APS-C Canon EOS R body likely [CR2]

Canon Rumors Guy

EOS-1D X Mark II
Jul 20, 2010
7,048
57
Canada
www.canonrumors.com
#1
A good source has chimed in on the possibility of a Canon EOS R body with an APS-C sensor.
In a recent interview, a Canon executive made a comment about the EOS M and EOS R systems, saying (google translated) “Since EOS R is a full-size system, it can not be downsized to EOS M size. EOS M has a role/existence value as an APS-C system.”
A few sites took that to mean that there would be no APS-C sensor equipped EOS R body. We took it to mean that they cannot shrink the RF mount and the ergonomics needed for a “prosumer/professional” camera to the EOS M size of a camera and that a compact APS-C system like the EOS M would continue to exist for the foreseeable future.

Back to the source. We’ve been told numerous times in the past and again this week that at least one APS-C equipped camera is currently being developed and tested.
Why do we believe this? The EOS 7D series of...
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YuengLinger

EOS 6D Mark II
Dec 20, 2012
2,019
64
Southeastern USA
#4
This makes so much sense in terms of moving mirrorless to the forefront, focusing resources for engineering, production, and marketing.

But where does that leave the M series? A just slightly smaller alternative? With the size and flexibility of the 80D, I've never been tempted by the M's. Speaking only for myself, of course.
 

zim

EOS 7D Mark II
Oct 18, 2011
1,863
53
#5
"Why do we believe this? The EOS 7D series of cameras. If EOS R and the RF mount as the future for Canon, which I think most people they are. There is no way that the hugely popular EOS 7D series of cameras is going to be cancelled or just remain a DSLR"

Not 'If' but 'When' The only thing that they could technically do (ignoring price) is put a crop mode into the FFs which increased FPS when engaged, I'd love that but Canon have shown no signs of going in that direction.
 

zim

EOS 7D Mark II
Oct 18, 2011
1,863
53
#7
This makes so much sense in terms of moving mirrorless to the forefront, focusing resources for engineering, production, and marketing.

But where does that leave the M series? A just slightly smaller alternative? With the size and flexibility of the 80D, I've never been tempted by the M's. Speaking only for myself, of course.
I think the M line stands on its own, small/light mass market appeal good value/quality. APS-C on the R is more about the 7D brigade, robust, weather resistant, L glass users looking for reach at a more affordable price point than FF equivalent. The possibility that some specs on say a m5II may be the same or even better on paper than an APS-C R (fps for example) doesn't mean it's a superior camera for the job. The reverse is also true and an APS-C R would not make the M line redundant.
 
Jul 31, 2018
289
106
#8
Hopefully Canon brings a really excellent "flagship M" ... EOS M5 II or "M7" soon. It should be a "mirrorfree 7D III" and a veritable Fuji XT-3/Nikon D-500 II killer ... at around 1499. EOS "R6" entry level could then come at 1699. :)

That would sort things out nicely and end all speculation regarding future:
* EOS M = APS-C (from entry level to hi-end)
* EOS R = FF sensor (with crop mode)
 

Random Orbits

EOS 6D Mark II
Mar 14, 2012
2,111
46
#9
This makes so much sense in terms of moving mirrorless to the forefront, focusing resources for engineering, production, and marketing.

But where does that leave the M series? A just slightly smaller alternative? With the size and flexibility of the 80D, I've never been tempted by the M's. Speaking only for myself, of course.
The M takes the place of the powershot series, so it can remain its own system. However, as EF transitions to R, the M series will need a few more lenses because people will not be buying EF lenses anymore, and M can not take RF lenses.

I have both FF EF and the M system. I choose the M when portability is the most important criteria (areas restricting "pro" like cameras). For everything else, its EF.
 
Likes: zim

Random Orbits

EOS 6D Mark II
Mar 14, 2012
2,111
46
#10
Hopefully Canon brings a really excellent "flagship M" ... EOS M5 II or "M7" soon. It should be a "mirrorfree 7D III" and a veritable Fuji XT-3/Nikon D-500 II killer ... at around 1499. EOS "R6" entry level could then come at 1699. :)

That would sort things out nicely and end all speculation regarding future:
* EOS M = APS-C (from entry level to hi-end)
* EOS R = FF sensor (with crop mode)
That makes no sense. Why would Canon produce a second series of "L" lenses for the M ecosystem when portability is the M's advantage. It makes for sense for a APS-C R mount. Then Canon can produce a few consumer zooms/primes for APS-C and the users that want better lenses can use RF natively.
 
Likes: zim and nchoh
Aug 15, 2017
13
5
Stockholm
#12
I have a 7D Mk II and a selection of appropriate glass for it. I would like a replacement that will allow me to use my current lenses and retains the interface features, durability, and weather-resistance of my current camera, but I would appreciate a bit more dynamic range, a touch-screen, and eye-detect AF. I sometimes miss the flippy screen from my old 70D, but I can live without that if need be. If it will be mirrorless, I will need equivalent battery life for my use cases. If that means that I need to invest in a battery grip, so be it. If that opens up the world of RF lenses, so much the better, but I am more concerned about D500 focus performance and image quality envy than I am about whether Canon's replacement for my 7D Mk II is mirrorless or not.
 
Jan 5, 2013
60
19
#14
This makes so much sense in terms of moving mirrorless to the forefront, focusing resources for engineering, production, and marketing.

But where does that leave the M series? A just slightly smaller alternative? With the size and flexibility of the 80D, I've never been tempted by the M's. Speaking only for myself, of course.
I felt the same way until I got tired of lugging my heavy 7d around while hiking the mountain trails for miles. After watching several reviews and YT videos, I decided, mostly because of its compact size and capabilities, to try an M50 and see if it might be a good fit for me. Well, I have to say, that while not a perfect camera, it's a perfect camera for the trail, lack of weather sealing not withstanding. Peak Designs Capture clip is the perfect compliment to the M50, allowing easy access to immediate photo ops, via attachment to my pack strap. An added bonus is crisp sharp photos and very usable video, both being somewhat better than what my 7D was producing for me, not to mention the fantastic small form factor, a real plus on the trail, where size and weight constraints are everything. So, as your last statement pointed out, it's all in your perspective. Like you, until I started using the M50, I had never given the M series a second glance. Now, I see why the line has such a following. It's time to now give my bruised and battered 7D a well deserved rest. While a good camera, the new EOS R is just too big for me on the trail, while carrying so much other gear.
 
Jul 12, 2013
195
27
#16
The APS-C camera with an 'R' mount...will it have its own family of lenses?

Something about this just doesn't quite seem right to me...

As I've posted previously, those who felt/hoped/believed that Canon's first full-frame mirrorless body would utilize the EF mount...I believe their thoughts were from their hearts and not their brains.

Here, too...I'm getting the same vibe.

The EF-S series of lenses (of which I own a couple)...presumably...would function on this rumored APS-C/R body only with an adapter?!

That doesn't make sense to me.

So will there be a whole new family of lenses?

A 17-55 2.8 IS ER-S?

That just doesn't make sense, at least to me.

What works, in my mind, is a bare-bones (full-frame) R mount starter camera, with the least expensive 28-70 R-mount lens that can be built.

Build it (price it right)...and they will come.
 
Likes: stevelee
Aug 21, 2015
9
3
#17
But where does that leave the M series? A just slightly smaller alternative? With the size and flexibility of the 80D, I've never been tempted by the M's. Speaking only for myself, of course.
The M series is the portable line, as a couple of manufacturers have/are doing. Sony has a clear semi-pro/pro, larger size line (a7) and an enthusiast/semi-pro portable line (aXXXX). Panasonic is basically going to follow this model with a larger FF announced and yet declaring intention to support their existing m4/3 line, among others.

The Canon M series has been extremely popular in Japan and is actually popular with certain niches elsewhere. It has a been a good development proving ground for their R system; it will continue to be used as a gateway drug for current smartphone and soccer parents, a good B-roll/back up system for pros, and a satisfying system for travelers and those seeking to downgrade to a smaller, inexpensive system with great IQ.
This is not to say this is unique to Canon. This appears to be approach by a number of companies, as stated previously.
 
Jul 10, 2013
4
0
#18
But what would the new mount be called? RF-S?
The camera would still have RF mount. As mentioned, the existing R camera already goes into crop mode when a crop lens is attached. But the lenses could be called RF-C or something (?). But who cares about the name? The important thing is that crop-sensors are significant cheaper than fullframe sensors, and that some lenses could be made lighter and more compact if designed for crop-mode on the R cameras.
I can easily imagine going APS-C mirrorless some day (I currently own a 7DII). But after the launch of the new fullframe mirrorless system from Canon, I can't ever imagine going the route of EOS-M. If I'm going to invest in mirrorless from Canon, it should be in a camera compatible with their most interesting and broad selection of lenses. That's not what the RF system is today, but that is the way I expect it to go...
 
Jul 31, 2018
289
106
#19
i don't think there will ever be R-mount crop lenses.

i'd rather expect a slightly larger, higher-end M body to succeed 7D II.
 
#20
I used the Canon M5 as my travel camera and can’t wait to see what replaces it. I’ve never used M Glass with it. Preferring to use EFS lenses 10-18 and 18-135. These paired excellent with the M5. I bought the eosR to replace my 5DIII as it’s was hardly being used being so bulky and heavy I only used it with my bigger lenses as the 100-400 didn’t sit well on the M5. If canon can solution EFS glass replacement on the M5 II with an R type mount I’d be a happy man