Forward

It seemed like a swell idea to walk down memory lane a bit and relive the 1 series from back in 2001, nearly 24 years in the making.

The 1 series has always been Canon's flagship, but its models were split at the start between full frame and APS-H. The APS-H was the faster-performing camera, as well, cheaper than the full frame cameras. APS-H defined the sensor size which was 27.9 x 18.6mm, smaller than the full-frame sensors, but larger than APS-C sensors. This ended up giving the sensor around a 1.3x crop factor. This means if you put a 400mm lens into a camera with an APS-H sensor, you'd have the effective field of view of a 520mm lens on an equivalent full-frame camera.

Canon explained the reasoning of APS-H as this was the largest sensor they could make with lithography single exposure without any stitching because the lithography machines had a maximum height and width. The full-frame sensors at the time had to be created using 3 stitched exposures to make up the entire surface area of the sensor.

In prior years, the “1D” specified the APS-H “sports” camera, while the “1Ds” specified the landscape and higher resolution variant. This continued until the 1DX which allowed Canon to put the best of both worlds into one camera, mostly because of pressure from the Nikon D3.

There may be another part to this article that delves more into the ergonomic evolution of the 1 series, but adding that into this article would make it too large to comfortably read, and there's enough to cover off here as it is.

eos1 eosr1

Table of Contents

Canon EOS-1D and Canon EOS-1Ds

On September 2001, Canon announced the EOS-1D and this marked a turning point for Canon. It was their first entirely self-developed professional digital camera within the flagship EOS-1 line. This camera bridged the gap between film cameras and digital. It had a high-resolution sensor for the time (4.1 megapixels CCD) and a magnesium alloy camera body that was based on the EOS-1V film camera body. The 1D shooting speed was, at the time, a blistering 8 frames per second.

There was nothing like it on the market, and those professionals who had temporarily moved over to Nikon because of their D1H and D1x quickly moved back to Canon upon the release of the 1D.

The EOS-1D is a superbly capable digital SLR. Not only can it deliver beautiful images with great resolution (which seems to be beyond its 4.5 megapixel count), sharpness and balanced color but it does so from what could be the most robust and best built 35mm SLR bodies ever. The eight frames per second shooting speed is truly unbelievable and in operation the 1D never fails or hesitates. Add to all of this the fact that the camera has the most flexible set of custom and personal functions of any D-SLR allowing you to make the camera 'be' whatever you need, and easily switch between personalities.

Almost exactly 1 year after the release of the 1D in September 2002 – Canon surprised the entire industry by announcing the first mass-produced full frame based DLSR. Sporting what was at the time, a crazy number of pixels (the forums were full of – why will I never need that many) at 11MP, and a 3 frames per second speed, The 1Ds was a perfect slower, yet higher resolution camera that took Nikon's D1x and D1h attempts and turned their hopes and dreams into dust.

Yes, a bit melodramatic, but at the time – a full-frame sensor was the holy grail of a digital camera. There was the Kodak DCS series of which the 560 was the largest version with 6MP. But with the release of the 1Ds, no manufacturer at the time had an answer to Canon's CMOS sensors.

The 1Ds camera body was for all ergonomic purposes the same as the 1D, allowing professionals to move between the two cameras easily.

None of these articles are complete without a Ken Rockwell review comment, and if you don’t know who Ken Rockwell is, all I have to say is that you have missed a photography site legend.

As it better be for eight grand, it's a killer camera, although with only 3FPS, 1/250 flash sync, 10 frame buffer and ISO 1,250 maximum it's still slower for sports use compared to the standard Nikon D1H. Fast enough for weddings, but I wouldn't let some bozo shoot my wedding on digital just to save him the cost of film, plus flash sync is still way too slow.

Canon EOS-1D Mark II and Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II

The 1D Mark II announced in January 2004 and its successor, the 1D Mark IIN announced in August 2005 were Canon's flagships for action and sports photographers. They both boasted an 8.2-megapixel APS-H CMOS sensor. While the megapixel count might seem modest by today's standards, the focus was on speed. These cameras offered a blazing-fast 8.5 frames per second continuous shooting rate, impressive autofocus with 45 focus points, and a top shutter speed of 1/8000th of a second, ideal for capturing fleeting moments in sports or wildlife photography.  It seems rather slow by today’s standards but back then, it was the fastest camera in the market.

The reviews of the 1D Mark II camera were all positive, one had this to say about the 1D Mark II’s image quality.

The clean high ISO results are what impress me the most with 1D II. Pictures are nearly noise-free up through ISO 400, ISO 800 is very good and ISO 1600 is very useable (and I consider myself very particular in regard to this). Basically, the 1D II is excellent for low light photography.

The 1D Mark IIN fixed some small shortcomings of the Mark II and improved the rear LCD panel to a “massive” 2.5-inch rear LCD.

For photographers prioritizing image quality over sheer speed, the 1Ds Mark II announced in September 2004 was the undisputed champion. It housed a full-frame 16.7-megapixel CMOS sensor, the highest resolution available in a 35mm format DSLR at the time. This sensor captured great detail and offered excellent low-light performance.

The 1Ds Mark II had a slower continuous shooting rate of 4.5 frames per second than it’s brother the 1D Mark II making it less ideal for action. However, the superior image quality outweighed these limitations for photographers seeking maximum resolution and detail.

One review had this amusing section in its review about the camera.  I believe that this sums up the 1 series in general, and it's a great quote.

The1Ds Mark II is not like your everyday D-SLR when it comes to price; it retails for U.S. $8,000. Secondly, it’s about as full-featured a camera as anyone has ever marketed. Thirdly, if you’re ever charged by a Rhino, use the1Ds Mark II to smack him on the head. The Rhino will likely be stunned, while the1Ds Mark II won’t be.

Canon EOS-1D Mark III and Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III

In February and August 2007, Canon announced the EOS-1D Mark III and the EOS-1Ds Mark III respectively. Both cameras catered to working professional photographers but shared an autofocus controversy.

The 1D Mark III embodied action photography. It boasted a 10.1-megapixel APS-H CMOS sensor. It allowed for a blazing-fast 10 frames per second continuous shooting rate. The 1D Mark III also sported a newly designed 45-point high-density autofocus system, designed to track fast-moving subjects with precision, at least, that’s what Canon wanted anyway.

The 1Ds Mark III was a step forward in the MegaPixel race as a landscape and portrait photographer's dream. It had a full-frame 21.1-megapixel CMOS sensor, delivering great detail and low-noise images. The autofocus system, though boasting 45 points, focused on accuracy over speed, prioritizing critical sharpness for static subjects.

It is undeniably impressive, and though it appears on the surface to be a fairly low key update to the Mark II, the more you use it the more you realize how all the little improvements add up to a significantly better camera (and that's aside from the resolution hike). Nikon's D3, launched almost simultaneously to rapturous response might stole a little of the Mark III's thunder, but the truth is that in many respects it is the Canon flagship model that most deserves to sit at the very top of the digital SLR tree.

The Mark III Autofocus Controversy

Despite their strengths, both cameras faced criticism regarding their autofocus performance. While the 1D Mark III's system was fast, some users reported inconsistencies in tracking accuracy. The 1Ds Mark III, with its focus on precision, was deemed sluggish by some action photographers. This sparked debate, with some attributing the issue to the camera bodies and others to specific lenses or user techniques.  The internet for a period of 18 months was filled with sample photos of people running toward the cameras and burst images taken to determine the success rate.

The photographer who first brought significant attention to the autofocus issues with the Canon EOS-1D Mark III is widely credited to be Rob Galbraith.

Galbraith is a respected professional photographer and in 2007, he published reports detailing his experiences with the 1D Mark III's AF inconsistencies, particularly under warm and bright conditions where autofocus typically performs well.

His detailed reports, along with user discussions on online forums, fueled the autofocus controversy surrounding the 1D Mark III. While some users might have reported autofocus issues earlier, Rob Galbraith's prominent online presence and thorough documentation likely sparked widespread discussion and debate and finally got Canon moving forward on resolving the issues.

While his website and articles are down, you can still see them here.

Rob had issues from testing the preproduction cameras and also when he received production versions, the problems still existed.

After that, [autofocus in] our preproduction EOS-1D Mark III is a mess. It can't hold focus on static subjects very well and it can't track moving subjects very well. While Canon didn't provide any details about the autofocus limitations we would encounter in the preproduction body, we hope this is what they were referring to and this is what engineers have been solving since.

I always thought this issue had to do with the arrangement of low-precision (f5.6) and high-precision (f2.8) AF points on the sensor.   As a subject would track across the AF points, tracking across from a high precision (f2.8 sensor) to a low precision (f5.6) would interrupt Canon’s carefully adjusted predictive autofocus algorithms.  You must remember these AF sensors had to predict where the subject would be in focus after the mirror flipped up.  As the mirror assembly had to be out of the way of the image sensor – so any predictive miscalculation would result in a missed focus.

While I was never proven right (or wrong!), it’s curious that when the 1D Mark IV came out – it had an entirely redesigned AF system without the precision pairs alternating like the 1D Mark III.  Canon however, even though they tried to fix this problem in firmware, the 1D Mark III and the 1Ds Mark III were forever plagued with issues. 

The 1D Mark III and 1D Mark IV sensors are shown below side by side as a comparison.

Canon EOS-1D Mark IV

This was the last of an era on the 1D series, as Canon quickly decided it was time to move on from the 1D Mark III after multiple recalls and multiple firmware fixes and none of them fully satisfactory.

Canon's EOS-1D Mark IV, announced in October 2009, was a professional-grade DSLR aimed at photojournalists, sports photographers, and anyone needing a camera built for speed and durability. While not the highest-megapixel monster on the market, it offered a compelling combination of features and performance.  It also, for the first time in a 1 series camera was able to record video.

The 1D Mark IV sported a 16.1-megapixel APS-H CMOS sensor.  However, Canon was facing strong opposition from Nikon at this time, with the Nikon D3 and D3x proving that it’s possible to have fast full frame sensors for sports applications, so while the 1D Mark IV was a very capable camera, Canon was well on the way to tackling the upstart Nikon competition with the next camera.

Canon's 1D Mark IV came a little early in its development cycle with two major improvements, along with a resolution increase. Movie mode was important to compete with the Nikon D3S, giving Canon professional photographers the ability to shoot video, when necessary, as well as stills. And a new approach to the 1D Mark IV's autofocus system was required to address the extreme difficulties many sports photographers had with the 1D Mark III's AF system. Of course, adding the 16-megapixel sensor allows the 1D Mark IV to keep up with the semi-pro and consumer cameras below, while offering improved high-ISO performance.

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Purchase used from KEH
Canon EOS-1D Mark IV

Canon EOS-1DX

Canon's EOS-1D X, announced in October 2011, marked a significant shift for Canon’s flagship 1 series DSLR. It was the first 1D series camera to boast a full-frame sensor, offering photographers superior low-light performance and wider dynamic range compared to previous APS-H models.

The 1D X housed a powerful 18.1-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor and delivered sharp, high-quality images with excellent noise control, even at high ISO settings. The camera impressed with its 12 frames per second continuous shooting rate and a 61-point autofocus system, making it excellent for action and sports photography.

Built for professional use, the 1D X featured a weather-sealed magnesium alloy body, a durable 400,000-cycle shutter, and a bright optical viewfinder. It also offered a 3.2-inch high-resolution LCD screen and, for the first time in the 1D series, built-in Wi-Fi for easier image sharing and remote control.

Cameras at this level have extremely high standards to live up to and the 1D X certainly meets them and in places even exceeds them. The new sensor is extremely impressive in terms of detail but more so in terms of its noise performance in low light. This is the finest Canon DSLR I have tested and though the difference may not be enough to tempt many Nikon users, it represents another step forward in the sports and action market.

idrA0yMZl7

Purchase used from KEH
Canon EOS-1DX

Canon EOS-1DC

The Canon EOS-1D C is a digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera designed with videography in mind. It was announced in April 2012 and was marketed towards professionals in the motion picture and television industries. It was the world's first 4K resolution DSLR camera.

The EOS-1D C used the same 18.1-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor as the 1DX, but it utilizes a cropped APS-H format for 4K video recording at 24 frames per second. This allows for high-quality video capture without needing an external recorder. The camera also offers Full HD video recording at up to 60 frames per second.

One of the EOS-1D C's strengths was its versatility. It was used for professional videography, but it also held its own in stills photography. It shared many features with the Canon EOS-1D X. This overlap made the EOS-1D C an attractive option for creative professionals who need a camera that excels in both video and photo capture.

But, the price.  Canon initally announced the MSRP of $15,000 for the 1DC. But after it started shipping in March 2013, the price started to decline rapidly.  By around Feburary 2015, not even 2 years after general release the price had already fallen to $7999.  A drop unheard of for Canon's 1 series camera bodies.

idrA0yMZl7

Purchase used from KEH
Canon EOS-1D C

Canon EOS-1DX Mark II

The Canon EOS-1D X Mark II, announced in Feburary 2016, built upon the success of its predecessor, the 1D X. It retained the full-frame format but upgraded the sensor to a 20.2-megapixel CMOS paired with the DIGIC 6+ image processor. This resulted in even better image quality with improved noise control and dynamic range for capturing low-light shots.

The performance from the 1DX received a significant boost. The 1D X Mark II boasted a blazing-fast 14 frames per second continuous shooting rate with a deep buffer, allowing photographers to capture bursts of action without missing a moment. The autofocus system also saw an upgrade, featuring 61 high-density autofocus points, all capable of cross-type focusing for enhanced accuracy in various lighting conditions.

Notably, video capabilities significantly improved with 4K video recording at 60 frames per second, making it a more compelling option for multimedia professionals.

The 1D X Mark II is directly targeted at professional use where speed, reliability and bringing home the best possible image are important. This use includes sports, wildlife, fast action, reportage, weddings, events, media and wire service use in the toughest environments. If getting the shot matters, this is the camera I want in my hands. That this camera is so fun to use makes getting that all-important shot a great all-around experience.

idrA0yMZl7

Purchase used from KEH
Canon EOS-1DX Mark II

Canon EOS-1DX Mark III

The Canon EOS-1D X Mark III, announced in October 2019, marked a notable evolution in the 1D series, building upon the strengths of its predecessors.

The 1D X Mark III retained the full-frame format but upgraded the sensor to a high-resolution 20.1-megapixel CMOS with improved low-light performance. The DIGIC X image processor delivered great image quality with excellent noise reduction and dynamic range, allowing photographers to capture sharp and detailed images even in challenging lighting conditions.

This camera truly shined in its speed capabilities. It boasted 16 frames per second continuous shooting rate with a deep buffer, ideal for capturing bursts of action without missing a moment. The autofocus system also received a significant upgrade, featuring 191 high-density AF points, all capable of cross-type focusing for superior accuracy and subject tracking in various lighting scenarios. Additionally, the improved subject recognition with deep learning helped the camera lock onto and maintain focus on fast-moving subjects with greater precision.

It also made significant strides in the video department, catering to the growing demand for high-quality hybrid shooting. The camera boasted impressive 5.5K RAW video recording at 60 frames per second, offering professional videographers and photographers who create both stills and videos exceptional detail and creative flexibility.

I've now spent some time with the 1Dx Mark III, from a Canon field test in Spain to my own independent tests with a final production model later, and what I’ve seen so far is very impressive. Canon’s packed in a wealth of important upgrades crucially without getting in the way of the handling experience that pros have become familiar with. Owners of previous models can pick up the Mark III and just start shooting without skipping a beat. Of the new features, I was fascinated using an imaging sensor for viewfinder autofocus duties. It makes a lot of sense and driven by Deep Learning it did a great job at recognizing and tracking people in often complex scenes. Coupled with the faster burst speeds, DIGIC X processing and swift card writing, this is a camera that effortlessly handles action at the highest level - as it should. I was also fond of the new Smart Controller which quickly allows you to reposition the AF area, and it’s a relief to finally find a camera company offer an alternative to JPEG for compressed images, with the HEIF format having a lot of potential. In terms of video, the 1Dx Mark III also becomes Canon's most capable model below the Cinema series, making it an extremely flexible camera for stills and movies. Arguably the most controversial aspect is that it’s still a traditional DSLR, but Canon firmly believes this is still its best technology for the very specific requirements of demanding pro sports photographers.

idrA0yMZl7

Purchase used from KEH
Canon EOS-1DX Mark III

Honorary Mention: Canon EOS-R3

I wasn't going to include the EOS R3 because I really didn't think that Canon intended this camera to be a 1 series camera. But it shares the DNA of the 1 series, and I imagine that the EOS R1 will build upon the feature sets and capability of the EOS R3.

The Canon EOS R3 is a full-frame RF-mount mirrorless camera designed for professional photographers, announced in April 2021. It boasted a brand new, Canon-developed stacked 24 Megapixel CMOS sensor with a back-illuminated design. This translates to advantages like faster readout speeds and reduced rolling shutter distortion during electronic shutter operation. This was a landmark first for Canon; they had never created a BSI or a stacked sensor before. Canon leaped 2 or even up to 5 generations of sensor designs in a single camera release.

The EOS R3 is equipped with a powerful autofocus system that utilizes deep learning technology. It can continuously shoot stills at up to 30 frames per second with full autofocus and auto exposure. Additionally, it offers 6K RAW and 4K video recording capabilities.

We're going to do a full circle and get a quote from Ken Rockwell, who after all these years is still going strong.

The EOS R3 is for full-time shooters who shoot sports, news and action all day, every day. It's a smaller, lighter, faster version of the 1DX Mark III. The R3 is for things that move, move fast, and everyone loves the mind-controlled autofocus and magic linear thumb controllers even for things that hold still.

For things that hold still, nature, architecture, astronomy or anything shot from a tripod, the EOS R5 has more resolution and costs and weighs much less. Even though the R5 lacks mind-controlled AF and magic finger controllers, the EOS R5 is no slouch, shooting and tracking even animal eyes at 20 FPS all day long, but only the R3 has mind-controlled autofocus and magic sliding thumb controllers. Both have one-touch voice recorders. The R3 is for when you're shooting all day, and the R5 is for when you're spending more time carrying it than shooting.

Honorary Mention: Those that walked before

Even though this article was about the digital 1 series cameras, I felt it a fitting end to this article by paying respects to what came before and what really vaunted Canon as the top professional camera manufacturer in the world.

Before the 1 series, professional photography was all Nikon.  Canon's EOS-1 series took market by storm and ruled the professional 35mm film SLR market for years.   Canon's EF mount was a hail mary to supplant Nikon as the dominant professional camera manufacturer – and it worked, probably better than even Canon thought it would.

[E]ventually with the debut of 1989's EOS-1 at the top of its helm - was Canon's first professional grade SLR SLR camera that has did what all the manual focus Canon F-Series models failed to do - snatch the lead from Nikon in the professional 35mm SLR camera users market; The direct comparing Nikon F4, although sold very well in numbers during the first few years when Canon switched to development of the EOS system, but soon found its conventional camera driven AF system was far behind to the superiority of the EOS system offers. Canon has never looked back since.

Debuting in 1989, the EOS-1 wasn't just another camera; it was a revolution. At its core was a brand new autofocus system, a significant leap forward from previous models. This system offered significantly faster and more accurate focusing, albeit with a single central focus point. The camera's robust build quality made it ideal for professionals working in demanding environments. The EOS-1 delivered a respectable 2.5 frames per second (fps), which could be boosted to a speedy 5.5 fps with an optional battery pack.

Following the success of the EOS-1, Canon released several iterations with even more impressive features. 

The 1994 EOS-1N addressed a key limitation by introducing five selectable focus points, offering photographers greater flexibility in composing their shots. While the base shooting speed remained at 2.5 fps, it maintained compatibility with the same battery pack as the EOS-1 for faster bursts when needed.  The EOS-1N had several different variants as well, such as the HS (integrated grip), DP (integrated battery pack), RS (Pellicle Mirror version).

The EOS-1V released in 2000, continued to refine autofocus technology. It was personally THE film camera I lusted over (I ended up using the EOS-3 instead).  The EOS-1V boasted a high-density 45-point system, delivering unmatched precision for critical focusing. This powerhouse also pushed the fps limit to an impressive 10 fps, making it ideal for capturing fleeting moments in fast-paced action sequences. If you were never in the film era, shooting 10fps was awe inspiring, unless you had to purchase your own film and pay for processing.  

These film cameras made almost everything possible that we enjoy today – without the success of the 1 series, the future of the EF and ultimately the RF system would have been dramatically different.

Whitepaper Resources

During all of this, I managed to find many of the older white papers on the various cameras. However, some of the whitepapers right now I can't find as of yet. That makes me a very sad panda.

So for your past viewing pleasure, here are the ones I was able to gather.

I miss these from Canon, these were the best camera nerd food available and I hope that Canon releases one or more for the R1.

If anyone still has any of the older white papers that are not listed send them my way, please.

Canon 1Ds Mark II White Paper

Canon 1D Mark IIN White Paper

Canon 1D Mark III White Paper

Canon 1D Mark IV White Paper

Canon 1DX Mark III White Paper

Of course, many thanks go to Canon's museum which keeps track of every single camera and lens that Canon has released over the years. You can access it here.

Canon Camera Museum (global.canon)

Go to discussion...

24 comments

  1. Nice read to look back at how the digital 1-series involved. If R3 gets an honourary mention, R6 should be mentioned as well, as it has 1DX2/1DX3\'s sensor.

    I wish even 1DX2 1DX3 R3 maintain the signature design from 1V/1D. The sleek is a GOAT design.
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  2. Nice read to look back at how the digital 1-series involved. If R3 gets an honourary mention, R6 should be mentioned as well, as it has 1DX2/1DX3\'s sensor.

    I wish even 1DX2 1DX3 R3 maintain the signature design from 1V/1D. The sleek is a GOAT design.

    Haha what, The R6? C'mon man. The R3 is a tank and built to (maybe near) 1 series standards. I know, I've taken it to environments an R6 would have died in (The Sony A1's that were there did, which did lead to some fun fanboy dinner conversation).

    The 1 series is the sum of all its parts. Most of which, we don't see.
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  3. Thanks for the article Richard!

    I've had a 1D X (upgrading from a 5D II - my wife told me "I'm pregnant" and I celebrated by buying the 1D X... one last hurray for a while :ROFLMAO: ) and I remenber fondly the ergonomics, the sense of indestructibility, the large viewfinder, the battery life... it served me well and without an hiccup for years.

    I do not regret selling it for a R5: the 45mp and the vastly improved AF and video functions are all worth it. I also love some of the new RF lenses. But I do miss the integrated grip and the R5 has locked up on me more times than I care to count (although the very last firmware update seems to have fixed it, fingers crossed :unsure: ).
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  4. Nice summary! Just a minor thing, the original 1D only had 4.1 MP, not 6.3. It was a great camera... it was what made me move to full digital from an EOS-3 film camera.
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  5. Nice summary! Just a minor thing, the original 1D only had 4.1 MP, not 6.3. It was a great camera... it was what made me move to full digital from an EOS-3 film camera.
    Thanks, fixed.
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  6. I'm going to disagree with your 1Ds3 date. According to DP Review, it was introduced in August 2007 although I don't recall when it shipped. It was a memorable week for me. Canon introduced the 40D and 1Ds3 on a Monday and Nikon introduced the D3 and D300 on a Thursday. Some people got the idea that both Nikons should both be purchased. I liked the idea and bought a 40D on Friday to go with my 5D. I believe that the Nikon Z-system was introduced exactly 11 years after the D3/D300, same date and same day of the week.

    The 1D3 was introduced in February 2007.
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  7. I'm going to disagree with your 1Ds3 date. According to DP Review, it was introduced in August 2007 although I don't recall when it shipped. It was a memorable week for me. Canon introduced the 40D and 1Ds3 on a Monday and Nikon introduced the D3 and D300 on a Thursday. Some people got the idea that both Nikons should both be purchased. I liked the idea and bought a 40D on Friday to go with my 5D. I believe that the Nikon Z-system was introduced exactly 11 years after the D3/D300, same date and same day of the week.

    The 1D3 was introduced in February 2007.
    and you would be correct. Feb and August were the announcement dates. I think I need to clarify between "announcement" and when Canon generally thinks these were released (which is after the announcement).

    I went through and cleaned up all the dates to be based upon announcement versus whatever the "release" date was. Thanks for the feedback.

    the 40D was awesome! i got one at launch too - but I can't remember the day of the week
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  8. This was most interesting, thanks also for mentioning the Canon Camera Museum webpage. It reminded me of the time when, as a student, I worked in a camera store, and had the pleasure to "play" with those wonderful objects of desire.
    But my first SLR was a Minolta SRT 101, because I disliked the Canon bayonet...
    Edit: I meant the old style bayonet, of course.
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  9. I've had a 1D X (upgrading from a 5D II - my wife told me "I'm pregnant" and I celebrated by buying the 1D X... one last hurray for a while :ROFLMAO: )fingers crossed :unsure:
    thank you for the kind words! and this is just next-level awesome.
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  10. okay! I added two more chapters. the 1DC (how did i forget a 15K 1 series camera body?) and a shout out to those film cameras that I personally lusted over back in film days. thanks for all the corrections and comments!
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  11. This was most interesting, thanks also for mentioning the Canon Camera Museum webpage. It reminded me of the time when, as a student, I worked in a camera store, and had the pleasure to "play" with those wonderful objects of desire.
    But my first SLR was a Minolta SRT 101, because I disliked the Canon bayonet...
    Edit: I meant the old style bayonet, of course.

    My first camera was a Minolta 2xi! After being in the Minolta camp for a few years, I started to look for a more prosumer system, which led me to Canon, and I have been here ever since.
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  12. thank you for the kind words! and this is just next-level awesome.
    Thank you too! :)
    I guess it was a bit self-centered (who me?!? ;) )
    But then my favorite model was born :love:
    _MG_3887.jpg
    Taken with the 1D X and the oldie but goldie EF 135mm f/2L (or maybe it was the EF 100mm f/2.8L macro IS? Can't remember)
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  13. Having owned and shot with most of these cameras going back 20 years, I can say without doubt the R3 is by far the best of the lot.

    Not even close. It\'s the lightest as well.
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  14. Interesting article. Still have and use my 1n. Interestingly it was able to be repaired with a new mirror electro magnet, the part sourced from Canon, 25 years after it was discontinued.
    Discussion of the early 1D series also reminded me that 24mp on FF is, to all intents and purposes, high resolution.
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  15. Thank you, Richard. A superb retrospective and an alarming recollection of monies spent. I believe that the 1D MkII is the only one of the range that I did not own (I held out for the 1D MkIIN). Like you, I had to \'make do\' with the EOS-3 which I still have, but I keep promising myself that one day I will get the EOS-1V!
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  16. I have the following white papers

    Canon-EOS-40D-White-Paper
    Canon_EOS_30D_White_Paper
    eos-r-system-white-paper
    canon_eos_r_white_paper
    Canon_Rebel_XTi_White_Paper
    EOS-1DsMkIII-Whitepaper
    EOS-1Ds-MkII-Whitepaper
    Canon_EOS_1DX_Mark_III_Still_White_Paper
    Canon_EOS_1DX_Mark_III_Video_White_Paper
    Canon_EOS_5D_White_Paper
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\EOS HD Workflow White Papers\\001_EOS-HD_Adobe
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\EOS HD Workflow White Papers\\EOS-HD_Adobe
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\EOS HD Workflow White Papers\\EOS-HD_Avid
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\EOS HD Workflow White Papers\\EOS-HD_Edius
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\EOS HD Workflow White Papers\\EOS-HD_FinalCut
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\XF Series Workflow White Papers\\XF300-305_Adobe
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\XF Series Workflow White Papers\\XF300-305_Avid
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\XF Series Workflow White Papers\\XF300-305_Edius
    Canon White Papers Beyond the Manual\\XF Series Workflow White Papers\\XF300-305_FinalCut
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