Canon EOS M6 Mark II promotional video appears to have leaked

Tyroop

EOS 80D
Jun 30, 2013
123
12
My wife has this iso changing issue on her M6 and so do I when I use it. What happens is that when you turn the camera off, you turn the dial with the on/off switch. So you need to be careful to only move the on/off switch. It's very easy to move the dial this way.
Thanks for your response, but this isn't my issue. The dial is detented and it takes quite a lot of effort to move to each click. If I accidentally turned the dial while turning the camera off I would hear and/or feel the click. I don't. When I first started experiencing the problem, I thought exactly the same as you. In an attempt to overcome the problem I disabled the dial through the custom functions so that it didn't do anything when turned. However, the problem didn't go away.

I've just tried again turning the camera on and off multiple times and whenever I do so my finger doesn't touch the dial. I've always wanted to believe there was a simple answer, but I have never found one. Also, this wouldn't account for the fact that occasionally when the camera is on I look at the screen and see that the ISO scale has popped up for no reason. The camera seems to have a mind of its own.
 

SecureGSM

2 x 5D IV
Feb 26, 2017
1,242
263
So the M6II will soon be tied as Canon's fastest burst rate camera, and fastest in Raw burst? :sneaky:
Certainly that's not comparing apples to apples (and a cheeky comment), but it does imply what could be possible in the future bodies. Interesting stuff
Add a second Digic processor in then we are talking, baby.
 
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shunsai

EOS RP
Oct 15, 2011
208
90
This camera looks like it might finally replace my M3! I had been on the fence about replacing my M3 with the M50, but didn't feel it was giving me everything I wanted. I still love the M3's pocketable size format and I'm not big on OVFs, so full specs pending, this looks like the one for me.
 

snoke

EOS RP
Jul 20, 2017
282
24
M6 = 90D - mirror
14 fps = 10fs - mirror
mirror = -4fps

1DXII = 14 fps
1DXII - mirror = 18 fps
Or
1DXII - mirror = 14 * (1 + 4/10) = 19.6 fps
 
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neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
24,605
2,060
M6 = 90D - mirror
14 fps = 10fs - mirror
mirror = -4fps

1DXII = 14 fps
1DXII - mirror = 18 fps
Or
1DXII - mirror = 14 * (1 + 4/10) = 19.6 fps
1DXII - mirror = 16 fps

Facts trump mathematical extrapolation.
 
Jul 12, 2013
245
78
Regarding (1) Are you sure it is being changed accidentally? How do you think it is being accidentally changed and can you reproduce the problem? As you know, there are different ways of changing the ISO value on the M6. I've always had a problem with my M6 that the ISO changes on its own - yes, really. I love the camera, but this is by far the biggest problem. I've been using Canon cameras since 1981 - this is not a newbie user error.

Despite trying, I can't recreate the problem at will. At first I thought I was accidentally turning the ISO dial underneath the exposure compensation dial, but this dial is actually quite stiff and difficult to turn accidentally. On many occasions while walking around turning the camera on and off taking photos, I have suddenly realised that the ISO has changed from Auto to 25600. Sometimes it will change to another value, but it mainly changes to 25600.

If it changes to ISO 100 in daylight that isn't a problem. However, ISO 25600 makes all the images too grainy to use. This is very, very annoying especially if I am taking photos at a location where I can't return easily. While photographing the ruins at My Son in Vietnam a couple of years ago I was just about to leave when I realised the ISO was set at 25600. When I started shooting the value was Auto. The initial photos were fine, but suddenly everything went to a fixed ISO of 25600 without me changing anything.

At first I was convinced that it was me inadvertently changing it somehow, but it's not. I have considered all the possible ways that I could change the ISO accidentally and tried to recreate the problem, but without success. On a couple of occasions I have looked down at the screen and seen the ISO scale pop up on its own.

Since realising the camera has this issue I have to look at the display frequently to check that the ISO value I set (normally Auto) hasn't changed by itself.

On forums I have seen a couple of other people complaining about the same problem with the M6, but not many. I guess that most people think they are doing it themselves accidentally or that it only exists on some, not all, M6's. I used the original EOS M before the M6 and never had this problem.

Anyway, I am a big EOS M series fan and will buy an EOS M6 II. Hopefully, this annoying problem will not exist in the new model.

Also, focus bracketing was mentioned in a previous rumoured spec list, but not in this latest video. That was a feature I really liked the sound of for macro and focus stacking.
Tyroop: Canon camera user since 1981?! Outstanding...

I have had the 'ISO moved and I don't know how it happened' situation occur to me on at least three occasions that I remember.

One was at Epcot Center in Disney World...and what happened had to do with me not being careful with how I put the camera back in its case (I think).

As I've posted here over and over, the M-series fits my usage pattern because of its huge [sensor size/(volume + weight)] ratio (yeah, I know, the units for this 'constant' would not be pretty).

What happens when I'm with my wife and/or two daughters is...I get more-and-better pictures (while traveling)...if I'm not looking like the AV geek from high school.

There are three scenarios:

(1) So I have a couple of different smallish shoulder bags (one of which carries the M6 and M10, while both are connected to various M lenses). But the fit is tight. And I'm certain that, when going from a dark WDW attraction to Florida sunshine...while in a hurry to the next attraction , the M6 was turned on and the ISO was changed from AUTO to 25600 (ruining a half-dozen or so pics...until I noticed it).

The same thing has happened while hurrying to remove/replace the M6/22mm f2 combo into an extremely form-fitting belt-mounted case. I need to be careful extracting the device. But I love this set-up because I have a first-rate body/lens combo that enables 'look ma, no hands'. So in a sense I've reproduced this (user) error.

(2) I have to (slightly) disagree with you about the detents for changing ISO, at least on my M6. You're right...there are clicks when changing ISO...but in my view Canon designed the ISO knob on the M6 to be moved with ease by one's thumb. And it does work. But of course there's a smaller diameter knob on top of the ISO knob: the exposure compensation knob. My first times when I (accidentally and unknowingly) changed ISO was when I used my thumb alone to change exposure compensation. The detents for exposure compensation are somewhat stiffer and clickier (at least on my M6)...and what happens, when attempting to change exposure compensation by thumb alone, I often change the ISO. There are threads about this elsewhere. For me, this was a simple 'fix': when changing exposure compensation, I use both my thumb and my index finger...more from the top of the camera...thus avoiding even touching the lower ISO knob. I have certainly reproduced this user error.

(3) The last situation in which the camera seemed to 'turn itself on' and change ISO occurred about ten days ago...and it happened repeatedly...and I knew that I would end up describing what transpired. In order to get my M's into form-fitting cases, I do not use the Canon-supplied straps. I use straps that are quite similar to the straps Canon shipped with both the S90 and S95 cameras. All of the M's I've used...from M to M6...work very well with these straps...and when any of the M's are mated to the 22mm lens, the kit fits nicely in the palm of my hand...almost out of sight. My most oft-used M lens is the 11-22 (the format's killer app, in my view)...and this combination's ergonomics are fine with the small straps.

But last week I tried to change things up a bit...and used a longer version of the thin straps...one that can be hung around my neck...with the camera dangling...and, when walking on the beach...banging a bit back-and-forth. Here's the deal. When the M6 was connected to the 15-45 lens, no problem.

But when I tried the same set-up with the 18-150...the rocking back-and-forth...into my chest...was significant enough to turn on the camera...repeatedly. And twice the ISO changed!

So I'll need to use the proper Canon strap when traveling with the M6/18-150 combo...a strap that has two points of connection to the camera...and the back of the camera therefore sits gently where it is supposed to.

=====

Clearly, in the M6 II, the knob devoted solely to exposure compensation in the M6 I...is gone. I never liked that knob anyway...I much prefer the exposure compensation implementation on earlier Ms and even the S series of cameras. I suppose the knob on top makes sense if you use a viewfinder (I have one for the M6 and seldom use it...but that's another story for another post). It kind of looks like the power on-off mechanism is a bit different, too. We'll see.

I hope what I've written makes sense...and I'll keep shooting with the M6--a fabulous device in a tiny package.

Thanks for reading.
 

Tyroop

EOS 80D
Jun 30, 2013
123
12
Tyroop: Canon camera user since 1981?! Outstanding...

I have had the 'ISO moved and I don't know how it happened' situation occur to me on at least three occasions that I remember.

One was at Epcot Center in Disney World...and what happened had to do with me not being careful with how I put the camera back in its case (I think).

As I've posted here over and over, the M-series fits my usage pattern because of its huge [sensor size/(volume + weight)] ratio (yeah, I know, the units for this 'constant' would not be pretty).

What happens when I'm with my wife and/or two daughters is...I get more-and-better pictures (while traveling)...if I'm not looking like the AV geek from high school.

There are three scenarios:

(1) So I have a couple of different smallish shoulder bags (one of which carries the M6 and M10, while both are connected to various M lenses). But the fit is tight. And I'm certain that, when going from a dark WDW attraction to Florida sunshine...while in a hurry to the next attraction , the M6 was turned on and the ISO was changed from AUTO to 25600 (ruining a half-dozen or so pics...until I noticed it).

The same thing has happened while hurrying to remove/replace the M6/22mm f2 combo into an extremely form-fitting belt-mounted case. I need to be careful extracting the device. But I love this set-up because I have a first-rate body/lens combo that enables 'look ma, no hands'. So in a sense I've reproduced this (user) error.

(2) I have to (slightly) disagree with you about the detents for changing ISO, at least on my M6. You're right...there are clicks when changing ISO...but in my view Canon designed the ISO knob on the M6 to be moved with ease by one's thumb. And it does work. But of course there's a smaller diameter knob on top of the ISO knob: the exposure compensation knob. My first times when I (accidentally and unknowingly) changed ISO was when I used my thumb alone to change exposure compensation. The detents for exposure compensation are somewhat stiffer and clickier (at least on my M6)...and what happens, when attempting to change exposure compensation by thumb alone, I often change the ISO. There are threads about this elsewhere. For me, this was a simple 'fix': when changing exposure compensation, I use both my thumb and my index finger...more from the top of the camera...thus avoiding even touching the lower ISO knob. I have certainly reproduced this user error.

(3) The last situation in which the camera seemed to 'turn itself on' and change ISO occurred about ten days ago...and it happened repeatedly...and I knew that I would end up describing what transpired. In order to get my M's into form-fitting cases, I do not use the Canon-supplied straps. I use straps that are quite similar to the straps Canon shipped with both the S90 and S95 cameras. All of the M's I've used...from M to M6...work very well with these straps...and when any of the M's are mated to the 22mm lens, the kit fits nicely in the palm of my hand...almost out of sight. My most oft-used M lens is the 11-22 (the format's killer app, in my view)...and this combination's ergonomics are fine with the small straps.

But last week I tried to change things up a bit...and used a longer version of the thin straps...one that can be hung around my neck...with the camera dangling...and, when walking on the beach...banging a bit back-and-forth. Here's the deal. When the M6 was connected to the 15-45 lens, no problem.

But when I tried the same set-up with the 18-150...the rocking back-and-forth...into my chest...was significant enough to turn on the camera...repeatedly. And twice the ISO changed!

So I'll need to use the proper Canon strap when traveling with the M6/18-150 combo...a strap that has two points of connection to the camera...and the back of the camera therefore sits gently where it is supposed to.

=====

Clearly, in the M6 II, the knob devoted solely to exposure compensation in the M6 I...is gone. I never liked that knob anyway...I much prefer the exposure compensation implementation on earlier Ms and even the S series of cameras. I suppose the knob on top makes sense if you use a viewfinder (I have one for the M6 and seldom use it...but that's another story for another post). It kind of looks like the power on-off mechanism is a bit different, too. We'll see.

I hope what I've written makes sense...and I'll keep shooting with the M6--a fabulous device in a tiny package.

Thanks for reading.
Thanks for your response. Yes, an A1 for my 21st birthday in 1981 started it all off. Canon film cameras until 2003. Canon DSLRs from 2004 (including a period with a Powershot S90) until I moved to EOS M in June 2013. I like EOS M for the same reasons as you. I loved the convenience of the S90, but it lacked performance and image quality. I find that the EOS M provides the best of all worlds in terms of performance, image quality and size. I don't need blazing fast AF or frame rates for the photography I do.

For a long time I really wanted to believe it was me causing the ISO problem. Either accidentally moving a physical dial or the camera bumping against my chest when it was around my neck and changing the ISO via the touch screen. However, I have tried every perceivable way of reproducing the problem and I can't. It has happened to me a lot more than three times. I've been using the M6 almost every day since September 2017.

The ISO dial isn't difficult to turn, per se, but there is enough resistance to stop it being turned accidentally. It needs a deliberate action to rotate it, as it should do. And anyway, when I disabled the dial through the CFn menu the problem was still there.

I like to set up the camera before a session and then just concentrate on composition while I'm shooting. I use M, AV and TV and select a fixed ISO occasionally, but most of the time I just use P and Auto ISO. The automatic settings do a good job in most situations. Whenever I adjust the EC I use my thumb and finger and I've never had a problem with the ISO changing when I adjust EC. Ideally, I'd like to turn the information display off and just have the level indicator showing. Because of this issue, I can't do that. I have to check the display repeatedly and often to ensure that the camera hasn't suddenly changed to ISO 25600.

I know that we won't all agree and at this stage of the game Canon aren't going to change anything, even if they admit there is a problem. With today's rapid camera replacement cycle it is easier just to move to a later model.

I'm not sure yet when the Mark 2 will be available, but when funds allow I will get one. My Mark 1 will certainly not be retired. There is just the one issue and I'm now in the habit of constantly checking the ISO value on the screen, just in case. It's still a great little camera.
 

snoke

EOS RP
Jul 20, 2017
282
24
1DXII - mirror = 16 fps

Facts trump mathematical extrapolation.
Different. 1DXII still have mirror. Cannot remove. Mirror locked. not gone. 1DXII optimal mirror locked?

14 -> 16, 14% better.
10 -> 14, 40% better.

1DXII is apple, 90D is orange.

EOS RX = 1DXIII - mirror? Who know.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 21, 2010
24,605
2,060
Different. 1DXII still have mirror. Cannot remove. Mirror locked. not gone. 1DXII optimal mirror locked?

14 -> 16, 14% better.
10 -> 14, 40% better.

1DXII is apple, 90D is orange.

EOS RX = 1DXIII - mirror? Who know.
There is no practical difference between mirror locked up and mirror gone. If you choose to believe your theoretical assumptions of possible performance for an existing product over actual technical specifications of that product, go ahead.
 
Jul 12, 2013
245
78
Thanks for your response. Yes, an A1 for my 21st birthday in 1981 started it all off. Canon film cameras until 2003. Canon DSLRs from 2004 (including a period with a Powershot S90) until I moved to EOS M in June 2013. I like EOS M for the same reasons as you. I loved the convenience of the S90, but it lacked performance and image quality. I find that the EOS M provides the best of all worlds in terms of performance, image quality and size. I don't need blazing fast AF or frame rates for the photography I do.

For a long time I really wanted to believe it was me causing the ISO problem. Either accidentally moving a physical dial or the camera bumping against my chest when it was around my neck and changing the ISO via the touch screen. However, I have tried every perceivable way of reproducing the problem and I can't. It has happened to me a lot more than three times. I've been using the M6 almost every day since September 2017.

The ISO dial isn't difficult to turn, per se, but there is enough resistance to stop it being turned accidentally. It needs a deliberate action to rotate it, as it should do. And anyway, when I disabled the dial through the CFn menu the problem was still there.

I like to set up the camera before a session and then just concentrate on composition while I'm shooting. I use M, AV and TV and select a fixed ISO occasionally, but most of the time I just use P and Auto ISO. The automatic settings do a good job in most situations. Whenever I adjust the EC I use my thumb and finger and I've never had a problem with the ISO changing when I adjust EC. Ideally, I'd like to turn the information display off and just have the level indicator showing. Because of this issue, I can't do that. I have to check the display repeatedly and often to ensure that the camera hasn't suddenly changed to ISO 25600.

I know that we won't all agree and at this stage of the game Canon aren't going to change anything, even if they admit there is a problem. With today's rapid camera replacement cycle it is easier just to move to a later model.

I'm not sure yet when the Mark 2 will be available, but when funds allow I will get one. My Mark 1 will certainly not be retired. There is just the one issue and I'm now in the habit of constantly checking the ISO value on the screen, just in case. It's still a great little camera.
An additional point: I'm certain, in most of the situations I've described in which ISO moves 'by itself'...what happens is that the camera 'turns itself on' and then the ISO is changed via the touchscreen.

I've lost count of how many Canon cameras I've purchased...for myself and my immediate family--at least a dozen-and-a-half.

My first DSLR was the A2...purchased in 1996 or 1997 (I think).

Our first digital: the Canon SD 10...about 2004.

The only time I've had problems with a camera turning itself on (unintentionally) is what I've described in this thread.

But I've used the M6 in more challenging situations...and will continue to do so. It is a marvelous device...and when attached to the 11-22...oh my.
 

++k

Jul 27, 2019
7
20
I don't recall ever seeing a mechanical MF-AF switch on the back of an M series camera (or any Canon whatsoever), nor an "AF start" button. Any ideas on what "AF start" actually does? Does it just turn on continuous focusing from any other mode?
 

koenkooi

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
459
271
I don't recall ever seeing a mechanical MF-AF switch on the back of an M series camera (or any Canon whatsoever), nor an "AF start" button. Any ideas on what "AF start" actually does? Does it just turn on continuous focusing from any other mode?
I bet it's like the 'AF-ON' button on other cameras, same as half pressing the shutter button. I have my 7D configured for back button focus, but I've never warmed up to configuring my Ms the same way.
 
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