Canon EOS Rumors

1D Mark IV in the Field.

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From Jeff Ascough
Jeff had a chance to take the new 1D Mark IV on location to a wedding to test the lowlight AF and higher ISO quality. I can’t think of too many people more qualified to do so. He doesn’t use a flash 99% of the time when shooting a wedding.

Check his thoughts and samples: http://jeffascough.typepad.com/….

cr

84 responses to “1D Mark IV in the Field.”

  1. Hum, OK pixel size is not directly the issue but :

    A bigger sensor receives more light for the same aperture/shutter speed.
    This is physics (actually just geometry), and causes bigger sensors to be better at high iso, all other technological tricks being equal.
    Now, cameras are bags of technical tricks…

    Also, dynamic range is the same issue as noise at base iso. So yes, larger sensors have better dynamic range (all other tricks being equal :-)

  2. “Also, dynamic range is the same issue as noise at base iso. So yes, larger sensors have better dynamic range (all other tricks being equal :-)”

    Simply not true. A quick gedankenexperiment – if you have two sensors of different size but with the same pixel size (so the only difference is pixel count) and everything else being equal – do you think that noise/dynamic range will be different? Quick answer – no. Sensor size (area) is relevant only in respect to crop factor (if any) not to IQ.

  3. I have to agree with Denni. I have a Nikon film scanner from that era that gives me 11MP files from 35mm negatives and slides.

  4. Now doesn’t that sound pretty silly. Why not just have one camera that does it all? Nikon seems to have no problem making this….

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