using display devices with varying color characteristics during input and output.

Canon Inc. Announces Development Of 35mm Cinema Prime Lens, Sixth In A Series Of Compact, Lightweight, Precision-Matched Lenses

MELVILLE, N.Y., April 3, 2013 – Canon Inc., the parent company of Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging solutions, has announced the development of a 35mm cinema prime lens for large-format single-sensor cameras employing Super 35mm, full-frame 35mm, and APS-C size imagers. The 35mm cinema prime lens will look to join Canon’s line of 14mm, 24mm, 50mm, 85mm, and 135mm EF-mount Cinema prime lenses. The 35mm cinema lens in development will look to become the sixth in the line, filling a strategic optical need between Canon’s 24mm and 50mm lens offerings. As with Canon’s precision-matched, competitively priced CN-E prime lenses, the 35mm lens under development will look to deliver 4K optical performance and inherit the professional operability of the existing CN-E prime lens line.

Canon Cinema prime lenses are part of the Canon Cinema EOS System of professional digital cinematography products, which also include the EOS C500 4K/2K Digital Cinema Camera, EOS C300 Digital Cinema Camera, EOS C100 Digital Video Camera, EOS-1D C 4K DSLR Cinema Camera, and four Canon Cinema zoom lenses. A development sample of the 35mm cinema lens will be on display in the Canon booth #C4325 during the 2013 NAB Show in Las Vegas, NV, April 8-11, 2013, and the lens itself is currently expected to officially launch sometime this year.

“Canon is committed to supporting cinematic culture and the continued advancement of tools for visual storytelling at all levels,” affirmed Yuichi Ishizuka, executive vice president and general manager, Imaging Technologies & Communications Group, Canon U.S.A. “During the past 18 months, Canon has brought our Cinema EOS product line to market, and in that time we have introduced HD, 2K, and 4K cameras, lenses and workflow solutions, as well as structured a comprehensive service and support network for professionals in the theatrical motion picture and television markets to enable customers to create and deliver exceptional imaging content and cinematic brilliance.”

Current Canon Cinema Lens Lineup

Each current Canon Cinema lens is equipped with an 11-blade aperture diaphragm, which is ideally suited to help achieve creative depth-of-field manipulation and pleasing “bokeh” effects. The Canon line of Cinema prime lenses is precision-matched for consistent and solid optical performance throughout the line, and the inner focus mechanism helps minimize focus-induced changes in the angle of view. All feature a full-frame image circle in a lightweight, compact design, and they incorporate proven Canon lens elements designed to fulfill contemporary 4K production standards. All Canon Cinema primes also deliver color tone and balance that matches Canon’s top-end Cinema zooms and compact Cinema zooms. Canon Cinema prime lenses deliver the operation and reliability required in professional film-style shooting environments.

All Canon Cinema prime lenses are fully compatible with the Canon EOS C500, EOS C300, EOS C100, and EOS-1D C digital cinema cameras. The EF-mount design of all Canon Cinema prime lenses provides communication with these cameras for such handy features as display of the ƒ number in the electronic viewfinder, recording of focus/zoom position and f number, and, later this year, Peripheral Light Compensationi.

Strategically integrated motion-picture style mechanical attributes (as opposed to those for still photography lenses) are also an important design feature of Canon’s series of Cinema prime lenses. These film-style characteristics include 300-degree rotation on the focus ring for precision focus control as well as large, highly visible engraved focus scales for convenient operation. These markings appear on the angled surfaces on both sides of the barrel, making them easy to read and to adjust the “stepless” focus and/or aperture settings of the lenses from behind or from either side of the camera for camera operators or focus pullers. Focus markings can be switched from standard labeling to metric, and control rings are engineered to maintain the proper amount of resistance with consistent operating torque and familiar tactile “feedback” for satisfying manual control. All of Canon’s current Cinema prime lenses also share the same uniform gear positions, diameters, and rotation angles, as well as front-lens diameters, making them compatible with a wide variety of matte boxes, follow focus gear, marking disks, and other third-party film-industry-standard accessories. Film crews can quickly change lenses without the need for accessory gear-position adjustments or other changes to the rig setup.

The versatility of image-capture options using Canon EOS digital cinema cameras can be further extended with Canon’s Cinema Zoom lenses (the CN-E14.5-60mm T2.6 wide-angle and the CN-E30-300mm T2.95-3.7 telephoto) and Compact Cinema Zoom lenses (the CN-E15.5-47mm T2.8 wide-angle and CN-E30-105mm T2.8 telephoto). All four lenses are available in both EF- and PL-mount versions, and the mount can be switched at a Canon service facility in the United States for added flexibility. Almost all of Canon’s EF Series photographic lenses can also be used with these Cinema EOS cameras, including Image Stabilized zoom, tilt-shift, and macro lenses.