Canon’s EOS-1D X Mark II equivalent mirrorless is coming sooner than originally thought [CR1]

cpsico

EOS RP
Mar 27, 2011
356
10
My EOS R cane with an adapter that allows me to use my EF lenses ranging from 11mm to 600mm. TS-E. 5x Macro. My flashes and radio triggers work, too. No hassle, and EF is a much more mature system than FE.
How is the functionality of EF on the EOS R?
 

Keith_Reeder

No apologies for not suffering fools gladly...
Feb 8, 2014
823
269
59
Blyth, NE England
My EOS R cane with an adapter that allows me to use my EF lenses ranging from 11mm to 600mm. TS-E. 5x Macro. My flashes and radio triggers work, too. No hassle, and EF is a much more mature system than FE.
Wait: the way you've written that, it's almost as if Canon has presented its users with a sensible, versatile, and practical way to get the best out of their existing and new gear.

Surely not?

:sneaky:
 
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unfocused

EOS 1D MK II
Jul 20, 2010
5,007
1,363
66
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,057
513
How is the functionality of EF on the EOS R?
EF lenses are EOS system lenses.

RF lenses are EOS system lenses.

The RF communication protocol is built upon the same EOS protocol that EF cameras and lenses use. It's the equivalent of "USB3.1" compared to "USB2".
RF cameras and lenses have certain additional/expanded capabilities in terms of lens/body communication that EF cameras and lenses do not. But there is nothing that an EF lens can do on an EF body that it can not do on an RF body.

When using an EF lens on an RF camera via one of several EF-RF adapters from Canon, the EF lenses lose none of the functionality they have when used on EF bodies. NONE. On the other hand, they may not have certain functionality that RF lenses have on RF cameras. But that is functionality the EF system never had, so EF lenses do not lose anything when used on RF bodies.

Nothing.Nada.Zilch.Nought. Zip.Zero.
 

TAF

EOS RP
Feb 26, 2012
344
35
EF lenses are EOS system lenses.

RF lenses are EOS system lenses.

The RF communication protocol is built upon the same EOS protocol that EF cameras and lenses use. It's the equivalent of "USB3.1" compared to "USB2".
RF cameras and lenses have certain additional/expanded capabilities in terms of lens/body communication that EF cameras and lenses do not. But there is nothing that an EF lens can do on an EF body that it can not do on an RF body.

When using an EF lens on an RF camera via one of several EF-RF adapters from Canon, the EF lenses lose none of the functionality they have when used on EF bodies. NONE. On the other hand, they may not have certain functionality that RF lenses have on RF cameras. But that is functionality the EF system never had, so EF lenses do not lose anything when used on RF bodies.

Nothing.Nada.Zilch.Nought. Zip.Zero.

In fairness to the poster who asked the question, it is reasonable question given our previous experience where EF lenses did not appear to work as well on the 'M' sub-system with the Canon adapter as they do on a regular DSLR.

I have an 'M', and find the behavior with the adapter somewhat disappointing.

I am pleased Canon managed to nail it this time, so when the R body comes out with IBIS I will not hesitate (except for the cringe when I look at the price) to pick one up to start me down the full frame mirrorless road.
 

scyrene

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 4, 2013
2,509
395
UK
www.flickr.com
I would rather see a later truly pro camera that puts the competition back to the stone age as the EOS system did 30+ years ago.
You're going to be disapointed then, this is not even remotely realistic (from any manufacturer). While I wasn't involved in photography back then, and so can't assess whether you're exaggerating, 2019 is not 1989, and no revolutionary developments are currently on the cards for consumer cameras.

It has taken this long for the competition to catch up to the EOS and now an incremental lame introduction just is not going to impress. It must be hyper fast, full frame 8K at 120p with no crop or line skipping as Nikon and Sony do to make the FF claim. In other words skip the lame 4K, that train has left the station, move on to a blow them away 8K that is not dumbed down and the still frame rate is second to none by a good margin. No rolling shutter issues either. Minimum stills at 50 MP for this camera and DR at 25 stops. Canon has all these capabilities now they just refuse to incorporate them into their regular camera lines.
Oh I see :rolleyes:
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
1,364
748
You're going to be disapointed then, this is not even remotely realistic (from any manufacturer). While I wasn't involved in photography back then, and so can't assess whether you're exaggerating, 2019 is not 1989, and no revolutionary developments are currently on the cards for consumer cameras.
I think it is possible, but it will come from an unexpected angle, such as the ability to use external GPUs.
 

3kramd5

EOS 5D MK IV
Mar 2, 2012
3,083
404
I think it is possible, but it will come from an unexpected angle
Agreed. For me to call something a revolution it will have to change how we use/interact with something (in this case a camera). Improvements to what cameras already do are welcome, but evolutionary.
 

scyrene

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 4, 2013
2,509
395
UK
www.flickr.com
I think it is possible, but it will come from an unexpected angle, such as the ability to use external GPUs.
I don't doubt future paradigmatic shifts are possible - even likely - but when and how is unknown and really beyond the scope of this discussion. But out of interest, what do you mean? More processing power? For computational imaging?
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
1,364
748
Content-aware focusing/exposure/IS, for example. "Track a cat, keep the whole head in the DoF, pan the background if needed; ignore dogs".
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
1,364
748
The ability to add cat ears, noses and whiskers to subjects might be even more popular.
Yeah, but that can be done in post.

The ability to decide "the thing we are tracking is a white cat, we should not overexpose it except for backlit halo" cannot.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,057
513
In fairness to the poster who asked the question, it is reasonable question given our previous experience where EF lenses did not appear to work as well on the 'M' sub-system with the Canon adapter as they do on a regular DSLR.

I have an 'M', and find the behavior with the adapter somewhat disappointing.

I am pleased Canon managed to nail it this time, so when the R body comes out with IBIS I will not hesitate (except for the cringe when I look at the price) to pick one up to start me down the full frame mirrorless road.
The main issue with EOS M is the rate at which Canon is willing to allow the camera to supply power to the AF motor in the lens. This is not unique to EOS M bodies, though. Smaller EOS DSLRs with smaller batteries can also have the same issues. So could EOS RF mount cameras with smaller batteries.

But that is not anything that is inherent in the EOS M mount or EOS EF mount or EOS R mount. All three interfaces are capable of supplying more power than some bodies in all three mounts may be able to supply.