This is an old patent application (2023-127217) that we brought to you back in September of last year. But with the upcoming Canon EOS R5 Mark II release coming shortly, I felt it was a good idea to revisit it, as it will use something very similar, if not this exact setup.

We know that the EOS R5 Mark II is coming out with vented ports for cooling and also with a cooling grip. Both of these items are described in this patent application.

The first thing that was brought up when vents were mentioned with the EOS R5 Mark II – it's very easy to create these to be entirely weather-sealed. The trick is that the airflow is contained in a sealed channel or “pipe” and heat is exchanged from the inside of the camera to the inside of the pipe. The camera is warmer than ambient air, so heat will naturally transfer. So weather sealing a camera that has a vent is not an issue.

This is the diagram with the grip attached and the general airflow is shown in blue. The port, 241, is on the bottom of the camera and connects with the grip. Air is then forced from the grip into the camera and out the side ports (242 and 243).

Looking at the bottom of the camera, you'll see that it has a rectangular intake vent. This allows the camera to align with the grip to provide an active cooling solution, but will also allow for the camera to be passively cooled without the fan as well. Since it's on the bottom of the camera, the odds of it being impeded is less than for instance, if it was around the handgrip area.

I think this also means that there's a good chance that the normal battery grip will have a slightly different design to not block the airflow.

Looking at the grip in more detail, you can see that it has an intake vent 305, and the grip pushes the air out the vent 317 and into the camera body. 318 is a seal that prevents air from escaping.

You can review the entire patent application here.

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67 comments

  1. It is good to read that it is easy to make the vents in the body weather-sealed.

    It will be interesting to see how the manufacturers of L-brackets (like RRS) will prevent their brackets from obstructing the vents in the bottom of the body and/or grip.
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  2. It is good to read that it is easy to make the vents in the body weather-sealed.

    It will be interesting to see how the manufacturers of L-brackets (like RRS) will prevent their brackets from obstructing the vents in the bottom of the body and/or grip.
    I would imagine they just will leave an angled area open so air can go into the vent.

    I wouldn't expect it to be a difficult engineering problem - but it may prevent using an R5 grip on an R5 Mark II.
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  3. The body is weather sealed. Simple. But . . . how do you clean out the grunge / fungus / mildew that will inevitably find its way into the slot? Will Canon offer a cleaning kit?
    I doubt it'll be that dramatically more difficult than cameras and systems that already have air ducts. just use a can of compressed air. since there's no fan in the camera - compressed air in the reverse direction will clean out everything.
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  4. I’m sure it can be weather sealed, but I’m definitely a bit skeptical. So when water gets into that vent and gets heated up, should I expect the camera to vent steam? I guess that’s better than having a really really hot part of the camera being in a spot one could accidentally grab, to be fair.
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  5. I’m sure it can be weather sealed, but I’m definitely a bit skeptical. So when water gets into that vent and gets heated up, should I expect the camera to vent steam? I guess that’s better than having a really really hot part of the camera being in a spot one could accidentally grab, to be fair.

    if your camera is reaching 100C to generate steam you have other more serious camera issues.

    this is really no different than your phone having a passive surface, or any other device with a passive heat sink. air flows over or around the hot surface. it allows for better optimization of the heat removal, instead of it just collecting in the camera or as bad - on the camera.
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  6. if your camera is reaching 100C to generate steam you have other more serious camera issues.
    Water vapor, aka evaporation, forms at a lot lower temperature than that.
    It happens under 100F depending on the humidity.
    A hair dryer is certainly not boiling your head.
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  7. Grunge would definitely be an issue.
    Fungus and mildew should not be much of an issue since it is vented.
    It is not an issue with the R5 C.
    I have one.

    Well, there will be screening on the vents, and wash your hands after eating some Doritos before you shoot.
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  8. I am curious, why didn\'t any camera manufacturer consider adding some sort of passive heatsink to the grip itself. Surely the total energy produced by the camera won\'t be enough to e.g. burn you, it could take advantage of the grip to passively transfer heat to your hand. Phones indirectly do that too and it\'s not a problem most of the time?
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  9. My other cameras, lenses, and electronics don't have deep open slots that go deep into the bodies. This looks a bit like a belly button situation-- open up top, closed in the bottom. It's a grunge trap I don't have on any other devices.

    The vent holes are two small ones on the side and a larger one on the bottom where the grip attaches.

    it would be difficult for it to collect a significant amount of stuff.

    laptops, for instance, have venting underside and at the back or sides, so very similar designs. Panny has a camera with the similar sort of arrangement. Tons of electronics have passive venting - with far less sealing.
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  10. I am curious, why didn\'t any camera manufacturer consider adding some sort of passive heatsink to the grip itself. Surely the total energy produced by the camera won\'t be enough to e.g. burn you, it could take advantage of the grip to passively transfer heat to your hand. Phones indirectly do that too and it\'s not a problem most of the time?

    actually more difficult. as you have to have a heat pipe or some sort of method to efficiently shunt the heat away.

    there has been patents on that though from my recollection. moving air is the easiest and most tried and true method of cooling though.
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  11. People will doubtless find reasons to believe it either doesn't work, or risks their camera in some way, regardless of reality. Like the "concerns" about robustness of adjustable screens - people perceived them as flimsy even though there was never any good evidence of it. Or the longstanding views about fixed-length versus extending lenses and dust.
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  12. The vent holes are two small ones on the side and a larger one on the bottom where the grip attaches.

    it would be difficult for it to collect a significant amount of stuff.

    laptops, for instance, have venting underside and at the back or sides, so very similar designs. Panny has a camera with the similar sort of arrangement. Tons of electronics have passive venting - with far less sealing.
    I doubt there will be any problems, but I will say that whenever I had to open up a computer (laptops included), they were furred with dust buildup. More air flowing through and more surface area, though. And the charging hole on my phone needs cleaning out occasionally - but only every year or two, and that's in my pocket half the time.
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  13. So that cooling grip has one battery, not two. But it looks like the other battery may be able to stay in the camera?

    I hope they have a separate non-cooling grip with the two batteries. I bet they'll want $1k for this cooling one.

    Brian
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  14. So that cooling grip has one battery, not two. But it looks like the other battery may be able to stay in the camera?

    I hope they have a separate non-cooling grip with the two batteries. I bet they'll want $1k for this cooling one.

    Brian
    And if the new grip can be 'stalkless', would that mean we can use 1 battery in the body and 2 in the grip? I think Fuji does something like that.
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  15. actually more difficult. as you have to have a heat pipe or some sort of method to efficiently shunt the heat away.

    there has been patents on that though from my recollection. moving air is the easiest and most tried and true method of cooling though.
    Could this cooling system potentially allow for uncropped full sensor readout OVERSAMPLED 4K at 120fps and not only oversampled 4K60p?

    8K60 is nice but oversampled 4K120p would be an even bigger achievement!
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  16. Could this cooling system potentially allow for uncropped full sensor readout OVERSAMPLED 4K at 120fps and not only oversampled 4K60p?

    8K60 is nice but oversampled 4K120p would be an even bigger achievement!

    I expect to see some "future-proof" framerates and whatnot from the camera, and some of the "cavaets" I have mentioned are probably related to the grip being attached, though I am not 100% sure of that at the moment.
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  17. I expect to see some "future-proof" framerates and whatnot from the camera, and some of the "cavaets" I have mentioned are probably related to the grip being attached, though I am not 100% sure of that at the moment.
    It'll be interesting to see how much this active cooling grip costs and weighs compared to other grips.

    I hope things like 4K120p or 8K60p would only be limited to something like 30 seconds or a minute without the active cooling grip attached and NOT completely impossible without one of these grips.

    Because this rig would surely be too heavy for my RS3 Mini gimbal with the grip attached! So HOPEFULLY "with caveats" means that the recording time is limited and not that it's entirely impossible without a grip!
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  18. I would imagine they just will leave an angled area open so air can go into the vent.

    I wouldn't expect it to be a difficult engineering problem - but it may prevent using an R5 grip on an R5 Mark II.
    It is all sort of coming together now, isn't it?

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