Bee's

tomscott

Photographer & Graphic Designer
With Bee populations ever declining in the UK, and being such important pollinators. I think really important to do your bit and help them on their way. We found this bee very lethargic, looking sorry for itself. So We put a little honey in a cup and added some water then used a pipette to put a drop on the floor the bee seemed to love it! Sticking its long tongue out, a few minutes later it flew off!

Bee sipping honey and water by Tom Scott, on Flickr
 

tomscott

Photographer & Graphic Designer
The reason for the decline in the UK is that agricultural practises have changed for a more intensive farming system. British fields used to be filled with wild flowers, crops or livestock. This supported a greater diversity of wildlife, since 1940 two species have become extinct and now we're only just realising how important they are as pollinators.
 

YuengLinger

EOR R
Dec 20, 2012
2,245
276
Southeastern USA
tomscott said:
With Bee populations ever declining in the UK, and being such important pollinators. I think really important to do your bit and help them on their way. We found this bee very lethargic, looking sorry for itself. So We put a little honey in a cup and added some water then used a pipette to put a drop on the floor the bee seemed to love it! Sticking its long tongue out, a few minutes later it flew off!

Bee sipping honey and water by Tom Scott, on Flickr
Bees might be one of the most often attempted but botched subjects in photography. Very difficult to get a compelling shot. As fascinating as they are to see with the eyes, they are, in my opinion, generally the least photogenic of insects.

But, tomscott, you have done something special here. I imagine there was a learning curve.

While it is nice to see a bee hovering near a flower, as photographs go, I think the bee and the flower compete too much for attention, and finding just the right balance is extremely rare. These smaller flowers really work!
 

Oceo

EOS M50
Jan 27, 2014
28
0
I concur on the great importance of bees and I mourn the declining number of them that we see in our suburban garden. Application of neonicotinoid insecticides is perverse in our neighbourhood and likely the cause of the decline in our bee population.

A couple of weeks ago I spent ten days out in the bush of northern Ontario. No farms, practically no other humans, but wildflowers and bees galore! Except for the one caught by the spider.
 

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scyrene

EOR R
Dec 4, 2013
2,385
223
UK
www.flickr.com
I nearly started a new topic for bees. We need more bees here!

Bee season is just kicking off here. Here's a beautiful female Andrena fulva (tawny mining bee), a fairly widespread species that has to be one of the best-looking. This is a handheld focus stack with ambient light and the 100L macro lens.
 

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neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
23,995
1,214
"Pollinating the Milkweed"

EOS 7D, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM @ 400mm, 1/640 s, f/5.6, ISO 100

"Bumbling the Cohosh"

EOS 5D Mark II, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM, 1/640 s, f/9, ISO 1600

I guess it's been a while since I've shot any images of bees, since the only piece of gear I have left from what was used above is the 100L Macro. Not too many flowers open yet, but we're getting there here in New England.
 

scyrene

EOR R
Dec 4, 2013
2,385
223
UK
www.flickr.com
neuroanatomist said:
"Pollinating the Milkweed"

EOS 7D, EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM @ 400mm, 1/640 s, f/5.6, ISO 100

"Bumbling the Cohosh"

EOS 5D Mark II, EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM, 1/640 s, f/9, ISO 1600

I guess it's been a while since I've shot any images of bees, since the only piece of gear I have left from what was used above is the 100L Macro. Not too many flowers open yet, but we're getting there here in New England.
Nice shots! Bees are good for when the birds aren't behaving :)