In this series of patent applications, Canon is looking at getting a better handle on the thermal state of the camera to be able to more effectively determine what the rise of temperature over time will be. This allows the camera to then be able to predict more accurately how much recording time, or operational time the camera has before it needs to shut down and cool off.

These patent applications seem to be based on multiple thermal sensors to determine the ambient temperature, the external housing temperature (exterior), and the internal temperatures around sensitive components. And using all these temperature sensors to determine how long the current operations and heat generation can continue.

I guess the way I see it is that if Canon is using one external temperature sensor, it's difficult to determine the ambient temperature because the camera may be hot. As heat will travel along the camera's housing and will gradually increase the temperature of the camera body. That would lead Canon to programmatically think that the outside air is hotter than it is.

They can more accurately determine ambient temperature by employing multiple sensors in various locations and then recording the temperature at the temperature sensors.

Patent Application 2024-088393

In this patent application, Canon employs multiple temperature sensors around the camera and on the exterior to be able to determine the outside air temperature and the external chassis temperature.

In the above diagram, 91 and 92 are the external temperature sensors, 93 is the temperature sensor that governs if the camera is too hot to hold for low-temperature burning, and 94 and 95 are internal temperature sensors for the processors and the sensor respectively. A combination of 91, 92, and 93 would help Canon determine the ambient temperature.

They use a combination of the 91, 92, and 93 temperature sensors to determine more accurately the case and ambient temperatures, and using that information can more reliably predict how long the camera can do its current operation.

Patent Application 2024-088394

By having multiple thermal sensors, Canon in this patent application is using all the temperature information to more accurately determine what operations can continue once the camera is in an overheated state.

Patent Application 2024-0883945

This patent application details what to show the user during operation and how to show how close the camera is to its thermal thresholds in the current operation. The graphic in the top right is a segment display, that will increase as the camera gets closer to it's operational limits.

We know the R5 Mark II is coming – and if there's one thing that Canon missed the mark on with the R5, it was thermals. It wasn't that the camera ran hot – it was the only camera that could record in 8K at the time, of course, it was going to run hot. However, it was the estimation of internal temperature increase and the ability to control the thermal thresholds in the camera. There were wild conspiracy theories that Canon was deliberately crippling the camera record times, and overall, even though the camera was ahead of its time and a technological marvel – it was let down by perception based on youtube reviews with incomplete information.

We know there is some passive venting and also an external cooling grip for the R5 Mark II so Canon is certainly taking everything far more seriously based on the blowback they got from the original R5 release.

I would suspect that the R5 Mark II will employ some aspects of the above patent applications (or all of them) to more accurately estimate ambient temperatures. I also think that Canon will do whatever is economical and possible to remove any inaccuracies in the R5 Mark II's temperature estimation.

So while these patent applications may not make it into the R5 Mark II or a future camera, I think it is very likely we'll see something like this employed in the R5 Mark II.

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5 comments

  1. But didn't some forum member state that Canon's competitor cameras never overheat?
    A useless patent? :ROFLMAO:
    No, it is the owners of Canon’s competitors camera’s that frequently overheat on internet fora ;).
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  2. But didn't some forum member state that Canon's competitor cameras never overheat?
    A useless patent? :ROFLMAO:

    There was a reason why a certain competitor had a burn warning in their instruction manual

    technically they didn't overheat, but they doubled as a bacon skillet.
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  3. There was a reason why a certain competitor had a burn warning in their instruction manual

    technically they didn't overheat, but they doubled as a bacon skillet.
    Does anyone have proper knowledge on what the ‘low temperature burns’ EU legislation is about?
    I know laptop designers are nowadays very careful to avoid making the outside hotter than 42C, but I don’t know the thresholds and if there are actual sanctions.
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  4. Does anyone have proper knowledge on what the ‘low temperature burns’ EU legislation is about?
    I know laptop designers are nowadays very careful to avoid making the outside hotter than 42C, but I don’t know the thresholds and if there are actual sanctions.

    I do remember reading about it with the R5 - and the temperature is surprisingly low. but it depends on how much you are holding onto it, and how tightly, not just temperature.

    in the case of laptops I would imagine the weight of the laptop, and heat surface on your legs. since you have far more of a grip on a camera, I would imagine the temperature threshold has to be lower than that.

    in terms of the actual EU stuff, I can't recall to be honest.
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