Adobe updates Lightroom Classic, adds a new texture slider and new Canon camera & lens support

Canon Rumors Guy

EOS 1D MK II
Jul 20, 2010
7,716
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Canada
www.canonrumors.com
New features and enhancements in the May 2019 (version 8.3) release of Lightroom Classic
Flat-Field Correction
You can now reduce shading, or lens cast, from your digital photos using the Flat-Field Correction feature. Shading can occur from a variety of different lenses and can result in both asymmetrical vignettes as well as color casts introduced by certain lens characteristics.
Flat-Field Correction is available in the Library module. To apply the correction, select all your photos in a natural interleaved order and choose Lightroom > Library > Flat-Field Correction.
For detailed information, see Flat-Field Correction.

New Texture slider
You can now smoothen or accentuate details such as skin, bark, and hair with the new Texture slider. You can adjust the Texture slider negatively to smooth skin and retain fine pore details to ensure...
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Stuart

Hi, Welcome from an ePhotozine fan, & 6D user.
Jul 22, 2010
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unfocused

EOS 5D SR
Jul 20, 2010
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Why can't people read and think before posting? Such a difficult task.

According to the stories about these warnings, Adobe is in a lawsuit with Dolby. Dolby claims unauthorized use of their product. Adobe disputes the claim.

These warnings seem to be a reasonable attempt by Adobe to warn customers that they could get swept up in the legal fight if they continue to use software that uses Dolby technology. If you have even the least bit of knowledge about the U.S. legal system, you know that lawsuits often name every conceivable party, in the hopes of pulling in deep pockets that will be held liable. In many states, liability laws allow a person to be held liable for the full amount of the award, even if they are only 1% responsible. Telling customers not to use the disputed software protects the customers. Of course, it also protects Adobe, because Adobe can show that they made a reasonable attempt to stop the use of the Dolby product.

Granted, the risk of an individual user being pulled into the lawsuit is slim. But, Adobe has thousands of customers who do have substantial resources and would be prime targets for lawsuits.
 
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Hector1970

EOS 6D MK II
Mar 22, 2012
1,093
270
I wonder did they fix anything else. I used to love Lightroom but it got extremely buggy and slow. It could do with a bit of re-engineering
I can’t understand why they don’t add a proper eraser tool ie the one in Photoshop (with content aware).
 
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unfocused

EOS 5D SR
Jul 20, 2010
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Just tried the update to Camera Raw. Seems like a significant improvement in the algorithm for the "auto" setting. Old camera raw consistently lowered contrast, a ridiculous thing to do. The new one actually seems to add a touch (5%) of contrast. My default workflow when mass editing pictures is to see what the "auto" setting does, compare to the "as shot" and then adjust from there.
 
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snappy604

EOS RP
Jan 25, 2017
257
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Why can't people read and think before posting? Such a difficult task.

According to the stories about these warnings, Adobe is in a lawsuit with Dolby. Dolby claims unauthorized use of their product. Adobe disputes the claim.

These warnings seem to be a reasonable attempt by Adobe to warn customers that they could get swept up in the legal fight if they continue to use software that uses Dolby technology. If you have even the least bit of knowledge about the U.S. legal system, you know that lawsuits often name every conceivable party, in the hopes of pulling in deep pockets that will be held liable. In many states, liability laws allow a person to be held liable for the full amount of the award, even if they are only 1% responsible. Telling customers not to use the disputed software protects the customers. Of course, it also protects Adobe, because Adobe can show that they made a reasonable attempt to stop the use of the Dolby product.

Granted, the risk of an individual user being pulled into the lawsuit is slim. But, Adobe has thousands of customers who do have substantial resources and would be prime targets for lawsuits.
aware its because of litigation with Dolby

what it highlights is how now Adobe can control what you thought was yours on your machine, and that's not a good feeling. And before people get all 'but microsoft' or any other cloud, or subscription etc.. I see this as a larger problem, not just adobe, but it re-enforces why I don't like subscription models or anything where the vendor essentially can control your purchase in the future.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,519
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aware its because of litigation with Dolby

what it highlights is how now Adobe can control what you thought was yours on your machine, and that's not a good feeling. And before people get all 'but microsoft' or any other cloud, or subscription etc.. I see this as a larger problem, not just adobe, but it re-enforces why I don't like subscription models or anything where the vendor essentially can control your purchase in the future.
Not just the subscription model, standalone users are also affected.
 
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Jethro

EOS R
Jul 14, 2018
234
111
Sounds like Texture is similar to 'Microcontrast' in DxO - which is one of the sliders I use there. Good news if I can now do it in Lightroom.
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
1,343
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what it highlights is how now Adobe can control what you thought was yours on your machine, and that's not a good feeling.
Your feeling is misplaced. It's not Adobe but some court that may decide that what you thought was yours legally belongs to Dolby.
 
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LDS

EOR R
Sep 14, 2012
1,576
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Not just the subscription model, standalone users are also affected.
Are you sure? Victoria Bampton (The Lightroom Queen) wrote "perpetual licenses are all still authorized exactly as before. This change only affects subscriptions".

I wouldn't be surprised anyway if Adobe tries to take advantage of some FUD to sell more subscriptions.
 
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Graphic.Artifacts

EOS 7D MK II
Aug 1, 2017
450
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Adobe bashing aside, Texture is a winner for me. I always found universal positive Clarity to be a bit too heavy handed and usually ended up with a setting of about -5 to -10. Texture seems to put the presence right where I want it and I've found it works pretty well all the way up to a setting of +40.

I think adobe envisions this as a tool for smoothing skin tones however and I didn't find it works well enough for that. Heavy handed and when used extensively it creates a somewhat plasticky look. OK as a quick skin smoothing tool but not something that paying clients would be happy with. A selectively used positive setting is great for bringing out hair and clothing detail so portait shooters should still get some benefit from it.

Overall though, a rare but well implemented addition to lightroom IMO so kudos to Adobe for this update.
 
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