85L - UV filter vs. Clear filter

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
24,635
2,142
If you're using a dSLR, get whichever is cheaper between clear and UV - there's no difference as the sensor is insensitive to UV (if you shoot film, UV is better because film is sensitive to UV). I use B+W MRC / Nano.
 

rfdesigner

EOS 6D MK II
Sep 12, 2014
876
0
New Forest, UK
sites.google.com
It's getting a little old now, but take a look at

http://www.lenstip.com/113.1-article-UV_filters_test.html

After 6 years most manufacturers will probably have upgraded/changed their products... so treat as a theory lesson rather than a bible.

You'll notice transmission isn't a major factor in the difference between filters... AR coatings are however critical, and it's something you can check in the shop, assuming you're buying over the counter, just hold the filter up to the light and make sure there's reasonably low levels of refection.

I use cheap Hoya HMC UV(c) filters. I've only had one shot effected and that was overexposed aimd stright into a setting sun.. even then the ghost was present but only noticable if pointed out, and easily processed out.

EDIT: also take a peek at http://www.cameralabs.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=20386
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
24,635
2,142
rfdesigner said:
It's getting a little old now, but take a look at

http://www.lenstip.com/113.1-article-UV_filters_test.html

After 6 years most manufacturers will probably have upgraded/changed their products... so treat as a theory lesson rather than a bible.

You'll notice transmission isn't a major factor in the difference between filters...
For anyone looking at the Lenstip UV filter tests, like any test where a 'score' is generated, it's important to understand the factors that are used to generate that score.

For example, the B+W filter does better than the Hoya on visibile light transmission and flare, whereas the Hoya does better at blocking UV light (the latter accounts for a 5-point difference on their 40-point scale). In fact, if you look at the measured transmission curves, the reason the Hoya does better at blocking UV is that the left side of the bandpass starts at a slightly shorter wavelength - and that means the Hoya filter blocks UV better at the cost of also blocking some of the visible blue light. The Heliopan, on the other hand, is significantly worse than the Hoya in that it blocks even more of the blue light.

For the Lenstip tests, I recommend looking at the test results, not the summary table. For example, compare the top scoring Hoya with the 3rd place B+W - the Hoya scored 90% (36/40), the B+W scored 83% (33/40). But, when you look at the subscores which they provide that sum to a possible 40 pts, you see that B+W loses 1 pt for visible transmission, 1 pt for flare, and 5 pts for UV transmission. The Hoya loses 2 pts for visible transmission, 2 pts for flare, and gets 10/10 for UV transmission. But for a dSLR user, UV transmission is irrelevant...meaning that for a dSLR user, the B+W is the better filter according to Lenstip's testing, since it's better on both visible light transmission and flare...but if you look only at the summary, you'd get a different conclusion.
 

rs

EOS 6D MK II
Dec 29, 2012
1,024
0
UK
Will you ever shoot the 85L on a film camera? If not, it makes no real difference. I went for a clear filter as my EOS 1n isn't likely to make an appearance any time soon
 

rfdesigner

EOS 6D MK II
Sep 12, 2014
876
0
New Forest, UK
sites.google.com
neuroanatomist said:
rfdesigner said:
It's getting a little old now, but take a look at

http://www.lenstip.com/113.1-article-UV_filters_test.html

After 6 years most manufacturers will probably have upgraded/changed their products... so treat as a theory lesson rather than a bible.

You'll notice transmission isn't a major factor in the difference between filters...
For anyone looking at the Lenstip UV filter tests, like any test where a 'score' is generated, it's important to understand the factors that are used to generate that score.

For example, the B+W filter does better than the Hoya on visibile light transmission and flare, whereas the Hoya does better at blocking UV light (the latter accounts for a 5-point difference on their 40-point scale). In fact, if you look at the measured transmission curves, the reason the Hoya does better at blocking UV is that the left side of the bandpass starts at a slightly shorter wavelength - and that means the Hoya filter blocks UV better at the cost of also blocking some of the visible blue light. The Heliopan, on the other hand, is significantly worse than the Hoya in that it blocks even more of the blue light.

For the Lenstip tests, I recommend looking at the test results, not the summary table. For example, compare the top scoring Hoya with the 3rd place B+W - the Hoya scored 90% (36/40), the B+W scored 83% (33/40). But, when you look at the subscores which they provide that sum to a possible 40 pts, you see that B+W loses 1 pt for visible transmission, 1 pt for flare, and 5 pts for UV transmission. The Hoya loses 2 pts for visible transmission, 2 pts for flare, and gets 10/10 for UV transmission. But for a dSLR user, UV transmission is irrelevant...meaning that for a dSLR user, the B+W is the better filter according to Lenstip's testing, since it's better on both visible light transmission and flare...but if you look only at the summary, you'd get a different conclusion.
Totally agree with all the above... it's the detail rather than the conclusion that's worth reading.
 
Sep 24, 2012
60
1
www.rudoffphoto.com
In regard to the same train of questions, does anyone have experience with the new line of Hoya filters that claim to be more durable, more scratch and dust and grime resistant, etc., etc? I note these are very expensive; but so are L and Sigma lenses which are all I use. Any thoughts or experience, gratefully received.
 

geekpower

EOS 80D
Feb 22, 2015
187
0
i'm using the Hoya HD and haven't had any complaints. they have remained scratch free, even when i absent mindedly clean them with my t-shirt instead of digging through my bag for a lens pen.
 

RustyTheGeek

EOR R
Apr 27, 2011
1,634
4
54
DFW
rustythegeek.zenfolio.com
geekpower said:
i'm using the Hoya HD and haven't had any complaints. they have remained scratch free, even when i absent mindedly clean them with my t-shirt instead of digging through my bag for a lens pen.
Ditto for me. I have several of the Hoya HD+ Low Profile Threaded Super Cool CYB (Cook Your Breakfast) filters. They have held up great and don't seem to cause any issues with the image.

I use them indoor/outdoor all the time. I don't use lens caps much. I clean them with my breath and my shirt all the time. In general, I abuse the hell out of them and they keep working fine.