Black & White

Oct 1, 2015
75
4
But do you believe that you could have made the digital images identical to the ones originally shot on film, had you so wished ?
probably very close. it seems to me a little like bokeh differences. the film has high acutance in the in focus high contrast areas which falls off into the background areas, especially the flat gray midtone areas; with less of the unsharp masking edge look, so the fall off is subtle, without the clear edge digital has. same subject film and digital (different shows):
 

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Durf

Picture Taker - Image Maker
A quick question:

Do ya'll go out to shoot Black and White with purpose of mind beforehand? Or do you while out, see something you think "hey would look good B&W", or do you do like I seem to always do.....

I have a shot I like but can't get it to look right with color....try B&W filter and Voila...it looks great like that....

LOL....

Just curious how ya'lls process is now that there isn't a choice you HAVE to make a beginning of shoot with physical film.

TIA,

cayenne
I very seldom snap a shot with the intentions of making a B&W (unless I'm shooting antiques and such with a B&W mission in mind). ;)

I often times though in post will create a version and see what B&W looks like of the image and then decide which route to go.
Sometimes I'm amazed and surprised at what a brilliant and awesome color image looks like in B&W.....

Perspective can be an ever changing work in progress sometimes.....

Tam85Test1_20180420_007.jpg
 

cayenne

EOS 7D Mark II
Mar 28, 2012
1,690
27
Thanks!!

I've actually been thinking of going out on a coming weekend, and going out with the intention of shooting only B&W....I was contemplating putting the B&W profile setting on my camera, so that when looking at the images on the back, I'd be seeing them in B&W.....

I'd like to train my eye for this type shooting, and figured this might be a good way to make myself do it...and, it sin't like the color is lost,I can still bring it back in post.....

Anyone ever done anything in this manner?

TIA,

cayenne
 

Pookie

Don't forget to gargle private...
A quick question:

Do ya'll go out to shoot Black and White with purpose of mind beforehand? Or do you while out, see something you think "hey would look good B&W", or do you do like I seem to always do.....

I have a shot I like but can't get it to look right with color....try B&W filter and Voila...it looks great like that....

LOL....

Just curious how ya'lls process is now that there isn't a choice you HAVE to make a beginning of shoot with physical film.

TIA,

cayenne
I intentionally shoot BW film. If you shoot enough BW you'll find that you see images in BW... it's different than color. If your just shooting and then deciding afterwards to convert I think your missing the beauty of BW photography.

As for some of the comments above... I shoot digital (Canon, Leica and Pentax) and analog (Leica, Mamiya, Rollei, Canon, etc)... both have their place. Digital is great but why do you think there are so many filters trying to emulate film? And the key word there is emulate. Digital has a different image profile, different fall off, etc... you can massage it to "look" like film but often what is missed is the nuances. Is it better... no. Is it worse... no. It's different, I used to think it was just me that saw or felt something different about film compared to digital. So I dug out all my old gear and started to explore film again on my own. I have run a studio for years, wedding and portraiture. Mainly digital but over the years I have shied away from digital for all of my personal work as I have grown tired of the look. I shoot large format, medium and 135... because I can and I like it. The great thing is, at this point even clients are starting to ask for film. Over the last two years I've now shot 30-40% of the weddings on film.

I know this is sacrilegious for a Canon digital site but film is making a comeback these days. If you don't think so you're burying your head in the sand. Many photographers are out there moving to film... or at the very least pulling out their dad's/grandpa's old film camera and starting to shoot again. Look at social media, look at commercial wedding photogs what you'll see is more and more film these days. Will it ever take over, nope. Will it die, nope. They can both play together.

And if you don't believe me... then ask yourself why Kodak just started back up the Ektachrome line? (which BTW, I have a massive order in for :) )

So here is a converted image just for the occasion... My M6, bought in 92' used for 1700$ today retails for about 2500$ ( body only ) with the Summicron 50mm f/2 . And this is also my point regarding quality film cameras as opposed to new digital. What digital do you know that goes up in price 36 or even say 10 years after production? I'll wait... and my M4 or M3 have gone up in value even more. This is why they still kick ass to this day. Not even my newest Leica will do this... my M10 once driven off the show room floor dropped by a 1000$ immediately.

Canon 5D4 w/24-70 II

 
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