Canon EOS-1D X Mark III field testing has begun [CR2]

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
1,387
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Since I am pretty much right by BigFoot Central (aka Sasquatch Land!) in Southwestern British Columbia and Northern Washington State, I've been TRYING FOR YEARS to get a CRYSTAL CLEAR HIGH RESOLUTION STILL PHOTO and VIDEO (even going as far as bringing along multiple Canon C700 GS cameras!) of said Sasquatch and/or UFO and.or Alien Entity! NOTHING! ZERO! I have NEVER seen or shot anything YET! Carl Sagan once said "Absence of Evidence is NOT necessarily Evidence of Absence", so I'm still OPEN to the ideas of Sasquatch, UFO's and Aliens...BUT.... I haven't seen anything yet OTHER THAN as BLURFOS (i.e. Blurry UFO's), Fluff-Squatch (aka Fluffy Blob of Fur in Photo) and ET-Squints (i.e. ET's needing Squinting into inky blotch on photo).
Harry... :rolleyes: The aliens disable advanced cameras with EMP weapons that they shared with Sasquatch. Your only hope is to use primitive technology. 1980s style camcorder or 8mm film.
 
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hollybush

EOS M50
Feb 1, 2012
41
17
A lot of Canon shooters are put off by iTR because it requires the AF point selection mode to be set to 'Auto". What they don't realize is that it still allows them to choose a specific AF point for the initial subject acquisition. If Canon had an "iTR" AF point selection mode that was separate from "Auto", a lot more 1D X and 1D X Mark II users would probably try it.
It's hidden as a custom function (something like "select initial AF point") instead of being another AF mode on the same level as "all points", "spot" etc. I completely missed it when reading the 1Dx Mk II manual and had to be told of its existence. So I suspect you're right and many others missed it too.

It was actually a feature I decided was missing from my 1D Mk III, without knowing what it was called, for bird photography.
 
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Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
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And looking through an EVF in strong lighting conditions is really unpleasant compared to an OVF. I own the EOS R, and I think it is very good in most ways, but I don’t like using it in strong light. Highlights and shadows does not look natural, and using an EVF in such conditions takes the joy out of photography. I hope the OVF stays for a long time, AND I hope newer DSLRs comes with exchangeable matte screens, such as the 1D series, the 6D, 5D classic and 5DII.
Couldn't agree more, especially as to interchangeable matte screens (EOS 1 not ideal for me, macro photography!).
But the EOS R has an edge when using vintage lenses for macro, DSLR finders getting quite dark when closing the diaphragm. Sometimes, at F.16, I no longer see the flower...That's why I also bought the EOS R, even though I sold it in order to wait for the Hi-resolution EOS R. The "R" is a very fine little camera, but I still prefer my 5 D III in most conditions...
 

Del Paso

M3 Singlestroke
Aug 9, 2018
525
501
The 1D X has never been mistaken for a video camera. It's built for one thing: speed for stills. You might notice that there has not been a 1D C Mark II version of the 1D X Mark II.

If Canon ever does that in a stills camera (they won't because they sell video cameras that do all of that), it would be in a 5-series type of body, not a 1-series.



Why? The tracking AF performance of the 1D X Mark II is better than both of those. It doesn't matter how many frames per second one can shoot if 2/3 of them are not acceptably in focus.




No one buys a 1D X as a video camera. Very few even bought the 1D C as a video camera. You might notice that there has not been a 1D C Mark II version of the 1D X Mark II.




Not really. The α9 slows down to 1D X Mark II frame rates when AF tracking is desired between each frame. Or when using the wrong E-mount lenses. It's as slow as the EOS R when using adapted Canon lenses.



DP CMOS does not "drop" the sensels it uses for AF. 80% of the sensels on a DP CMOS sensor are available for AF. The data from them are also included in the image. That's one reason reading them out takes so long...



The 1D X Mark III is not about video. It's about sports/reportage.




With continuous AF between every frame, the α9 slows down to 15 fps with all but a handful of lenses.




Pros that use the 1D-series know that their great whites work with 1.4X extenders. They also know that an EF-RF adapter is simpler than an extender.

They're not the same crowd that uses cheap third party adapters in order to use a new mirrorless body that only has electrical connections to its native lenses with a 50 year old mechanically operated lens and then wonders why everything doesn't work perfectly.



Spec sheet warriors have no clue that if you can't get it with 14 fps, 30 fps or 60fps ain't gonna' help you. It's just gonna' give you more bad frames to sort through. (Yes there are very rare use cases where the additional fps is useful, but most of those do not require continuous tracking between frames, and very few would benefit from higher resolution than 4K frame grabs at 30 or 60 fps.)



Does he realize that with adapted lenses, the α9 slows down to 5 fps in continuous AF tracking mode? Do you before you made that up?

Prepare to be surprised.



You obviously haven't been paying attention lately. The 5D Mark III dropped about $700 a few months before the introduction of the 5D Mark IV at the same price as the 5DIII had sold for many years before it went on sale. The EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II sold for $2,300 for years, then for $2,100 for years after the yen dropped against the dollar (so $2,100 USD was actually worth more yen than $2,300 USD had previously been). Six weeks before the EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS III was announced, the price of the "II" dropped to $1,800. Then the "III" was introduced for the "higher price" of $2,100 USD.



If you ever buy a 1D X Mark III MILC it will be in your dreams and nowhere else.
Excellent and intelligent statements!(y)
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
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It's hidden as a custom function (something like "select initial AF point") instead of being another AF mode on the same level as "all points", "spot" etc. I completely missed it when reading the 1Dx Mk II manual and had to be told of its existence. So I suspect you're right and many others missed it too.

It was actually a feature I decided was missing from my 1D Mk III, without knowing what it was called, for bird photography.
I'm pretty sure the 1D X was the first one with iTR, which includes a color RGB+IR metering sensor and a dedicated processor for AF/metering. The 1D Mark III did not have a color light meter. The menu option you are recalling is for selecting the "Home Position" AF point, but it's not iTR.
 

Larsskv

EOS 7D MK II
Jun 12, 2015
763
183
Couldn't agree more, especially as to interchangeable matte screens (EOS 1 not ideal for me, macro photography!).
But the EOS R has an edge when using vintage lenses for macro, DSLR finders getting quite dark when closing the diaphragm. Sometimes, at F.16, I no longer see the flower...That's why I also bought the EOS R, even though I sold it in order to wait for the Hi-resolution EOS R. The "R" is a very fine little camera, but I still prefer my 5 D III in most conditions...
I wish the debates were more nuanced in here, because EVFs are better in some conditions, OVFs in others. Too many in here (not you) has a black or white view on this topic.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
912
435
My issue with iTR is that it's not "sticky" enough even with all the parameters set to emphasize sticking to the acquired subject. It seems like Nikon's latest iteration sticks better. Given the high-pixel-count metering sensors used in the latest bodies I'm guessing this would require nothing more than a firmware update from Canon. At airshows I bounce back and forth between single point and iTR and it definitely feels like Canon's algorithm just needs to be more stubborn, i.e. give more weight to the color data coming off the metering sensor.

Side note: plenty of people have bought the 1DX II for video. Judging from YouTube videos and commentary the 1DC and 1DX II have a bit of a cult following among cinematographers.
OK. "No one except cultists buy a 1D X for video."

How's that? Everything has a few cultists somewhere.
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
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privatebydesign said:
13. USB-C
Who needs USB-C when the current and previous versions already have gigabit ethernet ports?
Me. USB-C would give the possibility to shoot tethered and powered for when I spend days with the camera and a laptop on a set for product photography.

The Ethernet port I use for plugging into a venue for a remote and gives network access, USB-C doesn’t, I can then connect to and control the camera from my phone or iPad.

Ethernet allows very long cables, I have a 150’ one, my longest USB-C cable is 60”, but the Ethernet will never be able to supply enough power and USB-C will never have the range.

USB-C is 10 times faster than the 1DX MkII’s Ethernet port.

They have very different functionalities and uses, I currently use TetherTools cables and hard wired Ethernet and the WFT-E8 for different purposes at different times.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
912
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My issue with iTR is that it's not "sticky" enough even with all the parameters set to emphasize sticking to the acquired subject. It seems like Nikon's latest iteration sticks better. Given the high-pixel-count metering sensors used in the latest bodies I'm guessing this would require nothing more than a firmware update from Canon. At airshows I bounce back and forth between single point and iTR and it definitely feels like Canon's algorithm just needs to be more stubborn, i.e. give more weight to the color data coming off the metering sensor.

Side note: plenty of people have bought the 1DX II for video. Judging from YouTube videos and commentary the 1DC and 1DX II have a bit of a cult following among cinematographers.
You can alter the "stickiness" by adjusting the parameters under the AF use cases: tracking sensitivity, Accel./Decel. tracking, and AF pt auto switching. Also, be aware that a '2' setting for 'AF pt auto switching' under 'case 6' (For subjects that change speed and move erratically) will switch points faster than a '2' setting under case 1 (Versatile multipurpose setting).
 

Pape

EOS RP
Dec 31, 2018
377
222
---

Since I am pretty much right by BigFoot Central (aka Sasquatch Land!) in Southwestern British Columbia and Northern Washington State, I've been TRYING FOR YEARS to get a CRYSTAL CLEAR HIGH RESOLUTION STILL PHOTO and VIDEO (even going as far as bringing along multiple Canon C700 GS cameras!) of said Sasquatch and/or UFO and.or Alien Entity! NOTHING! ZERO! I have NEVER seen or shot anything YET! Carl Sagan once said "Absence of Evidence is NOT necessarily Evidence of Absence", so I'm still OPEN to the ideas of Sasquatch, UFO's and Aliens...BUT.... I haven't seen anything yet OTHER THAN as BLURFOS (i.e. Blurry UFO's), Fluff-Squatch (aka Fluffy Blob of Fur in Photo) and ET-Squints (i.e. ET's needing Squinting into inky blotch on photo).

Again, that Fisher Price plastic toy camera shooting 640 by 480 15 fps MAY YET come in handy to get that MILLION DOLLAR STILL PHOTO OR VIDEO! Key your toy camera in your pocket ready for action! It may YET buy you a new house!
.
.
problem with saquatch and ufo photographing is those thingies can see to future. All they need do to avoid getting photographed is choosing path what doesnt lead to getting photographed. Some lucky peoples may get photoes from drunken sasquatch but so rare thing ,its usually amateur photographer with crappy equipemnts.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
912
435
privatebydesign said:
13. USB-C


Me. USB-C would give the possibility to shoot tethered and powered for when I spend days with the camera and a laptop on a set for product photography.

The Ethernet port I use for plugging into a venue for a remote and gives network access, USB-C doesn’t, I can then connect to and control the camera from my phone or iPad.

Ethernet allows very long cables, I have a 150’ one, my longest USB-C cable is 60”, but the Ethernet will never be able to supply enough power and USB-C will never have the range.

USB-C is 10 times faster than the 1DX MkII’s Ethernet port.

They have very different functionalities and uses, I currently use TetherTools cables and hard wired Ethernet and the WFT-E8 for different purposes at different times.
The 1D X and 1D X Mark II RJ-45 jacks are capable of gigabit ethernet. If you're only getting 1/10 the speed of USB-C with the ethernet connection, it's because the network you're connecting to is limited to 10/100 speeds.

I hear you on the powered tethering. I hadn't considered that since generic power adapters/couplers are pretty cheap for the older LP-E4 powered 1-series and LP-E6 powered cameras. Apparently that isn't the case for the LP-E17. As long as Canon is getting enough folks to pay $220 for the coupler and $375 for the AC-E19 they aren't going to give anyone the ability to power via USB-C!
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
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You can alter the "stickiness" by adjusting the parameters under the AF use cases: tracking sensitivity, Accel./Decel. tracking, and AF pt auto switching. Also, be aware that a '2' setting for 'AF pt auto switching' under 'case 6' (For subjects that change speed and move erratically) will switch points faster than a '2' setting under case 1 (Versatile multipurpose setting).
Are you sure? Can you point to a white paper to explain that because I don’t use cases, I just adjust the three parameters on an ad hoc basis under the impression that the numbers were the numbers. What makes you say the same numbers are different values in different cases.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
912
435
Are you sure? Can you point to a white paper to explain that because I don’t use cases, I just adjust the three parameters on an ad hoc basis under the impression that the numbers were the numbers. What makes you say the same numbers are different values in different cases.
Because they are. Just like sharpening or contrast or other parameters are different for different picture styles.

The reference is the "EOS 1D X Mark II AF Setting Guidebook"
 
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privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
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The 1D X and 1D X Mark II RJ-45 jacks are capable of gigabit ethernet. If you're only getting 1/10 the speed of USB-C with the ethernet connection, it's because the network you're connecting to is limited to 10/100 speeds.

I hear you on the powered tethering. I hadn't considered that since generic power adapters/couplers are pretty cheap for the older LP-E4 powered 1-series and LP-E6 powered cameras. Apparently that isn't the case for the LP-E17. As long as Canon is getting enough folks to pay $220 for the coupler and $375 for the AC-E19 they aren't going to give anyone the ability to power via USB-C!
USB-C is max 10Gbps, the 1DX MkII RJ45 is 10/100/1000Mbps, or max 1Gbps.

Of course they could put a 10Gbps RJ45/8P8C socket in the 1DX MkIII, but that still wouldn’t solve the power problem. Talking about power, I kept the AC adapters that came with the 1Ds MkIII’s I owned so run a 1DX MkII Because they don’t come in the box now.
 

padam

EOS 7D MK II
Aug 26, 2015
582
209
The 1D X has never been mistaken for a video camera. It's built for one thing: speed for stills. You might notice that there has not been a 1D C Mark II version of the 1D X Mark II.

No one buys a 1D X as a video camera. Very few even bought the 1D C as a video camera. You might notice that there has not been a 1D C Mark II version of the 1D X Mark II.
Compared to the 1DC way more people bought (and still buying) the 1DX II specifically for video, because it was cheaper and better featured (and of course it is device that also takes stills), whether you like that or not.
It's really not major upgrade for stills over the 1DX, but it is a huge improvement for video. It has the best frame rates and rolling shutter performance from any of Canon's stills cameras with the best video AF.

And if there is no Canon MILC with the same video specs (it is unclear at this point if there is going to be, it could endanger their C-Line) they will continue to buy it. For video.

The reason why there is no 1DC II is because apart from the C-Log Profile everything is already in there in the 1DX II, so it makes no sense to release such a camera, this is probably a concept that they've already dropped for good with the 1DC. They could have given C-Log for a small fee, or skip that for marketing reasons, which is what they did, they might finally offer that in the Mark III but with other possible limitations, like a bigger crop factor.
 

Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
912
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USB-C is max 10Gbps, the 1DX MkII RJ45 is 10/100/1000Mbps, or max 1Gbps.

Of course they could put a 10Gbps RJ45/8P8C socket in the 1DX MkIII, but that still wouldn’t solve the power problem. Talking about power, I kept the AC adapters that came with the 1Ds MkIII’s I owned so run a 1DX MkII Because they don’t come in the box now.
Wow. I've not used anything with 10Gbps USB-C. I thought it maxed out at 1 Gbps. That's fast!

Do the LP-E4 power couplers run the 1D X Mark II? I assumed Canon had locked them out via firmware. That's something to keep in mind.
 
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Michael Clark

Now we see through a glass, darkly...
Apr 5, 2016
912
435
Compared to the 1DC way more people bought (and still buying) the 1DX II specifically for video, because it was cheaper and better featured (and of course it is device that also takes stills), whether you like that or not.
It's really not major upgrade for stills over the 1DX, but it is a huge improvement for video. It has the best frame rates and rolling shutter performance from any of Canon's stills cameras with the best video AF.

And if there is no Canon MILC with the same video specs (it is unclear at this point if there is going to be, it could endanger their C-Line) they will continue to buy it. For video.

The reason why there is no 1DC II is because apart from the C-Log Profile everything is already in there in the 1DX II, so it makes no sense to release such a camera, this is probably a concept that they've already dropped for good with the 1DC. They could have given C-Log for a small fee, or skip that for marketing reasons, which is what they did, they might finally offer that in the Mark III but with other possible limitations, like a bigger crop factor.
OK. OK. OK. There are people who buy the 1D X Mark II to use primarily as a video camera. I hear you. I just haven't run into any of them.

Having said that, I'm sure Canon would prefer one buy a 1D X (Mark whatever) for stills and a C whatever for video. That's what seems to drive a lot of their decisions about what they do and don't include in specific models: a way to dangle that last carrot to get you to buy both.
 

dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
1,387
823
OK. "No one except cultists buy a 1D X for video."

How's that? Everything has a few cultists somewhere.
Neither of us is in a position to know how many 1DX II bodies Canon has sold for video. Suffice it to say I've been surprised at how often it has turned up.

You can alter the "stickiness" by adjusting the parameters under the AF use cases: tracking sensitivity, Accel./Decel. tracking, and AF pt auto switching. Also, be aware that a '2' setting for 'AF pt auto switching' under 'case 6' (For subjects that change speed and move erratically) will switch points faster than a '2' setting under case 1 (Versatile multipurpose setting).
I explicitly said that I didn't find it to be sticky enough with all parameters maxed for 'stickiness.' It will drift or change in situations where it really should not.
 

privatebydesign

Would you take advice from a cartoons stuffed toy?
Jan 29, 2011
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Wow. I've not used anything with 10Gbps USB-C. I thought it maxed out at 1 Gbps. That's fast!

Do the LP-E4 power couplers run the 1D X Mark II? That's something to keep in mind.
Yes the coupler and power brick that came with the 1DS MkIII’s run the 1DX MkII’s fine, there are a couple of caveats as they don’t deliver the full power the newer versions do, but as you say, they are a fraction the price.

You don’t get 14fps and one or two other things but I can’t remember what, functionally I haven’t noticed an issue but I use them for single shot product work mostly. They do allow Live View etc.
 
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koenkooi

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
459
271
USB-C is max 10Gbps, the 1DX MkII RJ45 is 10/100/1000Mbps, or max 1Gbps.
[..]
To be a bit pedantic: USB-C is a form factor, not a protocol. The protocol speeds are like this:
  • USB 3.1 gen 1 (rebranded USB 3.0) allows for 5gbps over a single lane
  • USB 3.1 gen 2 allows for 10gbps over a single lane
  • USB 3.2 gen 2x2 allows for an extra lane, so 2x 10gbps or 2x 5gbps.
  • Thunderbolt 3 allows for 40gbps over an USB-C cable
The USB spec tends to rebrand N-1 as N in some form e.g. USB2 'full speed' is actually USB1 speed and the 3.1gen1 thing above, so this list will probably be wrong in the future :)