Article: The 5 Reasons Why I Switched Back to Canon From Sony

Orangutan

EOR R
Sep 25, 2010
2,140
3
Valvebounce said:
Hi Orangutan.
I seem to recall product photography was discussed in great detail, with a very good argument being made on why to get a pro to do it for you (or at least someone who understands photography and lighting, like a brother!) if you want to actually sell the product, nothing hinders sales more than a poor photo!

Cheers, Graham.
Yes, but "pros" have to start somewhere. It may be foolish to rely on your own product photography without the skills, but if she's looking to build skills, she might as well practice on her own product. I would hope that a working jewelry artist would be able to tell if her early photo work was crap.
 

Talys

Canon 6DII
Feb 16, 2017
2,056
328
Vancouver, BC
Orangutan said:
Valvebounce said:
Hi Orangutan.
I seem to recall product photography was discussed in great detail, with a very good argument being made on why to get a pro to do it for you (or at least someone who understands photography and lighting, like a brother!) if you want to actually sell the product, nothing hinders sales more than a poor photo!

Cheers, Graham.
Yes, but "pros" have to start somewhere. It may be foolish to rely on your own product photography without the skills, but if she's looking to build skills, she might as well practice on her own product. I would hope that a working jewelry artist would be able to tell if her early photo work was crap.
I am absolutely with Orangutan.

The key to "doing it yourself" is to not accept a photograph that isn't as good as what a professional charging you top dollar would produce. To get there, all you need is some lighting, a roll of paper and time to learn -- and some good reading on lighting is helpful too.

If you have the will to generate good photographs, whether it's textiles or jewelry or automobiles, the subject isn't going anywhere, so given enough time, you can figure it out -- and then it will be a lot easier the next time. Product photography also has the benefit to allowing those who are learning to (generally) use continuous lights instead of strobes/flashes for difficult shots -- and then move to strobes and fancier modifiers later on. This is especially true of items like gemstones that reflect and refract light in all sorts of interesting ways.

The real argument against doing it yourself is that all the photography and lighting equipment, and in some cases, the space (if your subject is larger) is much more expensive than just having someone who does it for a living take care of it for you. But then again, if it's your hobby, there is satisfaction to being able to produce it yourself!

And if all else fails, and you don't like your photos, you can hire someone to do it on location, observe what they do, and figure out what you did wrong :)
 

Valvebounce

EOS 5D SR
Apr 3, 2013
4,200
166
52
Isle of Wight
Hi Folks.
Please don’t get me wrong, we all start out somewhere, my thought is that learning (and investing a sizeable chunk of cash in) a new skill might not be the best way to sell items for your main income?
I completely get the ‘I can do this’ attitude, there are a good many things around here that I have done with the ‘if they can do it so can I attitude.’
However, ‘I can build a gearbox and overdrive’ doesn’t seem to have given me much preparation for ‘I can skim and paint this bedroom wall!’ Apparently there are tricks of the trade I don’t know or the original (purple) paint on the wall wouldn’t be blistering under the new emulsion paint! ;D
Apparently not everything can be done by everybody, but my outlay is under £100 to discover I can’t do this well!

Cheers, Graham.

Talys said:
Orangutan said:
Valvebounce said:
Hi Orangutan.
I seem to recall product photography was discussed in great detail, with a very good argument being made on why to get a pro to do it for you (or at least someone who understands photography and lighting, like a brother!) if you want to actually sell the product, nothing hinders sales more than a poor photo!

Cheers, Graham.
Yes, but "pros" have to start somewhere. It may be foolish to rely on your own product photography without the skills, but if she's looking to build skills, she might as well practice on her own product. I would hope that a working jewelry artist would be able to tell if her early photo work was crap.
I am absolutely with Orangutan.

The key to "doing it yourself" is to not accept a photograph that isn't as good as what a professional charging you top dollar would produce. To get there, all you need is some lighting, a roll of paper and time to learn -- and some good reading on lighting is helpful too.

If you have the will to generate good photographs, whether it's textiles or jewelry or automobiles, the subject isn't going anywhere, so given enough time, you can figure it out -- and then it will be a lot easier the next time. Product photography also has the benefit to allowing those who are learning to (generally) use continuous lights instead of strobes/flashes for difficult shots -- and then move to strobes and fancier modifiers later on. This is especially true of items like gemstones that reflect and refract light in all sorts of interesting ways.

The real argument against doing it yourself is that all the photography and lighting equipment, and in some cases, the space (if your subject is larger) is much more expensive than just having someone who does it for a living take care of it for you. But then again, if it's your hobby, there is satisfaction to being able to produce it yourself!

And if all else fails, and you don't like your photos, you can hire someone to do it on location, observe what they do, and figure out what you did wrong :)