Anyone notice a rendering problem?

JoTomOz

I'm New Here
Nov 21, 2018
16
2
#1
My eos r sometimes displays the photo with colours and detail that have bled together into uniform patches, making it look like some kind of photoshop filter that destroys detail has been used. It’s rare, but still disappointing. The first couple times (in a string of 5-8 photos) it happened I took it back to the store and they exchanged it, but it has now happened again so now am trying to figure out if this is just a problem with this camera? Happy with the camera otherwise.

Will try and attach an example later.
 
May 11, 2017
856
95
#3
My eos r sometimes displays the photo with colours and detail that have bled together into uniform patches, making it look like some kind of photoshop filter that destroys detail has been used. It’s rare, but still disappointing. The first couple times (in a string of 5-8 photos) it happened I took it back to the store and they exchanged it, but it has now happened again so now am trying to figure out if this is just a problem with this camera? Happy with the camera otherwise.

Will try and attach an example later.
Is this happening on the rear display or is this something that is showing up on the photo files?
 

Mt Spokane Photography

Spends Too Much Time on This Forum
Mar 25, 2011
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#4
I'd suspect your SD card, try a different one. Are you using a UHS II card? (It should not matter, but could be related to the type / brand of card)
 

JoTomOz

I'm New Here
Nov 21, 2018
16
2
#5
Happening on the rear display and the actual jpgs, although haven’t checked the raw files. First two times it happened on an older Sandisk class 10 card, and then on a brand new uhs-I card (Sandisk extreme).
 
Feb 1, 2016
57
15
#13
Please explain (for someone not so technically knowledgeable)
Sorry. Here's some technical junk. Read the following paragraph and if it makes no sense - don't worry, just keep reading.

One of the common adjustment tools for RAW files is a 'curves' adjustment. It's like a line running through a graph that represents the range of bright and dark pixels in your image. You can change the shape of the line (up is brighter, down is darker) and you can make curves to smoothly adjust certain pixels, of certain brightnesses, separately from others. For example, you can lower the brightness of the shadows, while raising the highlights. Anyway, if you bend the line too far, you pull the ends from the corners of the graph (where they start and are most natural for your image) and you start to loose details in portions of the image. When the curve has sharp bends, thing look bad.

Your first two example images look like they have had too much adjustment made to the highlights in the image. basically if white is the brightest (say 100%) and black the darkest (say 0%), it looks like your first two images got overly 'processed' in the brightest 25% of the range... Almost like your camera tried to brighten the pixel from 75% upward and then darken the pixels from 95% upward. If you brighten the 'prety bright' pixels more than the 'very bright' pixels - to the point where the brightest pixels look darker than the pixels that should be darker than them (pixels from 95%-100% are darker than pixels from 75%-95%) you get images that look a bit like yours.

Your third example looks messed up all over the histogram though (so I'm ignoring it) ;-)

Okay... I'll try to be clearer now :)

It's almost like your camera is over processing the RAW images when it converts to JPEG.

I haven't shot a single JPEG image in 10 years (other than on my very old cell phone). So take this with a grain of salt. But I do know the camera can be told how to process raw files. perhaps it's being told to process them in a way that is very extreme and somehow jives with your exposure settings. - That's kind of a guess... but it's an educated guess given that you've had this on two cameras.

If you have RAW files for these JPEGs, you NEED to look at the RAW files. If the RAW files are okay, you are somehow changing the internal RAW processing parameters. Theres a name for those, but I forget...

If your RAW files look like that, you live to close to a magnet factory, or area 51, or a black hole, or...
 
Likes: JoTomOz
Dec 13, 2010
3,607
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#16
Wow! Yeah that is not right at all, try to reset the camera and or change picture style mode etc to see if it’s limited to some settings. But i can’t see what would be the setting that causes this. Sorry I couldn’t be of more help.
 
Likes: JoTomOz

JoTomOz

I'm New Here
Nov 21, 2018
16
2
#17
Ah geez, checked the raw files, also doing the same thing as the JPEGs ... this is an example of exactly the kind of thing I didn’t think happen with Canons.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

Spends Too Much Time on This Forum
Mar 25, 2011
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#18
Are you using a Canon lens or 3rd party lens. This can cause issues. The latest lens firmware is also needed.

1. With SIGMA’s interchangeable lenses, the Digital Lens Optimizer located within the in-camera Lens Aberration Correction function cannot be used. Therefore, please set the Digital Lens Optimizer to [OFF] before shooting.

When the Digital Lens Optimizer is switched [OFF], but “Peripheral illumination correction”, “Chromatic aberration correction” and “Distortion correction”, located within the in-camera Lens Aberration Correction function is switched [ON], the appropriate corrections can be achieved in accordance with the optical characteristics of each lens.
 

JoTomOz

I'm New Here
Nov 21, 2018
16
2
#20
Are you using a Canon lens or 3rd party lens. This can cause issues. The latest lens firmware is also needed.

1. With SIGMA’s interchangeable lenses, the Digital Lens Optimizer located within the in-camera Lens Aberration Correction function cannot be used. Therefore, please set the Digital Lens Optimizer to [OFF] before shooting.

When the Digital Lens Optimizer is switched [OFF], but “Peripheral illumination correction”, “Chromatic aberration correction” and “Distortion correction”, located within the in-camera Lens Aberration Correction function is switched [ON], the appropriate corrections can be achieved in accordance with the optical characteristics of each lens.
Canon lenses both times. With the first copy of the camera was with the ef 40mm 2.8 (would have to check the files but cant remember what the other lens was- but was definitely canon). Second copy of the camera (and above photos) with the new rf 35mm 1.8 (which you can’t tell from the photos but is actually a great lens and fun to use).

Even with the canon lenses I thought perhaps it was the lens corrections but I thought those corrections are only made to the JPEGs? The raw files are also showing the problem.

In terms of lens firmware- for not exactly newly released ef lenses surely such a new camera has the latest?