Canon again mentions a Pro EOS R body, with IBIS and dual card slots

SteveC

M50 & T6i
Sep 3, 2019
381
236
I think Canon will eventually (and I mean in several years) switch over the Rebel line to the RF mount, and also create a 7D equivalent in the R series. Along with that, I think they will create RF-S glass for those APS-C sensors. If that happens, RF-S will be in direct conflict with M, and M will lose that battle. Obviously all heavy speculation...but just my two cents.
As long as we're blatantly speculating here, the opposite possibility is that they'll push ALL APS-C towards the M mount (they'd need more EF-M lenses to do that, though, and those lenses would have to be of greater diameter than the ones so far). They've already got an enthusiast body for the M, so it seems to make some sense that they could start doing enthusiast lenses for it, in addition to the lenses intended to be compact (making larger lenses wouldn't negate the ones that are out there already). (At this point,, someone is going to jump in here and tell me that "marketing" has decided that no matter how awesome an EF-M camera might be it's targeted to beginners. To which I say, 1) you don't know what they're thinking, 2) "marketing" can change their mind and decide there's an opportunity in making the M series more enthusiast friendly, and 3) we don't know that they haven't already changed their mind and such lenses are in the pipeline.)

With those additional lenses, it would be doable, the only people left hanging would be some in the 7D crowd. (Some would be satisfied with an enthusiast M camera and adapting EF and EF-S lenses.) And I suspect there could be a hi-res R camera out there with a mode to "pretend" it's an APS-C for the benefit of very high-end users of APS-C. That would allow them to use the RF lenses that they're pining for while still keeping their crop factor (and relatively smaller file sizes). The downside, of course, would be bulk and expense; they'd be paying for a full frame sensor they don't have as much use for (though they might find uses for it once they have it).

On the R end of things I see room for an 83 MP High Res (their 32MP APS-C scaled up to full frame) and something in the 40-60 MP range as a "mid res" (still higher than almost anything else they have). With a lot more speed than the present-day sensors!
 

CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,166
1,737
Irving, Texas
Maybe "most of the time" technique is involved, if you are judging the world's population of photographers. On the other hand, even among pros, semi-pros, and enthusiastic and highly skilled amateurs, there is a factor we call "aging." Then there are people who aren't too old but have hands that aren't steady. You might argue along the lines of, "Well, Canon shouldn't make cameras just for left-handed photographers because that would be a feature I don't need and it would drive up the price." That would be an interesting analogy. But overcoming left-handedness starts early in life; shaky hands come later in most cases.

I believe there is a growing demand for IBIS, which Canon would like to address, and the demand is growing most among people who most need IBIS just as they enter retirement years and now have the time and money to spend on higher end gear. Add this market to that of the video-shooters who, in some situations, prefer IBIS to gimbles, etc., and the numbers start to add up.

I also believe Canon will implement IBIS only if their approach equals or exceeds anything else on the market. And that is why they are taking their time with Rf-mount bodies.
I'm not against IBIS or IS at all. Hope I didn't come across that way. I'd love to have either. My hands also shake as I get older (56). However, when I see people talk about how with today's very fast expensive glass and cameras that IBIS or IS is a given expectation, I have to disagree with them. If I am shooting into the sun through a 6 stop ND filter at f/1.2 (or even f/1.8) and 1/8000 sec, ISO 100, and can't get a sharp photo, then the problem is me. If I am in a dark venue, shooting wide open and expect to keep ISO 100 and a slow shutter speed with moving targets... the problem is me. So really, it is that sort of thing I was addressing. Not the things people can't help, but the things they could help with proper technique and settings. ;) Some people really do think that IBIS or IS will solve problems that really have nothing to do with either technology being there or not.

The most helpful things I ever learned to achieve sharp photos are proper settings and proper technique for the situation. My biggest problem was, and sometimes still is, mashing too hard on the shutter button. I still find myself constantly repeating, "light touch, light touch, light touch..." :)
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,120
548
I think Canon will eventually (and I mean in several years) switch over the Rebel line to the RF mount, and also create a 7D equivalent in the R series. Along with that, I think they will create RF-S glass for those APS-C sensors. If that happens, RF-S will be in direct conflict with M, and M will lose that battle. Obviously all heavy speculation...but just my two cents.
I think you are incorrect that "Rebel" class mirrorless cameras will use the RF mount. Canon has made it pretty clear the EOS M mount is their consumer grade mirrorless mount.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
1,120
548
As long as we're blatantly speculating here, the opposite possibility is that they'll push ALL APS-C towards the M mount (they'd need more EF-M lenses to do that, though, and those lenses would have to be of greater diameter than the ones so far). They've already got an enthusiast body for the M, so it seems to make some sense that they could start doing enthusiast lenses for it, in addition to the lenses intended to be compact (making larger lenses wouldn't negate the ones that are out there already). (At this point,, someone is going to jump in here and tell me that "marketing" has decided that no matter how awesome an EF-M camera might be it's targeted to beginners. To which I say, 1) you don't know what they're thinking, 2) "marketing" can change their mind and decide there's an opportunity in making the M series more enthusiast friendly, and 3) we don't know that they haven't already changed their mind and such lenses are in the pipeline.)

With those additional lenses, it would be doable, the only people left hanging would be some in the 7D crowd. (Some would be satisfied with an enthusiast M camera and adapting EF and EF-S lenses.) And I suspect there could be a hi-res R camera out there with a mode to "pretend" it's an APS-C for the benefit of very high-end users of APS-C. That would allow them to use the RF lenses that they're pining for while still keeping their crop factor (and relatively smaller file sizes). The downside, of course, would be bulk and expense; they'd be paying for a full frame sensor they don't have as much use for (though they might find uses for it once they have it).

On the R end of things I see room for an 83 MP High Res (their 32MP APS-C scaled up to full frame) and something in the 40-60 MP range as a "mid res" (still higher than almost anything else they have). With a lot more speed than the present-day sensors!
But, but, but...

Canon ALWAYS introduces lenses before bodies in new lens mounts so we can complain about not having any high end bodies for new, high end lenses instead of complaining about not having any any mid-grade/enthusiast lenses to use with mid-grade/enthusiast level cameras!
 
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Quirkz

EOS 80D
Oct 30, 2014
179
104
I'm sure I'd migrate to RF glass over time for the reasons you suggest, but for me personally, a big draw was thinking that all the glass might be 10 - 20% smaller. I can't blame anyone for thinking that, the below screenshot is straight from the Canon website specifically marketing the smaller footprint (including lens), so one could easily believe that type of size reduction was universal across all RF glass.

Anyway, thanks everyone for the insight.View attachment 187225
i’m surprised this image is from the canon website, as it’s inaccurate. Even the RP is not this small next to the 5d4. These images are not to the same scale. You can see it most obviously if you compare the size of the hot shoe.

The 24-105 is a little more compact on an R series, mostly because the camera plus lens is smaller overall.
 

Travel_Photographer

Travel, Landscape, Architecture
Aug 30, 2019
40
35
i’m surprised this image is from the canon website, as it’s inaccurate. Even the RP is not this small next to the 5d4. These images are not to the same scale. You can see it most obviously if you compare the size of the hot shoe.

The 24-105 is a little more compact on an R series, mostly because the camera plus lens is smaller overall.
That's pretty deceptive then. Here's the link, you can see the size comparison front and center in the Features section.


It would be one thing if the two cameras were just side by side "more casually", but they went through all the trouble of lining them up and drawing the size-comparison lines.
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
7,966
1,177
119
If your second frame in bursts is almost always sharper than your first, that's a good indicator you're causing camera movement when you press the shutter button.
That is a very smart observation. In my case my second image is normally my worst, first and third are split and fourth and on are generally a waste of electrons.
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
1,414
791
If your second frame in bursts is almost always sharper than your first, that's a good indicator you're causing camera movement when you press the shutter button.
That's why it helps.

I guess lightweight cameras with poor ergonomics are generally more in need of IBIS than pro bodies.
 
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Quirkz

EOS 80D
Oct 30, 2014
179
104
That's pretty deceptive then. Here's the link, you can see the size comparison front and center in the Features section.


It would be one thing if the two cameras were just side by side "more casually", but they went through all the trouble of lining them up and drawing the size-comparison lines.
It’s crazy, right? Someone really messed up. I’m sure it’s not intentional, but it’s a pretty serious mistake.
You can see a side by side photo of the lenses here:

 
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Quirkz

EOS 80D
Oct 30, 2014
179
104
That's pretty deceptive then. Here's the link, you can see the size comparison front and center in the Features section.


It would be one thing if the two cameras were just side by side "more casually", but they went through all the trouble of lining them up and drawing the size-comparison lines.
I also just reported this to canon. They need to fix it.
 
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Sep 2, 2019
2
2
I'm looking forward to a Pro Level Canon Mirrorless with IBIS to compete with the Sony A7R4. However, I think I may stick to my EF glass and use the adapter as I think the RF glass although awesome from what I hear is very expensive. Hopefully RF glass will eventually come down in price down the road or get refurbs.
RF glass at this point is very expensive in comparison to EF. All of my telezooms are Tamron G2 and they compare favorably to Canon and Sigma lenses. I do have some Canon primes. My fear is that when the EOS R pro comes out, the EF glass will take a huge hit on the used market. There is little reason that I can see to switch except for some newer lenses announced with larger apertures and the weight of the new RF lenses are lighter.
 
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Aussie shooter

@brett.guy.photography
Dec 6, 2016
494
498
I hope the next R body has the button placement fixed to the 1dx and 5div standards. Everything feels just a little out of the way, especially the back buttons.
Not going to happen. Smaller bodies simply do not have the real estate to match button type and placement.