Big price drops on the EOS 5D Mark IV, EOS R and more

unfocused

EOS 5D SR
Jul 20, 2010
4,991
1,343
66
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
Those are big drops for mid-October. We usually don't see those kinds of discounts until Black Friday (or the week leading up to it).
Some fact checking. Looking specifically at the EOS R: Street Price last summer was around $1,756. Now $1,729. Is $27 a big drop?

In my experience, the high end cameras (non Rebels) don't follow the traditional Black Friday schedule. Deals can begin anytime from October through December. I assume that is because retailers and Canon both determine pricing based on how much inventory they need to move before the end of the year and what it will take to move that inventory or hit sales targets.

But, the real point of my post was to correct the idea that these discounts "may be signaling new announcements." In fact, discounts are far more closely tied to retailers and manufacturers trying to reach sales targets than they are to new announcements.

If, as you suggest, the discounts are beginning earlier this year (I'm not sure they are) that is just as likely to be a reflection of concern about a weakening economy as it is about impending announcements. In fact, I'd guess it's more likely.
 
May 31, 2016
6
17
Grey/unauthorized prices on 5d4 have been sub $1900 USD for a solid month or more, and right now the EOS R is close to $1500 grey/unauthorized.

Over the years I've purchased every which way imaginable (new and used) and had always been leery of going grey/unauthorized route, but I finally tried it about 2 years ago, and haven't looked back since.

It takes a little while for new gear to become available this way so unless its a preorder situation or you're a very early adopter than I would at least consider going grey/unauthorized if the savings are substantial...it's worked for me.
 

jeanluc

EOS 80D
Oct 29, 2012
154
64
I wonder when we will see any kind of price drop on the new RF trinity. They are new, but I suspect there are a lot of people like me who own an R but are waiting for the next version or the high MP version before buying a bunch of RF glass. I bet we will see a small discount big some kind on these lenses sooner rather than later just to get some out there. Or at least that is my wishful thinking.
 

unfocused

EOS 5D SR
Jul 20, 2010
4,991
1,343
66
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
I wonder when we will see any kind of price drop on the new RF trinity. They are new, but I suspect there are a lot of people like me who own an R but are waiting for the next version or the high MP version before buying a bunch of RF glass. I bet we will see a small discount big some kind on these lenses sooner rather than later just to get some out there. Or at least that is my wishful thinking.
Lens prices tend to be less fluid. If memory serves me correctly, it usually takes up to a year or more before you see any kind of a reduction -- which generally comes in the form of an instant rebate. In the short term, your best bet is the Canon Price Watch street price program.
 
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Dec 6, 2018
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Some fact checking. Looking specifically at the EOS R: Street Price last summer was around $1,756. Now $1,729. Is $27 a big drop?
Sounds like some sloppy facts.

Street price is used price, not new price from Canon dealers. The EOS R hasn't gone any lower than $1999 last summer, for brand new.
 

felipeolveram

I'm New Here
Dec 14, 2018
22
15
memphis, tn
www.felipeolveram.com
Sounds like some sloppy facts.

Street price is used price, not new price from Canon dealers. The EOS R hasn't gone any lower than $1999 last summer, for brand new.
Street price are definitely not used price, it's brand new price from canon dealers. Have you inquired about street price before? I can't tell you the details but it is.
 
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unfocused

EOS 5D SR
Jul 20, 2010
4,991
1,343
66
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
Sounds like some sloppy facts.

Street price is used price, not new price from Canon dealers. The EOS R hasn't gone any lower than $1999 last summer, for brand new.
Street price is the price negotiated by Gordon over at Canon Price Watch from authorized Canon dealers in the U.S. or Canada. Dealers are not identified because that would violate MAP. All are new and include full Canon USA warranty.
 

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,577
679
Southeastern USA
Street price is the price negotiated by Gordon over at Canon Price Watch from authorized Canon dealers in the U.S. or Canada. Dealers are not identified because that would violate MAP. All are new and include full Canon USA warranty.
I'm not convinced all the "street price" deals are 100% new. I believe there are times a shop is willing to move stock, acquired directly from the manufacturer or another dealer; however, I also suspect there are times an item has been returned for various reasons, perhaps more than once, having been rejected whimsically by online buyers or having been "tried" for a short time and sent back. (I've received, when buying "new" items directly from dealers with stellar reputations, other people's returns. CPW can say honestly what they have been told by dealers, yet still arrange for the sale of an item I wouldn't knowingly choose.)

Yes, street-price deals still have the warranty, etc., as do those other-shoppers'-returns we receive directly from big name stores. When I spot them, and it is usually easy because of repacking, fingerprints, or package marring, or missing literature, back they go. (And then to CPW?)

I'm sure many people are getting great gear at big discounts from the street-price program. I've been tempted! But I just can't get past my concerns. Last month I received an expensive prime lens from a huge online camera company. It arrived with an upside down cardboard tray Canon uses to hold the literature and pouch; plus there wasn't a warranty card in the package. I called Canon to confirm that, yes, warranty cards should still be included with new lenses, even Rf lenses. Canon also said, "Don't worry about it. The company you bought from has a great reputation. Try it for a month. If you have problems after that, you are under warranty for a year with your proof of purchase. You don't need the warranty card."

Right. Back it went--without ever being tried! Am I unreasonably picky?

I suppose, buy ignoring the street-price deals, I am sometimes throwing away money for perceived peace of mind. :cautious: And an extra two or three weeks to find a problem with an item! (The grace period through street-price is not as long as normal, if I remember correctly.)
 
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unfocused

EOS 5D SR
Jul 20, 2010
4,991
1,343
66
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
I'm not convinced all the "street price" deals are 100% new. I believe there are times a shop is willing to move stock, acquired directly from the manufacturer or another dealer; however, I also suspect there are times an item has been returned for various reasons, perhaps more than once, having been rejected whimsically by online buyers or having been "tried" for a short time and sent back. (I've received, when buying "new" items directly from dealers with stellar reputations, other people's returns. CPW can say honestly what they have been told by dealers, yet still arrange for the sale of an item I wouldn't knowingly choose.)

Yes, street-price deals still have the warranty, etc., as do those other-shoppers'-returns we receive directly from big name stores. When I spot them, and it is usually easy because of repacking, fingerprints, or package marring, or missing literature, back they go. (And then to CPW?)

I'm sure many people are getting great gear at big discounts from the street-price program. I've been tempted! But I just can't get past my concerns. Last month I received an expensive prime lens from a huge online camera company. It arrived with an upside down cardboard tray Canon uses to hold the literature and pouch; plus there wasn't a warranty card in the package. I called Canon to confirm that, yes, warranty cards should still be included with new lenses, even Rf lenses. Canon also said, "Don't worry about it. The company you bought from has a great reputation. Try it for a month. If you have problems after that, you are under warranty for a year with your proof of purchase. You don't need the warranty card."

Right. Back it went--without ever being tried! Am I unreasonably picky?

I suppose, but ignoring the street-price deals, I am sometimes throwing away money for perceived peace of mind. :cautious: And an extra two or three weeks to find a problem with an item! (The grace period through street-price is not as long as normal, if I remember correctly.)
Well, you can convince yourself of almost anything.

Every lens and body I've bought through CPW has been brand new, unopened, in Canon's original packaging. Full warranty, no problems. You really should read Gordon's excellent explanations of the various ways merchants sell products (Direct from authorized dealer, Grey Market and Unauthorized Dealer but with US warranty, are some examples). Educating yourself about the system is better than needlessly worrying.

Street price is always brand new, unopened from an authorized dealer with full U.S. warranty. The return policies are the same return policies these dealers always follow. When buying, you deal directly with the dealer and if you aren't comfortable with that dealer, you don't have to buy. It's really all very simple, an authorized dealer can sell a product for any price they choose, but they cannot advertise that product for sale at that price without violating MAP. All Gordon is doing is hooking up buyers with authorized dealers who are willing to accept a slightly lower price for the benefit of moving more stock.
 

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,577
679
Southeastern USA
Well, you can convince yourself of almost anything.

Every lens and body I've bought through CPW has been brand new, unopened, in Canon's original packaging. Full warranty, no problems. You really should read Gordon's excellent explanations of the various ways merchants sell products (Direct from authorized dealer, Grey Market and Unauthorized Dealer but with US warranty, are some examples). Educating yourself about the system is better than needlessly worrying.

Street price is always brand new, unopened from an authorized dealer with full U.S. warranty. The return policies are the same return policies these dealers always follow. When buying, you deal directly with the dealer and if you aren't comfortable with that dealer, you don't have to buy. It's really all very simple, an authorized dealer can sell a product for any price they choose, but they cannot advertise that product for sale at that price without violating MAP. All Gordon is doing is hooking up buyers with authorized dealers who are willing to accept a slightly lower price for the benefit of moving more stock.
I'm glad you've had only good experiences. I wish I could say the same for just buying directly from a retailer, though I've always been able to exchange or return when an item has clearly been already returned by another customer. It is hard to believe that dealers are cherry-picking their best stuff for the street-price program, but maybe.

As for the return policies, I believe you will find that the amount of time to make a return under these sales is shorter than the typical 30 days, but I understand it varies by dealer.

I may give it a try one of these days! Some real savings.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
990
484
Some fact checking. Looking specifically at the EOS R: Street Price last summer was around $1,756. Now $1,729. Is $27 a big drop?

In my experience, the high end cameras (non Rebels) don't follow the traditional Black Friday schedule. Deals can begin anytime from October through December. I assume that is because retailers and Canon both determine pricing based on how much inventory they need to move before the end of the year and what it will take to move that inventory or hit sales targets.

But, the real point of my post was to correct the idea that these discounts "may be signaling new announcements." In fact, discounts are far more closely tied to retailers and manufacturers trying to reach sales targets than they are to new announcements.

If, as you suggest, the discounts are beginning earlier this year (I'm not sure they are) that is just as likely to be a reflection of concern about a weakening economy as it is about impending announcements. In fact, I'd guess it's more likely.
I don't think I made any comment concerning *why* these discounts came when they did, only that they seem a little earlier than normal. You seem to be reading a lot more into my comment that what I actually said.

Now, on to specifics: The EOS R is currently selling at $1,799 from authorized Canon dealers in the U.S. Your source for street prices includes grey market items sold by non-authorized dealers and do not reflect the market price from official Canon retail channels in the U.S.

These are all historically lowest prices for each of these models ever offered through official Canon retail channels in the U.S.

The 5D Mark IV has never sold at an authorized price lower than $2,599 (and that was only for about three weeks with a free BG-E20 thrown in) until this announcement. For most of the past year the official price has been either $2,799 or $2,999.

The 6D Mark II has never sold at an authorized price lower than $1,299 until the recent drop. For most of the last year it fluctuated between $1,299 (which was first seen in late November, 2018) and $1,499 (early February to late May and then again from the beginning of September until the recent announcement).

The EOS R was introduced for $2,299. It dropped to $1,999 in late May and stayed there until last week's announcement, when it fell to $1,799. It's never sold below $1,799 in the U.S. from an authorized Canon dealer (which is the only way buy one and guarantee a U.S. warranty from Canon USA).

In the past, the 5D Mark IV sometimes got Black Friday specials that included either no discount or a very modest discount but came bundled with a free BG-E20 battery grip. Canon has ran the same type of promotion with the 7D Mark II, the 6D, and the 6D Mark II in recent years.

In 2018 the price of the 5D Mark IV from authorized US dealers dropped a little over halfway through November from $3,099, where it had been for over six months, to $2,799. It stayed there until early February, when it went up $200 to $2.999, then came back down to $2,799 in late April.

This year Canon did the free battery grip and an instant rebate (paid directly to the dealer) that was equivalent to $2,599 ($200 discount plus free grip and 13 months of CarePak at no additional cost) back in June. The current pricing of $2,499 does not include a BG-E20 to go with the 5D Mark IV.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
990
484
Lens prices tend to be less fluid. If memory serves me correctly, it usually takes up to a year or more before you see any kind of a reduction -- which generally comes in the form of an instant rebate. In the short term, your best bet is the Canon Price Watch street price program.
If Canon stays true to form, discounts for newly introduced lenses will be in the form of "instant rebates" that can be extended indefinitely with the listed "regular" price staying where it was for several years after introduction. I would not be at all surprised if there are no deep rebates offered in the immediate period following the release of a "pro" R body, either.