Black Friday: Calibrate Your Display for as low as $99.99!

Canon Rumors Guy

EOS-1D X Mark II
Jul 20, 2010
7,111
62
Canada
www.canonrumors.com
#1
Are you calibrating your monitor? If not, what are you waiting for?
Until a photo is printed, the monitor is its “frame.” It is the basis for your assessment – the window into your image file. We’re often asked, “Is it even necessary to calibrate a monitor? The images already look really good.” If you are working in isolation and view images exclusively on your display, this may seem sufficient. But those who edit their images on an uncalibrated monitor with a color cast are unwittingly building color errors into the image file, based on inaccuracies on the monitor. If you then edit large quantities of image data in batch processing mode using this incorrect basis for assessment, you are destroying your image files – particularly if you don’t create copies or if you don’t use the RAW format as the starting point for your workflow.

Only when you choose to display your images elsewhere (different display, photo album, fine art print, etc.) will you realize that the wrong...
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Nov 12, 2016
348
91
#3
I was about to get something like this, but then I realized that all they do is calibrate the display to some theoretical neutral. I was hoping for something that would match the output of a certain printer to your display. What use is something like this for making prints if all it does is calibrate your display to a supposedly correct setting, but still doesn't take into account whatever color cast or brightness difference may result from using a certain printer?
 

YuengLinger

EOS 6D Mark II
Dec 20, 2012
2,073
109
Southeastern USA
#4
I was about to get something like this, but then I realized that all they do is calibrate the display to some theoretical neutral. I was hoping for something that would match the output of a certain printer to your display. What use is something like this for making prints if all it does is calibrate your display to a supposedly correct setting, but still doesn't take into account whatever color cast or brightness difference may result from using a certain printer?
A good Canon or Epson photo printer output is the standard towards which the Spyder sets the monitor color profile. Colors should be extremely close, and the user makes some minor tweaks to brightness on the display. This makes printing easier and cheaper than most any other method of achieving color accuracy.

Lightroom soft proofing is amazingly good at emulating different papers to guide final adjustments for printing.