Canon Cinema EOS C500 Mark II information [CR1]

Canon Rumors Guy

EOS 1D MK II
Jul 20, 2010
7,530
286
Canada
www.canonrumors.com
There seems to be a lot more talk about coming Cinema EOS products, so I think we’re going to see a major camera announcement sometime in the next couple of months.
We’ve been told the following about the rumoured Canon Cinema EOS C500 Mark II.

First the obvious, the EOS C500 Mark II will sit between the EOS C300 Mark II and EOS C700.
The Cinema EOS C500 Mark II will be full-frame with the ability to do internal RAW recording.
The camera will be somewhat modular, you’ll be able to build the base for your specific needs.
You will be able to switch between PL and EF mounts yourself.
The camera will be approved for Netflix productions

It’s rumoured that the C500 Mark II was shown to specific dealers at NAB last April and should come  before the end of 2019.
The image for this post is the Canon Cinema EOS C300 Mark II
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peters

EOS T7i
Dec 25, 2017
60
49
Is this the 8K monster that was used at that Apple event about a month ago?
I am very interested in this development as well. It looked like, it was working, so maybe we will realy see this?
If its not 8k, the fullframe will be probably enough advantage over the c300 line for people to go for the c500. I certainly would, If I had the money :-D
 

RunAndGun

EOS RP
Dec 16, 2011
308
14
You can swap mounts on RED cameras. It’s a fun process that I don’t recommend doing on set.
Pretty easy on my F55. Literally takes seconds. VariCam takes a little longer, but is pretty straightforward, as well. Let’s see if Canon finally does make a user swappable system and makes it practicle, so that can be done in the field in less than 10 seconds.
 

Tremotino

I'm New Here
Jan 23, 2018
22
7
Munich
Pretty easy on my F55. Literally takes seconds. VariCam takes a little longer, but is pretty straightforward, as well. Let’s see if Canon finally does make a user swappable system and makes it practicle, so that can be done in the field in less than 10 seconds.
why not RF with adapters?
 
Jul 4, 2019
4
3
Canon would do better to make the C200 full-frame and RF-mount. It's in the cheaper cinema cameras that people use regular Canon still lenses.

In the expensive cinema cameras like the C500 and the C700, they use expensive servo zoom lenses or dedicated cinema prime lenses.

If you're going to use a full-frame lens, you may as well use a camera with a full-frame sensor.
 
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bgoyette

EOS T7i
Feb 6, 2015
88
24
What does “approved for Netflix productions” mean?
As Netflix is a major purchaser of independent productions and contracts out the production of a number of it's own properties, they have camera standards, similar to other networks like BBC, Discovery, natGeo, etc. Because it's become such a behemoth in the industry, it's camera specs are watched by all the manufacturers.

Netflix made some waves in the DP community a few years ago when it required 4k capture, essentially blacklisting the most popular camera in the single camera series category -- Arri's Alexa XT. While this camera is responsible for some of the best digitally-captured large screen productions and a huge percentage of TV series produced world wide, it only captures 3.2k and thus is not allowed by Netflix's standards to be used as an A camera. It's stupid, really, most experienced DP's will tell you, but Netflix has stuck to it's guns...essentially forcing Arri to create a 4k camera (the 65 and later the LF) that could be used on Netflix shows.

Now to Canon...not really a big deal, as all of it's Cinema EOS cameras except the C100mkII and C200 are Netflix certified, including the original C500. Not sure why the C200 is excluded...but it's currently not on their list.

(edit: apparently the C200 isn't officially certified by Netflix because it cannot accept timecode input, which would be important if it was being used with other camera's on a set. Thus while not officially certified the C200 can be used in RAW mode on a case by case basis).

 
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Jasonmc89

EOS 80D + 100-400mm mkii
Feb 7, 2019
66
50
UK
As Netflix is a major purchaser of independent productions and contracts out the production of a number of it's own properties, they have camera standards, similar to other networks like BBC, Discovery, natGeo, etc. Because it's become such a behemoth in the industry, it's camera specs are watched by all the manufacturers.

Netflix made some waves in the DP community a few years ago when it required 4k capture, essentially blacklisting the most popular camera in the single camera series category -- Arri's Alexa XT. While this camera is responsible for some of the best digitally-captured large screen productions and a huge percentage of TV series produced world wide, it only captures 3.2k and thus is not allowed by Netflix's standards to be used as an A camera. It's stupid, really, most experienced DP's will tell you, but Netflix has stuck to it's guns...essentially forcing Arri to create a 4k camera (the 65 and later the LF) that could be used on Netflix shows.

Now to Canon...not really a big deal, as all of it's Cinema EOS cameras except the C100mkII and C200 are Netflix certified, including the original C500. Not sure why the C200 is excluded...but it's currently not on their list.

(edit: apparently the C200 isn't officially certified by Netflix because it cannot accept timecode input, which would be important if it was being used with other camera's on a set. Thus while not officially certified the C200 can be used in RAW mode on a case by case basis).

Very interesting! Thank you for your reply :)