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Canon joins forces with the Japanese government and others for advanced chipmaking production

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Canon has partnered with Tokyo Electron and Screen Semiconductor Solutions to develop advanced chipmaking production technology with support from the Japanese government according to a report by Nikkei Asia.

The $386mil USD funding from the Japanese government is through the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, along with the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI).

Japans semiconductor production industry has lost ground in recent years to Taiwanese chipmakers and companies like Intel.

The goal is to develop and implement a 2-nanometer or smaller process for chips by the mid-2020s.

David - Sydney

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Intel struggling to get their 7nm production operating well and committing USD20b in a couple of new fabs to get down to 5nm and TSMC moving from 5 to 4 to 3 over time.... The money thrown at the Japanese fabs of 2nm in 4 years would seem to be too small and difficulties too much.
 
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usern4cr

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This is great news for Japan's R & D. It's good to hear they're not giving up and having China do their manufacturing.

If they think they can get results at 2nm for that price, I'd be willing to bet that they can pull it off within that price, with maybe some extra for unforseen issues. If Canon happens to come out with even better sensors & processors because of it, then we'll also be the beneficiaries of it. :)

Now, if only the US had the foresight to do something like this ...
 
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Mt Spokane Photography

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Canon is selling lithography equipment, its very expensive and difficult to improve so why not use someone elses money to do it.
 
Canon has zero market share in advance Lithography.
When I lived and worked in Japan (late 90’s) Canon and Nikon and even ultratech all had fair share. NEC was #2 in semiconductor revenue.
The industry has changed.
Latest immersion scanners / i193 it is mostly ASML ...with Zeiss lenses. Strong manufacturing engineering control makes them better than Canon or Nikon. For the latest technology / EUV, the 400M$ is noise....Intel alone invested 4B$ in ASML....each tool is >100M$.
Sony, Canon and to some extend Kioxia are just small niche players...this 400M$ won’t change that...
 

Berowne

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Jun 7, 2014
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Canon has zero market share in advance Lithography.
When I lived and worked in Japan (late 90’s) Canon and Nikon and even ultratech all had fair share. NEC was #2 in semiconductor revenue.
The industry has changed.
Latest immersion scanners / i193 it is mostly ASML ...with Zeiss lenses. Strong manufacturing engineering control makes them better than Canon or Nikon. For the latest technology / EUV, the 400M$ is noise....Intel alone invested 4B$ in ASML....each tool is >100M$.
Sony, Canon and to some extend Kioxia are just small niche players...this 400M$ won’t change that...

TWINSCAN NXT:2000i
 

tmroper

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Given the changing nature of China's Taiwan policy, this is a very good idea geopolitically, too. And is Sony a part of this effort, too?
 

DennisHuiberts

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Make that >150M Euro for an ASML NXE3400C (high volume manufacturing for <7nm nodes) and >225M Euro for an ASML EXE5000 (high volume manufacturing for <5nm nodes, release plan for 2023). Canon has never been a big player in the semiconductor market. Nikon did good with its ArFi systems in the past (and had a lot of patent disputes with ASML), but no other player but ASML has done better at <193nm wavelength lithography for high volume manufacturing. 4 years time frame to get to a <2nm patterning process (without an enormous amount of multi-patterning) is just wishful thinking. No matter how much the Japanese government is willing to spend.
 
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