Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM

ScottyP

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 18, 2012
791
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Re: Canon EF 800 f/5.6L IS

dolina said:
Thanks Brian, Michael and Jerome.

This was positioned at the edge and 2-3 stops underexposed. IQ is not the reason why I posted this. ;D


Bomb's Away by alabang, on Flickr

The Philippine Duck (Anas luzonica) is a large dabbling duck of the genus Anas. Fewer than 10,000 remain.

It has a black crown, nape and eye stripe, with a cinnamon head and neck. Rest of body is greyish brown with a bright green speculum. Its legs are greyish brown, and its bill is blue grey.

It eats shrimp, fish, insects, and vegetation, and it frequents all types of wetlands.

Source: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_Duck



Common Hill Myna (Gracula religiosa) by alabang, on Flickr

The Common Hill Myna (Gracula religiosa), sometimes spelled "mynah" and formerly simply known as "Hill Myna", is the myna bird most commonly seen in aviculture, where it is often simply referred to by the latter two names. It is a member of the starling family (Sturnidae), resident in hill regions of South Asia and Southeast Asia. The Sri Lanka Hill Myna, a former subspecies of G. religiosa, is generally accepted as a separate species G. ptilogenys nowadays. The Enggano Hill Myna (G. enganensis) and Nias Hill Myna (G. robusta) are also widely accepted as specifically distinct, and many authors favor treating the Southern Hill Myna (G. r. indica) from the Nilgiris and elsewhere in the Western Ghats of India as a separate species also.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Hill_Myna
$13,000 is a lot to catch a duck dropping a deuce. That said, well shot.
 

serendipidy

EOR R
May 7, 2012
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Re: Canon EF 800 f/5.6L IS

Paolo....wow!

How do you find all these birds?

Thanks for all those great photos :D
 

dolina

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serendipidy thanks! I live mostly in the Philippines. We got 200+ poorly documented endemics, 200+ residents and 200+ migrants

Excellent image Maxis.


Philippine Bulbul (Hypsipetes philippinus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Philippine Bulbul (Hypsipetes philippinus) is a songbird species in the bulbul family (Pycnonotidae). It is often placed in the genus Ixos, but is better retained in Hypsipetes as long as this is not entirely merged into Ixos, as it is quite closely related to the type species of Hypsipetes, the Black Bulbul (H. leucocephalus).

It is endemic to the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests; on Mount Kitanglad on Mindanao for example it is abundant in any kind of primary forest at least between 500 and 2,250 m ASL.

Fledglings of the Philippine Bulbul were recorded on Mindanao in late April, but the breeding season seems to be prolonged as females with ripe ovarian follicles were still found in April and May. Territorial songs are heard at lower altitudes as late as May, while further upslope the birds are silent at that time of year and presumably engaged in breeding activity. The Besra (Accipiter virgatus) has been recorded as a predator of young Philippine Bulbuls, and this or other goshawks might also catch adult birds.

A common and adaptable bird as long as sufficient forest remains, it is not considered a threatened species by the IUCN.

Source: Philippine Bulbul - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Taken in Bataan National Park

Settings: 1/500 ƒ/8 ISO1600 800mm
 

dolina

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Chestnut Munia, (Lonchura atricapilla) by alabang, on Flickr

The Chestnut Munia, (Lonchura atricapilla) (formerly considered as a subspecies of the Tricoloured Munia Lonchura malacca atricapilla) also known as Black-headed Munia, is a small passerine bird. This estrildid finch is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Burma, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam and Hawaii. Known as mayang pula ("red maya", to distinguish it from the predominantly brownish Tree Sparrow which is also called maya) in the Philippines, perhaps because of its brick red patch on the lower back that shows only when it flies. The Black-headed Munia is the former national bird of the Philippines (the Philippine national bird is now the Philippine eagle).

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chestnut_Munia

Settings: 1/640 ƒ/5.6 ISO640 800mm

Taken at Candaba, Philippines
 

dolina

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Scotty & Daniel thank you!
Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) by alabang, on Flickr

The Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) is breeds in colonies in reed beds or trees close to large lakes or other extensive wetlands. It builds a bulky stick nest.

It feeds in shallow water, spearing fish, frogs, insects and small mammals. It will often wait motionless for prey, or slowly stalk its victim. It tends to keep within reedbeds more than the Grey Heron, and is often inconspicuous, despite its size.

It has a slow flight, with its neck retracted. This is characteristic of herons and bitterns, and distinguishes them from storks, cranes and spoonbills, which extend their necks. The long neck of Purple Heron looks particularly snake-like, with more of an S-shape in flight. The call is a loud croaking "krek".

The Purple Heron is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purple_Heron

Settings: 1/2000 ƒ/5.6 ISO2500 800mm

Taken at Candaba, Philippines
 

dolina

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Time to perk this thread again...


Philippine Bulbul (Hypsipetes philippinus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Philippine Bulbul (Hypsipetes philippinus) is a songbird species in the bulbul family (Pycnonotidae). It is often placed in the genus Ixos, but is better retained in Hypsipetes as long as this is not entirely merged into Ixos, as it is quite closely related to the type species of Hypsipetes, the Black Bulbul (H. leucocephalus).[1]

It is endemic to the Philippines. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests; on Mount Kitanglad on Mindanao for example it is abundant in any kind of primary forest at least between 500 and 2,250 m ASL.[2]

Fledglings of the Philippine Bulbul were recorded on Mindanao in late April, but the breeding season seems to be prolonged as females with ripe ovarian follicles were still found in April and May. Territorial songs are heard at lower altitudes as late as May, while further upslope the birds are silent at that time of year and presumably engaged in breeding activity. The Besra (Accipiter virgatus) has been recorded as a predator of young Philippine Bulbuls, and this or other goshawks might also catch adult birds.[3]

A common and adaptable bird as long as sufficient forest remains, it is not considered a threatened species by the IUCN.[4]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_Bulbul

Taken: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ternate,_Cavite

Settings: 1/80 ƒ/5.6 ISO160 800mm
 

sandymandy

EOS 7D MK II
Mar 5, 2012
620
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Nice photos, seems like a really impressive lens that ill never own nor want to own :p
Anybody got handheld shots? :D
 

dolina

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White-breasted Waterhen (Amaurornis phoenicurus) by alabang, on Flickr

The White-breasted Waterhen (Amaurornis phoenicurus) is a waterbird of the rail and crake family Rallidae that is widely distributed across Southeast Asia and the Indian Subcontinent. They are dark slaty birds with a clean white face, breast and belly. They are somewhat bolder than most other rails and are often seen stepping slowly with their tail cocked upright in open marshes or even drains near busy roads. They are largely crepuscular in activity and during the breeding season, just after the first rains, make loud and repetitive croaking calls.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-breasted_Waterhen

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Ba%C3%B1os,_Laguna
 

dolina

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“Happiness is the meaning and the purpose of life, the whole aim and end of human existence” by alabang, on Flickr

The Olive-backed Sunbird, Cinnyris jugularis, also known as the Yellow-bellied Sunbird, is a species of sunbird found from Southern Asia to Australia.

The sunbirds are a group of very small Old World passerine birds which feed largely on nectar, although they will also take insects, especially when feeding young. Their flight is fast and direct on their short wings. Most species can take nectar by hovering, but usually perch to feed most of the time.
Olive-backed Sunbird in the Philippines
Male hovering while feeding

The Olive-backed Sunbird is common across southern China to the Philippines and Malaysia down to northeast Australia. They are small songbirds, at most 12 cm long. In most subspecies, the underparts of both male and female are bright yellow, the backs are a dull brown colour. The forehead, throat and upper breast of the adult male is a dark, metallic blue-black. In the Philippines (where they are known as "tamsi") the males of some subspecies have an orange band on the chest, in Wallacea and northern New Guinea some subspecies have most of the underparts blackish, and in southern China and adjacent parts of Vietnam most of the underparts of the male are greyish-white.

Originally from mangrove habitat, the Olive-backed sunbird has adapted well to humans, and is now common even in fairly densely populated areas, even forming their nests in human dwellings.

The birds mate between the months of April and August. Both the male and the female assist in building the nest which is flask-shaped, with an overhanging porch at the entrance, and a trail of hanging material at the bottom end.

After building the nest, the birds abandon the nest for about a week before the female returns to lay one or two greenish-blue eggs. The eggs take a further week to hatch. The female may leave the nest for short periods during the day during incubation. After the chicks have hatched, both male and female assist in the care of the young, which leave the nest about two or three weeks later.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olive-backed_Sunbird

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntinlupa

EXIF: http://www.flickr.com/photos/alabang/9038728093/#meta/
 

dolina

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This thread has been way too quiet.


Philippine Nightjar (Caprimulgus manillensis) by alabang, on Flickr

The Philippine Nightjar (Caprimulgus manillensis) is a species of nightjar in the Caprimulgidae family. It is endemic to the Philippines.

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests, and subtropical or tropical moist montane forests.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philippine_Nightjar

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_the_Philippines_Diliman
 

serendipidy

EOR R
May 7, 2012
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dolina,

Gorgeous photo, as always! I love it whenever you post; always beautiful and exotic photos with informative wikipedia excerpts. Keep doing it :)

Perhaps the thread is not very busy since the EF 800 is so expensive and such a specialty lens (imo).
 

dolina

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Thanks for the reply serendipidy. I strive to educate in as simple a language as possible. I believe that only through education do these animals have a shot of surviving in my lifetime.

Given that both the 2 year old 600 II and 5 year old 800 are both 4 pages long I do not think price is such an issue. ;)
 

ERHP

EOS RP
May 9, 2013
359
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Maxis, great shot of the Merganser.

dolina, just curious but were you using a filter or live view for the sun shot? Awesome!

I've been using a 600 v1 w/ a 1.4 v3 on the 5D MK III for sometime but this last weekend was the first time I've carried the 800mm around instead. I can appreciate the slightly faster AF using the straight lens and definitely no complaints about the 3lbs lighter weight.

Just a midsized Mule Deer getting fat on acorns.
 

Ron Bailey

I'm New Here
Aug 24, 2013
11
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Re: Canon EF 800 f/5.6L IS

Gothmoth said:
i would not say these shots are "amazing" or "awesome"... but maybe thats an american thing, to exaggerate everything.

but the 800mm is sure quite a technical achievement for canon.
Very intelligent comment. Oops, sorry. It's that damned American thing again. :) Because I think you'll miss it, it's called humor. Something you really need in your life, I'm sure.
 

dolina

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Indigo-banded Kingfisher (Alcedo cyanopectus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Indigo-banded Kingfisher (Alcedo cyanopectus) is a species of bird in the Alcedinidae family. It is endemic to the Philippines, where it is a generally uncommon but locally common resident of the northern and central islands. There are two subspecies, the nominate race, which occurs on Luzon, Polillo, Mindoro, Sibuyan and Ticao, and A. c. nigriostris, which is found in Panay, Negros and Cebu. It forms a superspecies with the Silvery Kingfisher of the southern Philippines.[1]
The Indigo-banded Kingfisher feeds on fish and aquatic insects. It perches on rocks and overhanging branches and foliage and dives steeply into the water to catch its prey. Once caught, it returns the prey to the perch where it is beaten and swallowed. Little is known about its breeding behaviour, although it is known to nest in tunnels dug into the banks of streams and rivers.[1]
Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests and subtropical or tropical mangrove forests.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo-banded_Kingfisher

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Mesa_Ecopark
 

AlanF

Canon 5DSR II
Aug 16, 2012
5,468
2,637
Is that a 100% crop or is it a larger size that has been reduced? If reduced, what is the size of the original crop?