Canon DSLR Rumors

5 axis IBIS coming to next Canon EOS R series camera [CR2]

One of the biggest features missing from the first Canon EOS R for a lot of people is in-body image stabilization. Canon has always been a company that has said in-lens stabilization is their preferred way of doing things, as they have made claims that it’s better than sensor based stabilization.

We’ve seen enough comparisons over the years that show sensor-based systems work as well as lens-based systems in most scenarios.  There still seems to be a bit of debate when it comes to stabilizing super telephoto lenses.

We’re being told by a pretty good source that Canon will introduce 5 axis IBIS (in-body image stabilization) in the next EOS R series camera. We’re not sure how this is going to work with in-lens stabilization, but if Canon could figure out a way to make the systems work together to improve performance, that would be a big step forward.

More to come…

criscokkat

EOS 80D
Sep 26, 2017
152
111
Madison, WI
I've said it before on here:

The R series was rushed out the door. Canon puts together good products, so overall the R is a good camera. The control ring is brilliant, the feel of the camera is good, the lenses aside from the kit lens are spectacular (not that the kit lens is bad, it's just not as improved as you'd think it would be).

But the hardware driving everything is anemic, leading to video without chips fast enough to encode newer formats on the fly (leading to very watered down video), severely restrained autofocus modes when you want to take multiple shots fast, and lack of other features becoming standard in it's competition's price range like IBIS. (This feature requires processing to know how to adjust itself, and the chipset driving everything can't hump data fast enough).

I remember the rumors floating around on several sites that Canon was looking at using sony sensors in some new products. I'm actually wondering if they are considering using sony ARM chips that are used in multiple camera processing systems. These are built on smaller die technology and have faster throughput and processing. However it's just a programmable chip, which means it could still have Canon software running on them still. Both the chips canon uses now and the chips Sony makes for it's own (and other) cameras have the same reference ARM design at it's root. Sony's is just updated and on a smaller die process, which makes it faster.
 

koenkooi

EOS RP
Feb 25, 2015
203
75
I've said it before on here:

The R series was rushed out the door. Canon puts together good products, so overall the R is a good camera. The control ring is brilliant, the feel of the camera is good, the lenses aside from the kit lens are spectacular (not that the kit lens is bad, it's just not as improved as you'd think it would be).

But the hardware driving everything is anemic, leading to video without chips fast enough to encode newer formats on the fly (leading to very watered down video), severely restrained autofocus modes when you want to take multiple shots fast, and lack of other features becoming standard in it's competition's price range like IBIS. (This feature requires processing to know how to adjust itself, and the chipset driving everything can't hump data fast enough).

I remember the rumors floating around on several sites that Canon was looking at using sony sensors in some new products. I'm actually wondering if they are considering using sony ARM chips that are used in multiple camera processing systems. These are built on smaller die technology and have faster throughput and processing. However it's just a programmable chip, which means it could still have Canon software running on them still. Both the chips canon uses now and the chips Sony makes for it's own (and other) cameras have the same reference ARM design at it's root. Sony's is just updated and on a smaller die process, which makes it faster.
It's not the Arm core in an Arm chip that does the heavy lifting for camera things, that's usually done by the ISP, DSP, GPU or a combibation thereof. Don't underestimate how much work it is to make all your 'camera' software work on a completely different architected while keeping the CPU portion the same.
 

old-pr-pix

EOS RP
Dec 26, 2011
365
20
Hallelujah!

OK, though really—the latest in-lens IS has been rated to 5-stops. How many stops do we consumers suspect are possible with IBIS and ILIS combined?
That's easy... Panasonic and Olympus both rate their respective dual IS/sync IS systems at 6.5 stops. Olympus body expected in Jan. 2019 is rumored at 7.5 stops. Beyond that Olympus has (jokingly) implied that rotation of the earth must be taken into consideration. Still doesn't correct subject blur though.
 

YuengLinger

EOR R
Dec 20, 2012
2,234
252
Southeastern USA
That's easy... Panasonic and Olympus both rate their respective dual IS/sync IS systems at 6.5 stops. Olympus body expected in Jan. 2019 is rumored at 7.5 stops. Beyond that Olympus has (jokingly) implied that rotation of the earth must be taken into consideration. Still doesn't correct subject blur though.
Based on my experience, and a rudimentary understanding of what reduces and increases blur, subject blur can be reduced with lens IS in certain common scenarios. Here's one: If you are camera shaking to the left for a moment, while the subject is turning his/her face slightly to the right at the same moment, the combined movements take a faster shutter-speed to overcome blur. So if my lens is "held" steady by IS, it reduces the speed of combined motions in opposite direction.

Bottom line, for portraits and events, IS works wonders. It isn't just for still lifes.

And then there's panning mode IS which can help reduce blur at angles to the direction of subjects in motion.
 
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mk0x55

I'm New Here
Nov 16, 2018
19
3
I like the way Canon seems to go. Of course the sensors leave most to be wished for to me who shoots stills; but IBIS helps a ton for high-quality lenses that do not have lens IS (like Zeiss or Canon's 24-70).

I just hope it will be a solid design that's not prone to breaking if you happen to bang the camera mildly... (which just happens sometimes).