BIRD IN FLIGHT ONLY -- share your BIF photos here

Nat_WA

EOS 7D mk.II
Aug 15, 2017
613
169
Netherlands
Sorry, it never turned face to me (I mean the Red-tail)... With the Red-bill it's even more complicated: for ~2h it came once around and you catch what you can...
Indeed... First picture gives a very nice view of the bird slowing down for landing - but indeed pity that the head / eyes are not visible... as you note, you take what you can and be happy with it, especially if it is such a rare occasion.
Second picture shows the birds eye stripe very nicely, and the extended tail waiving behind the bird - quite a sight :)!
W.
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
678
458
Wiebe, the first picture is the Red-tailed Tropicbird, they are not rare and are nesting here. I'm not sure it is slowing down for landing, it was doing circles above the nest site every time making this display in front of the nest...
The second picture is the rare for the islands Red-billed Tropic bird. I know it's kind of confusing because both birds have red bill... The Red-billed is easily separated by the white tail... Look at the tails of both species (and yes, the eye strip of the Red-billed is longer than in the Red-tailed...).
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
678
458
I'm still in process of valuating the photos from my last few weekends and got to this "problem":
When shooting a choppers for example you don't want to see a "frost" propeller - you are loosing the motion. On other hand, "freezing" the BIF seems to be very common practice. In the case with the birds I honestly can not decide what is better (or actually what I like better) - to show more details (overall) or to show the motion... I'm a detail maniac but on other hand I really like to show the birds "alive". Here are two photos to illustrate what I mean (do not compare the IQ of the photos, it's about the way how the bird is expressed). I know it's a pretty much personal preference, and question of creativity but still it's interesting to know the opinion of other people...
183386
183387
 

Nat_WA

EOS 7D mk.II
Aug 15, 2017
613
169
Netherlands
I'm still in process of valuating the photos from my last few weekends and got to this "problem":
When shooting a choppers for example you don't want to see a "frost" propeller - you are loosing the motion. On other hand, "freezing" the BIF seems to be very common practice. In the case with the birds I honestly can not decide what is better (or actually what I like better) - to show more details (overall) or to show the motion... I'm a detail maniac but on other hand I really like to show the birds "alive". Here are two photos to illustrate what I mean (do not compare the IQ of the photos, it's about the way how the bird is expressed). I know it's a pretty much personal preference, and question of creativity but still it's interesting to know the opinion of other people...
Obviously I can't speak for 'everybody', but general consensus among nature / bird photographers in my neighbourhood is that "as long as the eye / head is sharp and in focus, it comes down to personal preference and what you want to express with your picture". Within that constraint I do appreciate e.g. some blurring in the wing(tip)s...
Some time ago I experimented a bit with this (see this post)
W.
 
Reactions: ISv

Click

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 29, 2012
11,757
511
Canada
Obviously I can't speak for 'everybody', but general consensus among nature / bird photographers in my neighbourhood is that "as long as the eye / head is sharp and in focus, it comes down to personal preference and what you want to express with your picture". Within that constraint I do appreciate e.g. some blurring in the wing(tip)s...
Some time ago I experimented a bit with this (see this post)
W.
+1


Nice shots, ISv.
 

AlanF

5DSR
Aug 16, 2012
4,735
1,292
I'm still in process of valuating the photos from my last few weekends and got to this "problem":
When shooting a choppers for example you don't want to see a "frost" propeller - you are loosing the motion. On other hand, "freezing" the BIF seems to be very common practice. In the case with the birds I honestly can not decide what is better (or actually what I like better) - to show more details (overall) or to show the motion... I'm a detail maniac but on other hand I really like to show the birds "alive". Here are two photos to illustrate what I mean (do not compare the IQ of the photos, it's about the way how the bird is expressed). I know it's a pretty much personal preference, and question of creativity but still it's interesting to know the opinion of other people...
That level of wingtip motion is clearly more than acceptable, in my opinion. Here is an extreme case I took 5-6 years a with a 7D. I used to keep it at iso400 or below as the sensor was so noisy, and this shot was at 1/320s. As it was the first shot I had of a kingfisher hovering, I accepted it.
183395
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
Apr 30, 2017
678
458
That level of wingtip motion is clearly more than acceptable, in my opinion. Here is an extreme case I took 5-6 years a with a 7D. I used to keep it at iso400 or below as the sensor was so noisy, and this shot was at 1/320s. As it was the first shot I had of a kingfisher hovering, I accepted it.
View attachment 183395
Yeah, it looks extreme for me too... I will accept it too since I still have no kingfisher in my collection...
But I have a hat:)!
 

Don Haines

Beware of cats with laser eyes!
Jun 4, 2012
7,861
1,183
Canada
Tricolored Egret
Canon 7D Mk2 with Canon 500mm f4 lens, handheld.
1/800 s, f5, ISO 250 for the first ones, and 1/640, f5, ISO 250 for the last one. These photos were taken near Eagle Island on the St. Lawrence River, QC, Canada
Nice pictures, but I believe that the bird is a Great Blue Heron.....

I do not believe that there is such a bird as a Tricolored Egret, there is a tri-colored Heron, but it is not native to the area and that bird isn't it. Great Blue Herons are not only native to the area, but quite common. I rarely go for a paddle in the canoe without seeing one. They fish in my back yard so I see them a lot!

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Reactions: ISv

Lalumière

I'm New Here
Jan 5, 2019
22
66
Montreal
www.pbase.com
Nice pictures, but I believe that the bird is a Great Blue Heron.....

I do not believe that there is such a bird as a Tricolored Egret, there is a tri-colored Heron, but it is not native to the area and that bird isn't it. Great Blue Herons are not only native to the area, but quite common. I rarely go for a paddle in the canoe without seeing one. They fish in my back yard so I see them a lot!

View attachment 183408View attachment 183407
Thank you for letting me know about the breed and the details.